• Share
  • Email
  • Embed
  • Like
  • Save
  • Private Content
Rivers 2
 

Rivers 2

on

  • 5,627 views

 

Statistics

Views

Total Views
5,627
Views on SlideShare
5,579
Embed Views
48

Actions

Likes
2
Downloads
236
Comments
0

1 Embed 48

http://wise4.berkeley.edu 48

Accessibility

Categories

Upload Details

Uploaded via as Adobe PDF

Usage Rights

© All Rights Reserved

Report content

Flagged as inappropriate Flag as inappropriate
Flag as inappropriate

Select your reason for flagging this presentation as inappropriate.

Cancel
  • Full Name Full Name Comment goes here.
    Are you sure you want to
    Your message goes here
    Processing…
Post Comment
Edit your comment

    Rivers 2 Rivers 2 Presentation Transcript

    • Topic: Rivers 21. Formation of River  Landforms I. Upper Course: a) Valleys b) Gorges Formed by Erosion c) Waterfalls II. Middle Course: a) Meanders Formed by Erosion &  Deposition III. Lower Course: a) Meanders b) Floodplains Formed by Deposition c) Deltas 1
    • LANDFORMS FORMED BY EROSION
    • 2.1 A Valley
    • 1.  2.  Lateral erosion River Hard Rock Hard Rock3.  V‐shaped  Valley Hard Rock
    • 2.1 Formation of Valleys1. River flows over an area of hard rocks.2. Due to the steep gradient and resistant  rocks, vertical erosion is faster than lateral  erosion.3. Over time, the river channel deepens by  hydraulic action, abrasion and sometimes  solution.4. Eventually, a steep‐sided valley is formed.
    • 2.2 A Gorge A Gorge is an  exceptionally deep and  narrow valley.
    • 1.  2.  Vertical erosion > Lateral erosion River Lateral erosion Very Hard Rock Very Hard Rock3.  Gorge Very Hard Rock
    • Formation of Gorges (Method 1)1. River flows through an area of very hard  rocks.2. Due to the rock hardness and steep gradient,  vertical erosion dominates.3. Over time, a deep, narrow and steep‐sided  (almost vertical) valley called a gorge is  formed.
    • Side View Front View of Waterfall1.  2.  Waterfall retreats backwards Soft rocks Hard rocks Soft rocks3.  4.  Waterfall retreats backwards A gorge is formed
    • Formation of Gorges (Method 2)1. As the soft rocks at the base of the waterfall  get undercut by the river water,2. the tip of the waterfall loses support beneath  and collapses into the water.3. Overtime, the cycle repeats and the waterfall  retreats backwards4. leaving behind a deep, narrow and steep‐ sided valley called a Gorge.
    • 2.3 A Waterfall
    • 1.  2. Soft rock Soft rock Hard Hard rock Soft rock Soft rock rock3.  4.  Waterfall SoftSoft rock rock Plunge Hard rock Hard rock Soft Pool Soft rock rock
    • 2.3 Formation of a Waterfall1. As rivers flow through bands of hard and soft rocks.2. Softer rocks gets eroded faster than the hard rocks.3. This causes the gradient to steepen.4. Over time, the river plunges from a great height, hitting  the base with great force.5. This sudden, steep vertical flow of fast moving water  from a great height is called a waterfall.6. Repeated pounding of the water against the water bed 7. will create a depression at the base of the waterfall called  a plunge pool.
    • LANDFORMS FORMED BY EROSION & DEPOSITION
    • 2.4 A Meander
    • 1.  2.  Deposition Outer Inner convex (D) concave bank Erosion bank (E) River  D Outer Inner convex Cliff concave bank E bank Outer Slip‐off  concave Inner convex D slope bank bank 3.  Separated 4.  Ox-bow by a narrow lake D neck E DLegend Cut-off Erosion D Deposition
    • 2.4 Formation of Meanders1. As a river flows around a bend, river speed is faster on the outer  concave bank.2. Hence, erosion by undercutting occurs.3. Over time, a steep‐sided bank called a RIVER CLIFF is formed on the  outer bank.4. As the river speed is slower on the inner convex bank, deposition  occurs.5. Over time, a gentle SLIP‐OFF SLOPE is formed on the inner bank.6. With repeated erosion and deposition, the meander becomes  more and more pronounced, eventually separated by a narrow  neck.7. Eventually, the river breaks through the neck and flows in a  straight channel.8. The cut‐off forms an ox‐bow lake.
    • Deposition at the Erosion on the  inner convex bank outer concave  forms a gentle slip‐bank forms a  off slope.river cliff.
    • Meander Ox‐bow  lake
    • LANDFORMS FORMED BY DEPOSITION
    • 2.5 A Floodplain
    • 1.  2.  Heavy and continuous rain, Finer load river overflows its banks Coarser load3.  Floodplain Levee
    • 2.5 Formation of Floodplain and Levees1. After a heavy and long period of rain, the river may  overflow its banks causing a flood.2. As the water spreads over a larger area, the  friction increases causing the river lose energy and  deposit its load.3. The coarser and heavier sediments are deposited  on the immediate river banks whereas finer and  lighter sediments are carried further away.4. Over a series of floods, these layers of sediments  forms a floodplain and the coarser materials that  have accumulated on the immediate banks form  Levees.
    • 2.6 A Delta
    • 1.  2.  Land Sea Land Sea River River Distributaries3.  Land Sea River Delta
    • 2.6 Formation of a Delta1. When river enters a larger water body such as a  sea, its speed of flow and hence river energy is  reduced. Hence, it starts to deposit its load.2. At the river mouth, heavier sediments such as  sand is deposit close to the shore whereas lighter  sediments such as silt and clay are carried further  out before being deposited.3. The layers of deposition at the river mouth block  the flow of water into the sea, hence the river  branches out into smaller streams called  distributaries. 4. Over time, an extensive depositional landform  called a delta is formed at the river mouth.