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Faculty Technology Day 2014 Breakout Session on The History and Future of Education
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Faculty Technology Day 2014 Breakout Session on The History and Future of Education

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#FacTechDay14 Agenda and Description: fordham.edu/facultytechday14 …

#FacTechDay14 Agenda and Description: fordham.edu/facultytechday14

Handouts and links from session can be found here: http://facultyedtechpd.wikispaces.com/History+and+Future+of+Education

PDF file (fonts are clearer in this version) can be found on the above wiki site

Published in: Education, Technology

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  • 1. Kristen Treglia Instructional Technologist Faculty Technology Day 2014 Fordham University
  • 2. Concerned about the challenges facing Future of Higher Education? Join us and be part of the solution. #FutureEd Cathy Davidson, Duke University and Coursera http://historyandfutureofeduction.wikispaces.com http://historyandfutureofeducation.wordpress.com
  • 3. Fran Blumberg, GSE Rhonda Bondie, GSE Alan Cafferkey, Director Faculty Technology Services Roxana Callejo Garcia, Director IT Strategy & Innovation Elizabeth Cornell, IT/Digital Humanities Fleur Eshghi, AVP Instructional Technology Steven D’Agustino, Director Online Learning Marshall George, GSE Jerry Green, Director Media Services Lindsay Karp, Instructional Technology Jane Suda, Library Debra McPhee, GSSS Dean Kristen Treglia, Instructional Technology
  • 4. Rhonda Bondie, GSE Elizabeth Cornell, IT/Digital Humanities Marshall George, GSE Lauri Goodkind, GSSS Lindsay Karp, Instructional Technology Mary Rothschild, Communications Dept. Kristen Treglia, Instructional Technology
  • 5. creative commons licensed (BY-SA) flickr photo by audreywatters
  • 6. Image by audreywatters
  • 7. It’s not a MOOC it’s a Movement creative commons licensed (BY-NC-ND) flickr photo by Matthew Field
  • 8. PART I a little background information
  • 9. Coined by Stephen Downes and George Siemens
  • 10. a pedagogy in which knowledge is not a destination but an ongoing activity At its heart, connectivism is the thesis that knowledge is distributed across a network of connections, and therefore that learning consists of the ability to construct and traverse those networks. Knowledge, therefore, is not acquired, as though it were a thing. It is not transmitted, as though it were some type of communication.
  • 11. Image by audreywatters
  • 12. creative commons licensed (BY) flickr photo by mathplourde
  • 13. Yuan, Li, and Stephen Powel
  • 14. Infographic by Edynco
  • 15. Yuan, Li, and Stephen Powel
  • 16. British Museum British Council British Library University of Bath University of Birmingham University of Bristol Cardiff University University of East Anglia University of Edinburgh University of Exeter University of Glasgow King's College London Lancaster University University of Leeds University of Leicester University of Liverpool Loughborough University Newcastle University University of Nottingham The Open University Queen’s University Belfast University of Reading University of Sheffield University of Southampton University of Strathclyde University of Warwick
  • 17. traditional lecture formats
  • 18. PART II
  • 19. History of Education Theories of Education and Learning Digital Literacies Innovations to Curriculum Innovations in Pedagogy and Assessment How Can We Implement Changes at an Institutional Level?
  • 20. Week 1
  • 21. 4000 1000 0 2000 Internet 1992
  • 22. Bruce Wellmen At this point, we appear to have a 19th century curriculum, 20th century buildings and organizations and 21st century students facing an undefined future. creative commons licensed (BY-NC) flickr photo by GrungeTextures
  • 23. Are we preparing students for their future? Or our past? creative commons licensed (BY) flickr photo by JD Hancock
  • 24. Week 2
  • 25. Week 3
  • 26. creative commons licensed (BY) flickr photo by Creativity103
  • 27. creative commons licensed (BY) flickr photo by Creativity103
  • 28. Digital and media literacy competencies, constitute core competencies of citizenship in the digital age creative commons licensed (BY-NC-SA) flickr photo by delphwynd:
  • 29. How do our students become digital citizens? creative commons licensed (BY-ND) flickr photo by HikingArtist.com
  • 30. Week 4
  • 31. How you teach shapes what you teach creative commons licensed (BY) flickr photo by || UggBoy♥UggGirl || PHOTO || WORLD || TRAVEL ||:
  • 32. creative commons licensed (BY-ND) flickr photo by aaron_anderer
  • 33. creative commons licensed (BY-NC-SA) flickr photo by Frédéric Harper
  • 34. Science and Art of TeachingScienc "Learning how to swim" by Frits Ahlefeldt-Laurvig Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs License
  • 35. Education, for most people, means trying to lead the child to resemble the typical adult of his society ... but for me and no one else, education means making creators... You have to make inventors, innovators—not conformists - Bringuier, 1980, p. 132
  • 36. Wikipedia Vygotsky's main work was in developmental psychology, and he proposed a theory of the development of higher cognitive functions in children that saw the emergence of the reasoning as emerging through practical activity in a social environment. During the earlier period of his career he argued that the development of reasoning was mediated by signs and symbols, and therefore contingent on cultural practices and language as well as on universal cognitive processes.
  • 37. We do not learn from experience... we learn from reflecting on experience - Mind in Society Failure is instructive. The person who really thinks learns quite as much from his failures as from his successes.
  • 38. Move from critical thinking to creative contribution creative commons licensed (BY-NC-SA) flickr photo by moleitau
  • 39. "The sweet you can eat between meals and not ruin your apetite" by Carl Jones Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs License
  • 40. Week 5
  • 41. "The narrow trail“ by Frits Ahlefeldt-Laurvig Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs License Week 6 Alliances Collaboration
  • 42. Image via LPS
  • 43. Diagram created by Bev Novak
  • 44. PART III
  • 45. &

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