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Proving Trigonometric Identities
 

Proving Trigonometric Identities

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Some examples of using reciprocal, quotient, and Pythagorean identities to prove trigonometric identities.

Some examples of using reciprocal, quotient, and Pythagorean identities to prove trigonometric identities.

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110 of 33 previous next Post a comment

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  • Again, thanks all for leaving such nice comments, I'm so glad you found this useful... I made a quick video on the problem @jeserycabansag posted, it's handwritten and it's been a while since I've done one of these but I hope it will still be helpful... http://www.educreations.com/lesson/view/another-trig-equation-solved/9464621/?s=mUeOfh&ref=appemail
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  • @jeserycabansag sec + tan is the same as saying 1/cos + sin/cos
    find the common denominator which will be cos . treat it like a fraction . so 1+sin over the common denominator which is cos. since cos into cos times 1 = 1 . and cos into cos times sin = sin. therefore your answer will be 1+sin/cos
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  • @jeserycabansag
    separate them out like 1/cosx +sinx/cosx
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  • pls prove 1-(cos^2/1+sin)=sin
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  • pls prove 1+sin/cos=sec+tan
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    Proving Trigonometric Identities Proving Trigonometric Identities Presentation Transcript

    • TRIGONOMETRY Proving Trigonometric Identities
    • REVIEW Quotient Identities Reciprocal Identities Pythagorean Identities
    • Let’s start by working on the left side of the equation….
    • Rewrite the terms inside the second parenthesis by using the quotient identities
    • Simplify
    • To add the fractions inside the parenthesis, you must multiply by one to get common denominators
    • Now that you have the common denominators, add the numerators
    • Simplify
    • Since the left side of the equation is the same as the right side, you’ve successfully proven the identity!
    • On to the next problem….
    • Let’s start by working on the left side of the equation….
    • We’ll factor the terms using the difference of two perfect squares technique
    • Using the Pythagorean Identities the second set of parenthesis can be simplified
    • Since the left side of the equation is the same as the right side, you’ve successfully proven the identity!
    • On to the next problem….
    • Let’s start by working on the right side of the equation….
    • Multiply by 1 in the form of the conjugate of the denominator
    • Now, let’s distribute in the numerator….
    • … and simplify the denominator
    • ‘ Split’ the fraction and simplify
    • Use the Quotient and Reciprocal Identities to rewrite the fractions
    • And then by using the commutative property of addition…
    • … you’ve successfully proven the identity!
    • One more….
    • Let’s work on the left side of the equation…
    • Multiply each fraction by one to get the LCD
    • Now that the fractions have a common denominator, you can add the numerators
    • Simplify the numerator
    • Use the Pythagorean Identity to rewrite the denominator
    • Multiply the fraction by the constant
    • Use the Reciprocal Identity to rewrite the fraction to equal the expression on the right side of the equation