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Cpd ch 3 vision of success
 

Cpd ch 3 vision of success

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  • Sometimes, people want to know what the difference is between a vision and a mission. A vision is a (read slide) While a mission is (read slide). In our work today, we’ll be focusing on our vision for the future.
  • It’s also important to understand the difference between a vision and a goal. While a vision is (read slide), A goal is (read slide). This distinction is important because we want to make sure that our vision is not limited by our current perception of reality. Visions are meant to be lofty.
  • Another way to think of a vision is as a painting of our school using words to describe our students, teachers, school and community.
  • This quote from Jerry Bamberg tells us what happens when educators don’t have a common vision for student success. A vision helps us join forces for a common purpose.
  • Visioning, while not based in reality, has some very practical purposes. A common vision helps us to join forces for a common purpose. It focuses our energy on help students. It helps us let go of the past and acknowledge the common future we have together. Visioning helps us to raise our expectations for all students and have energy for change. Visioning is the glue that helps us join forces to implement positive initiatives for students.
  • Note: Pass out copies of the Visioning Activity Sheet (if participants will work individually) or a poster of the sheet (if participants will be working in small groups). “ Our vision will answers four questions. We’ve already answered the first question: What do we believe all students deserve? Note: If it has been a while since your groups wrote their core convictions, they should be reviewed at this point. If you’re reproducing the Visioning Activity Sheet, you may want to type your core convictions into this first quadrant before duplicating. Note: Many schools struggle with the degree to which they should summarize their core convictions. Your goal is to make the core convictions as simple as possible without loosing individual ideas. With that in mind, listing thousands of core convictions would not be helpful because each individual conviction would get lost in the masses. On the other hand, collapsing hundreds of convictions into 1-3 conviction statements would force each conviction to be so broad that it would loses the individual ideas.
  • The second question helps us to describe ideal adults in our building. If the adults are living by their core convictions, what are their attitudes and what are they doing? For example, if one of our core convictions is that all students deserve to be treated with respect, and we really believe that, how would the adults be acting? This activity is a brainstorm. That means that your group will write down as many answers as you can, as quickly as you can, without discussion. The purpose of a brainstorm is to enhance creativity as one response leads to another. Before you begin, please appoint a “brainstorm police” to stop the group if they start discussing an idea. You’ll have ten minutes to work on this question. After five minutes, say: “ We want to make sure that you’re thinking broadly as you brainstorm. Be sure to think about these questions:” (Put up the next slide and let people work for about five more minutes)
  • (After the groups have been working for about 5 minutes) To make sure we’ve thought about the things kids deserve in many different areas, think about each of these areas for a few seconds. What do students deserve in each of these areas? You have five more minutes to add ideas to your list.
  • The third question involves the students. In a building where the adults are living by their core convictions, what would be the attitudes and behavior of the students? In this section, please brainstorm the ideal student. You have about ten minutes.
  • The fourth part of the Vision Statement deals with data. Think about all the achievement standards (data that measures mastery of content) that we set for students. List those measures and then write the percentage of students who, in our vision, are meeting each of our achievement standards. For example, an achievement standard might be the percentage of students who pass ISTEP (GQE) math and English; the percentage of student passing all classes; or the percentage of third graders reading at grade level. This is a two step process. First write down the academic standard that you would like students to reach (for example pass ISTEP), then write down the percentage of students you would like to meet that standard. Be careful that you’re writing down academic goals and not student choice goals. For example, attendance is important but our attendance rate reflects choices the students make (whether or not to come to school) rather than achievement data. Student choice data, like attendance, is important because it influences achievement. We’ll discuss student choice data in another step (Force Field Analysis). Note: After about five minutes, ask people to share their standards and the percentage of students who are meeting each standard. Note: Many people will come up with percentages less than 100% Your challenge is to help them think about success for all students. One way to do this is to have anyone who didn’t have 100% turn their papers over and write the names of the students they have selected to not meet this standard. Usually, this is a quick way to help people see that they really do have dreams for all students. Another way to help folks think about 100% of all students is to give an example from the health profession. What if hospitals said that they only had a vision of 98% of their patients living through surgery? What if airlines only had a vision for 95% of their flights not crashing? What if the post office’s vision only included the delivery of 92% of its mail? Hopefully, people will begin to see that the school’s purpose is to educate all students, and the disserve we do to students when schools only dream about educating 92% or 97%. DISCUSSION: It might help to remind people that a vision is “dreamy,” and not based in reality. Reality will come with step four of Vision-to-Action (data target). Some people think there is no practical purpose to visioning because it is so “pie-in-the-sky.” You might want to return to slide four to remind people why you’re doing this “dreamy” work. Some people are uncomfortable with visioning because they think someone is going to hold them accountable for reaching the vision. It might help to put their fears to rest by telling people that they will not be held accountable for their vision. The expectation is simply that they move toward the vision.
  • VISION. The responsible leader inspires the team member through thousands of visions. Not only has he visions of totality but he also helps his colleagues to develop and see them. Vision inspires. Vision creates a mission. Then the team has to take actions to fulfil the mission which realises the vision. The vision is nothing but seeing thousand possible combinations and scenarios. A vision is beyond normal senses and a super-sense is essential to visualise. The responsible leader does not limit the discussion, interactions, development of alternatives and decisions just to logical approach but continuously encourages his team members to think creatively, differently, non-logically and see many visions of different combinations, forms and shapes. Thus in the presence of a responsible leader the atmosphere is charged with daring, innovative and creative spirit. The leader and the team combine like a vision and mission to ensure contribute results through proper actions. THE VISIONARY CONCEIVES THE IMPOSSIBLE. THE MISSIONARY MAKES IT POSSIBLE.
  • SUPER-VISION. Simply owing to the presence of a responsible leader, things move and results occur. The overall view and supervision of the leader generates alertness, awareness and consciousness in all team member. People awake and perform excellently. A responsible leader see, observes, looks, perceives, conceives and sights all the possibilities, probabilities and optimality's of different situations and integrates what has happened, what is happening and what is about to happen and visualises what is the best that must happen. That is a responsible leader's super-vision. When the leader shares his vision of overall benefit people get inspired and things just happen. Things occur in two ways. Some of them are fixed as durable changes. The responsible leader is aware of the transitory changes and prepares the team for the situation to derive benefits from these changes. Regarding durable changes the responsible leader ensures that a team adjust, accommodates, adopts and achieves in new situations. The presence of the responsible leader is the presence of total understanding and overall accountability. SUPERVISION IS SUPER-VISION.

Cpd ch 3 vision of success Cpd ch 3 vision of success Presentation Transcript

  • SUBMITTED BY (MECHANICAL 8th SEM) KALARIYA PRITESH DURLABHAJIBHAI (080050119009)MAHAJAN PARTH VIDYADHAR (080050119013) MEHTA PARTH NARESH (080050119015) BHAVSAR JIGAR BHARATKUMAR (080050119005)
  • VISION vs MISSION VISION describes a perfect world. It’s a lofty and bold dream. MISSION is a brief statement that says(basically) that it’s the function of the school to move toward the vision. © Reynolds and Hines, 2000
  • VISION vs GOAL VISION describes a perfect world. It’s a lofty and bold dream. GOAL is a realistic step between the currentsituation and the vision. It’s reachable within a certain time frame. © Reynolds and Hines, 2000
  • VISIONPainting of your ideal school usingwords to describe your studentsteachers,school,andcommunity. © American Student Achievement Institute, 1996 - 2000
  • Jerry Bamberg Without a common vision, the school becomes a“collection of cottage industries operating in isolation under the same roof.” Source: Jerry Bamburg, North Central Regional Educational Laboratory © American Student Achievement Institute, 1996 - 2000
  • THE PRACTICAL BENEFITS OF VISIONING Provides common direction Focuses on students Focuses on the future Raises expectations Energy for change Human glue © American Student Achievement Institute, 1996 - 2000
  • The Vision StatementCORE CONVICTIONS What do we believe in our hearts  that all kids deserve? © Reynolds and Hines, 2000
  • The Vision StatementCORE CONVICTIONS If the adults were living What do we believe by these core convictions in our hearts  that every day, what would all kids deserve? they be doing? © Reynolds and Hines, 2000
  • Consider these areas . . . ENVIRONMENT GUIDANCE School Policy Behavior Management GUIDANCE Student Assistance Parent Involvement CURRICULUM Community Involvement Resources GUIDANCE LeadershipRELATIONSHIP TEACHING EXPECTATIONSCurriculum Content Faculty Expectations Instruction Parent Expectations Community Expectations Assessment Student Expectations Extra Time / Help
  • The Vision StatementCORE CONVICTIONS If the adults were living by these core convictions every What do we believe day, what would they be in our hearts  that doing? (attitudes & behaviors) all kids deserve?If the adults are living by their core convictions, what would the students be doing? © Reynolds and Hines, 2000
  • The Vision StatementCORE CONVICTIONS If the adults were living What do we believe by these core convictions in our hearts  that every day, what would all kids deserve? they be doing?If the adults are living by If the students were their core convictions, doing these things, what what would the students would be our school’s be doing? statistics? © Reynolds and Hines, 2000
  • Vision Statements
  • VISION. “PASHYA ME PARTHA RUPANI  “Partha see forms of me SATASOTHA SAHASTRASHAH hundreds and thousand see NANA VIDHANI DIVYANI different different ones NANA VARN AKRUTINI CHA.” multi-shaped, coloured ones.” VISION. The responsible leader inspires the team member through thousands of visions. Not only has he visions of totality but he also helps his colleagues to develop and see them. Vision inspires. Vision creates a mission. Then the team has to take actions to fulfil the mission which realises the vision. The vision is nothing but seeing thousand possible combinations and scenarios. A vision is beyond normal senses and a super-sense is essential to visualise. The responsible leader does not limit the discussion, interactions, development of alternatives and decisions just to logical approach but continuously encourages his team members to think creatively, differently, non-logically and see many visions of different combinations, forms and shapes. Thus in the presence of a responsible leader the atmosphere is charged with daring, innovative and creative spirit. The leader and the team combine like a vision and mission to ensure contribute results through proper actions. THE VISIONARY CONCEIVES THE IMPOSSIBLE. THE MISSIONARY MAKES IT POSSIBLE. KVRM 14
  • SUPER-VISION. “MAYAADHYAKSHEN PRAKRITIH  “Nature, under supervision of ‘me’ SOOYATE SA CHARAACHARAM produces moving, non-moving see! HETUNAANEN KAUNTEYA JAGAD VIPARIVARTATE”. because of the fact, this very one world revolves then, Kunti’s son.” SUPER-VISION. Simply owing to the presence of a responsible leader, things move and results occur. The overall view and supervision of the leader generates alertness, awareness and consciousness in all team member. People awake and perform excellently. A responsible leader see, observes, looks, perceives, conceives and sights all the possibilities, probabilities and optimalitys of different situations and integrates what has happened, what is happening and what is about to happen and visualises what is the best that must happen. That is a responsible leaders super-vision. When the leader shares his vision of overall benefit people get inspired and things just happen. Things occur in two ways. Some of them are fixed as durable changes. The responsible leader is aware of the transitory changes and prepares the team for the situation to derive benefits from these changes. Regarding durable changes the responsible leader ensures that a team adjust, accommodates, adopts and achieves in new situations. The presence of the responsible leader is the presence of total understanding and overall accountability. SUPERVISION IS SUPER-VISION. KVRM 15
  • KVRM 16
  • What is a Vision Statement?• A vision statement should be realistic and credible, well articulated and easily understood, appropriate, ambitious, and responsive to change.• It should orient the groups energies and serve as a guide to action.• It should be consistent with the learning communitys values.• In short, a vision should challenge and inspire the group to achieve its mission.
  • Technical Writing Tips for Writing the Vision:1. Visualize. Close your eyes and look at your own classroom or school. Do you know in your head what is there? Can you visualize interactions, the look of a room, and possible changes you might want to make in this environment? Practice visualization.
  • 2. Be specific. As you imagine your vision realize that other people can’t read your mind. Write your vision statement on paper. Next write down all of your thoughts related to your vision. Check to make sure your thoughts are all included in this vision. Make sure the most crucial thoughts are central to your mission.
  • 3. Be descriptive. Remember that you have more than one sense. Consider your vision from all your senses. Present your thoughts in a logical fashion so that the reader can follow your vision. For example, don’t talk about what students are doing and then jump to the principal’s office without a transition sentence .
  • 4. Be concise. Stick to material that is relevant and necessary for you to communicate your vision. Too long a vision will not be read or understood. How concisely and succinctly can you express this vision?
  • Examples based uponGuiding Principles of Vision Statements
  • Example #1• We believe that education must provide an environment in which all students are respected and have equal access and opportunity.
  • Example #2• We believe that education must be flexible and responsive to the changing needs of students, the community, and society.
  • Example #3• We believe that schools must provide a comprehensive, focused education which challenges the whole student.
  • • We believe Example #4 that schools must be accountable to the public, providing a quality education which makes efficient use of public resources.
  • For Real Transformation People First of Ontario Family Alliance Ontario Individualized Funding Coalition for Ontario Special Services at Home Provincial Coalition
  • Shared Vision: “A good life for people with disabilities as citizens within our communities”
  • ValuesThe Foundation of Transformation We share the following foundational values:  Citizenship  Self-determination  Inclusion and community engagement  Individual and family empowerment
  • Citizenship Citizenship embraces both self-determination and community Citizenship is: “a way of meeting one’s deepest needs, the need to belong; it gives voice and structure to the yearning to be part of something larger than ourselves.” Mark Kingwell
  • Self-determination Everybody has the right to self-determination — everyone is included. When we listen deeply, we enable individuals with the most significant disabilities to express their desires. Strong relationships help facilitate self-determination, which is why support networks are so important.
  • Social Inclusionand Community Engagement Inclusion is both a process and outcome that enables every citizen to participate and belong in all settings in their communities. A community learns as people are present. It cannot learn if people are absent. For people with disabilities, inclusion means realizing your dreams and desire for participation.
  • Social Inclusion andCommunity EngagementInclusion:“Belonging in schoolsand universities, inplaces of work andplaces of worship,in politics, art andcommerce;Belonging in family,community, andnation.” - Catherine Frazee
  • Individual and Family EmpowermentEmpowerment is a process whereby people gradually gain more control and participation in their lives. Empowerment and participation for individuals and families is enhanced when advocacy, independent planning & facilitation, allocation of funding, and direct services operate as . . . separate functions in the system.
  • Individual and Family EmpowermentA transformed systemmust shift power tovulnerable citizensby paying attentionto creating positivecircumstances forparticipation and the QuickTime™ and a TIFF (Uncompress ed) decompressor are needed to see this picture.expression of self-determination.
  • Principle SevenPeople First groups & autonomous familynetworks are supported and they have an importantadvocacy role to play in the transformed system.What is needed . . . Recognition and support for strong, autonomous family networks and People First groups. Increasing involvement of such groups in system planning and advocacy, as distinct from service provider involvement.
  • Real Transformation meansindividuals, families, networks, service providersand government create a New Storya New Storyabout how people with disabilities and theirfamilies are supported in their quest forself-determination and citizenship
  • We are Four Provincial Organizations that RepresentFamilies and Individuals with Disabilities Family Alliance Ontario Supporting the well being of persons with disabilities and their families, and promoting the inclusion of persons with disabilities into all aspects of community life. Individualized Funding Coalition for Ontario Supporting a coalition of individuals, families, and community agencies dedicated to self- determination, including having access to and control over funds for disability supports. People First of Ontario Supporting people who have been labeled to speak for themselves, to help each other, and to help make sure that they are heard. Special Services at Home Provincial Coalition Supporting a coalition of individuals, families, organizations and agencies dedicated to ensuring that families in Ontario receive the meaningful support they require through SSAH
  • THANK YOU