Switches              CCNA Exploration Semester 3                                Chapter 2                  Warning – horr...
Topics Operation of 100/1000 Mbps Ethernet Switches and how they forward frames Configure a switch Basic security on a...
Semester 3                 LAN Design  Basic Switch                      Wireless  ConceptsVLANs                  STPVTP  ...
CSMA/CD reminder Shared   medium  Physical shared  cable or hub. Ethernet was  designed to work  with collisions. Uses ...
CSMA/CD reminder Device    needs to transmit. It “listens” for signals on the medium. If finds signals – it waits. If c...
No collisions Fully  switched network with full duplex  operation = no collisions. Higher bandwidth Ethernet does not de...
Switch Port Settings Auto  (default for UTP) - negotiates half/full  duplex with connected device. Full – sets full-dupl...
mdix auto Command     makes switch detect whether  cable is straight through or crossover and  compensate so you can use ...
Communication types reminder Unicast  – to a single host address e.g. most  user traffic: http, ftp, smtp etc. Broadcast...
Ethernet frame reminderIEEE 802.3 (Data link layer, MAC sublayer)7 bytes      1         6         6          2   46 to    ...
MAC address 48-bits written as 12 hexadecimal digits.  Format varies:  00-05-9A-3C-78-00, 00:05:9A:3C:78:00, or  0005.9A3...
MAC address Twoparts: Organizational Unique Identifier (OUI) and number assigned by manufacturer.                        ...
MAC address Twoparts: Organizational Unique Identifier (OUI) and number assigned by manufacturer.                        ...
MAC address Twoparts: Organizational Unique Identifier (OUI) and number assigned by manufacturer.                        ...
MAC address Twoparts: Organizational Unique Identifier (OUI) and number assigned by manufacturer.                        ...
Switch MAC Address Table Table   matches switch port with MAC address  of attached device Built by inspecting source MAC...
Collision domain Shared  medium – same collision domain. Collisions reduce throughput The more devices – the more colli...
How many collision domains?                                    1830 Sep 2012   S Ward Abingdon and              Witney Col...
How many collision domains?                     11                                    1930 Sep 2012   S Ward Abingdon and ...
Broadcast domains Layer   2 switches flood broadcasts. Devices linked by switches are in the same  broadcast domain. (W...
How many broadcast domains?                                    No VLANs                                               2130...
How many broadcast domains?                                    2230 Sep 2012   S Ward Abingdon and              Witney Col...
Network Latency NIC  delay – time taken to put signal on  medium and to interpret it on receipt. Propagation delay – tim...
Network congestion More   powerful PCs can send and process more  data at higher rates. Increasing use of remote resourc...
Control latency Choose   switches that can process data fast  enough for all ports to work simultaneously at  full bandwi...
Remove bottlenecks Use  a faster link. Have several links and use link aggregation  so that they act as one link with th...
Switch Forwarding Methods Cisco switches now all use Store and  Forward Some older switches used Cut Through – it  had t...
Store and forward Read  whole frame into buffer Discard any frames that are too short/long Perform cyclic redundancy ch...
Cut Through - Fast forward Read   start of frame as it comes in, as far as  end of destination MAC address (first 6 bytes...
Cut Through – Fragment Free Read  start of frame as it comes in, as far as  end of byte 64 Look up port and start forwar...
Symmetric and AsymmetricSwitching Symmetric    – all ports operate at same  bandwidth Asymmetric – different bandwidths ...
Port Based Buffering Each  incoming port has its own queue. Frames stay in buffer until outgoing port is  free. Frame d...
Shared Memory Buffering Allincoming frames go in a common buffer. Switch maps frame to destination port and  forwards it...
Layer 2 and Layer 3 Switching                           Traditional Ethernet                           switches work at la...
Layer 2 and Layer 3 SwitchingLayer 3 switches cancarry out the samefunctions as layer 2switches.They can also use layer3 I...
Switch CLI is similar to router Switch>enable Switch#config   t Switch(config)#int fa 0/1 Switch(config-if)#exit Swit...
Cisco Device manager Builtin web based GUI  for managing switch. Access via browser on  PC. Other GUI options  availabl...
Help, history etc. Help with ? Is similar to router. Error messages for bad commands – same. Command history – as for r...
Storage and start-up ROM,    Flash, NVRAM, RAM generally similar  to router. Boot loader, POST, load IOS from flash, loa...
Password recovery (2950)   Hold down mode switch during start-up   flash_init   load_helper   dir flash:   rename fla...
IP addressA   switch works without an IP address or any  other configuration that you give it. IP address lets you acces...
IP address S1(config)#int  vlan 99 ( or another VLAN) S1(config-if)#ip address 192.168.1.2  255.255.255.0 S1(config-if)...
IP address S1(config)#int fa 0/18 (or other interface) S1(config-if)#switchport mode access S1(config-if)#switchport ac...
Default gateway S1(config)#ip   default-gateway 192.168.1.1 Justlike a PC, the switch needs to know the  address of its ...
Web based GUI SW1(config)#ip    http server SW1(config)#ip http authentication enable (uses enable secret/password for ...
MAC address table (CAM) Static:  Inbuilt or configured, do not time out. Dynamic:  Learned,  Time out  300 sec. Note th...
Set a static address SW1(config)#mac-address-table  static 000c.7671.10b4 vlan 2 interface fa0/6                         ...
Save configuration Copy  run start Copy running-config startup-config This assumes that running-config is coming  from ...
Back up copy   startup-config flash:backupJan08 You could go back to this version later if  necessary. copy system:runn...
Login PasswordsLine con 0             Service password-encryptionPassword cisco         Line con 0Login                  P...
Banners banner  motd “Shut down 5pm Friday” banner login “No unauthorised access” Motd will show first. Delimiter can ...
Secure Shell SSH Similar interface to Telnet. Encrypts data for transmission. SW1(config)#line vty 0 15 SW1(config-lin...
Common security attacks MAC    Address Flooding: send huge numbers  of frames with fake source MAC addresses  and fill up...
Cisco Discovery Protocol CDP    is enabled by default. Switch it off unless it is really needed. It is a security risk....
More security Use   strong passwords. Even these can be found in time so change  them regularly. Using access control l...
Port security Configure    each port to accept     One MAC address only     A small group of MAC addresses Frames  fro...
Static secure MAC address Staticsecure MAC addresses: Manually configured in interface config mode switchport port-secu...
Dynamic secure MAC address Learned  dynamically Default – learn one address. Put in MAC address table Not in running c...
Sticky secure MAC address Dynamically   learned Choose how many can be learned, default 1. Put in running configuration...
Sticky secure MAC address SW1(config-if)#switchport mode access SW1(config-if)#switchport port-security SW1(config-if)#...
Violation modes Violation  occurs if a device with the wrong  MAC address attempts to connect. Shutdown mode is default....
Check port security show  port-security int fa 0/4  to see settings on a particular port Show port-security address  to ...
Interface range Switch(config)#interface    range fa0/1 - 20 Switch(config-if-range)#A useful command if you want to put...
The End30 Sep 2012   S Ward Abingdon and Witney College       64
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Chapter 2 switches

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Chapter 2 switches

  1. 1. Switches CCNA Exploration Semester 3 Chapter 2 Warning – horribly long!30 Sep 2012 S Ward Abingdon and Witney College 1
  2. 2. Topics Operation of 100/1000 Mbps Ethernet Switches and how they forward frames Configure a switch Basic security on a switch 2 30 Sep 2012 S Ward Abingdon and Witney College
  3. 3. Semester 3 LAN Design Basic Switch Wireless ConceptsVLANs STPVTP Inter-VLAN routing 330 Sep 2012 S Ward Abingdon and Witney College
  4. 4. CSMA/CD reminder Shared medium Physical shared cable or hub. Ethernet was designed to work with collisions. Uses carrier sense multiple access collision detection. 4 30 Sep 2012 S Ward Abingdon and Witney College
  5. 5. CSMA/CD reminder Device needs to transmit. It “listens” for signals on the medium. If finds signals – it waits. If clear – it sends. Carry on listening. If it receives while sending the first 64 bytes of the frame then collision. Stop sending frame, send jam signal. Wait for random time (backoff) Try again – listen for signals etc. 5 30 Sep 2012 S Ward Abingdon and Witney College
  6. 6. No collisions Fully switched network with full duplex operation = no collisions. Higher bandwidth Ethernet does not define collisions – must be fully switched. Cable length limited if CSMA/CD needed. Fibre optic – always fully switched, full duplex. (Shared medium must use half duplex in order to detect collisions.) 6 30 Sep 2012 S Ward Abingdon and Witney College
  7. 7. Switch Port Settings Auto (default for UTP) - negotiates half/full duplex with connected device. Full – sets full-duplex mode Half - sets half-duplex mode Auto is fine if both devices are using it. Potential problem if switch uses it and other device does not. Switch defaults to half. Full one end and half the other – errors. 7 30 Sep 2012 S Ward Abingdon and Witney College
  8. 8. mdix auto Command makes switch detect whether cable is straight through or crossover and compensate so you can use either. Depends on IOS version Enabled by default from 12.2(18)SE on Disabled from 12.1(14)EA1 to 12.2(18)SE Not available in earlier versions 8 30 Sep 2012 S Ward Abingdon and Witney College
  9. 9. Communication types reminder Unicast – to a single host address e.g. most user traffic: http, ftp, smtp etc. Broadcast – addressed to all hosts on the network e.g. ARP requests. Multicast – to a group of devices e.g. routers running EIGRP, group of hosts using videoconferencing. IP addresses have first octet in range 224 – 239. 9 30 Sep 2012 S Ward Abingdon and Witney College
  10. 10. Ethernet frame reminderIEEE 802.3 (Data link layer, MAC sublayer)7 bytes 1 6 6 2 46 to 4 1500Preamble Start of Destination Source Length 802.2 Frame frame address address /type header check delimiter and data sequence Frame header data trailer  802.2 is data link layer LLC sublayer 10 30 Sep 2012 S Ward Abingdon and Witney College
  11. 11. MAC address 48-bits written as 12 hexadecimal digits. Format varies: 00-05-9A-3C-78-00, 00:05:9A:3C:78:00, or 0005.9A3C.7800. MAC address can be permanently encoded into a ROM chip on a NIC - burned in address (BIA). Some manufacturers allow the MAC address to be modified locally. 11 30 Sep 2012 S Ward Abingdon and Witney College
  12. 12. MAC address Twoparts: Organizational Unique Identifier (OUI) and number assigned by manufacturer. MAC address OUI Vendor number 1 bit 1 bit 22 bits 24 bits Broadcast Local OUI number Vendor assigns Set if broadcast or multicast 12 30 Sep 2012 S Ward Abingdon and Witney College
  13. 13. MAC address Twoparts: Organizational Unique Identifier (OUI) and number assigned by manufacturer. MAC address OUI Vendor number 1 bit 1 bit 22 bits 24 bits Broadcast Local OUI number Vendor assigns Set if vendor number can be changed 13 30 Sep 2012 S Ward Abingdon and Witney College
  14. 14. MAC address Twoparts: Organizational Unique Identifier (OUI) and number assigned by manufacturer. MAC address OUI Vendor number 1 bit 1 bit 22 bits 24 bits Broadcast Local OUI number Vendor assigns Allocated to vendor by IEEE 14 30 Sep 2012 S Ward Abingdon and Witney College
  15. 15. MAC address Twoparts: Organizational Unique Identifier (OUI) and number assigned by manufacturer. MAC address OUI Vendor number 1 bit 1 bit 22 bits 24 bits Broadcast Local OUI number Vendor assigns Unique identifier for port on device 15 30 Sep 2012 S Ward Abingdon and Witney College
  16. 16. Switch MAC Address Table Table matches switch port with MAC address of attached device Built by inspecting source MAC address of incoming frames Destination MAC address checked against table, frame sent through correct port If not in table, frame flooded Broadcasts flooded 16 30 Sep 2012 S Ward Abingdon and Witney College
  17. 17. Collision domain Shared medium – same collision domain. Collisions reduce throughput The more devices – the more collisions Hub – maybe 60% of bandwidth available Switch (+ full duplex) dedicated link each way 100% bandwidth in each direction Link regarded as an individual collision domain if you are asked to count them. 17 30 Sep 2012 S Ward Abingdon and Witney College
  18. 18. How many collision domains? 1830 Sep 2012 S Ward Abingdon and Witney College
  19. 19. How many collision domains? 11 1930 Sep 2012 S Ward Abingdon and Witney College
  20. 20. Broadcast domains Layer 2 switches flood broadcasts. Devices linked by switches are in the same broadcast domain. (We ignore VLANs here – they come later.) A layer 3 device (router) splits up broadcast domains, does not forward broadcasts Destination MAC address for broadcast is all 1s, that is FF:FF:FF:FF:FF:FF 20 30 Sep 2012 S Ward Abingdon and Witney College
  21. 21. How many broadcast domains? No VLANs 2130 Sep 2012 S Ward Abingdon and Witney College
  22. 22. How many broadcast domains? 2230 Sep 2012 S Ward Abingdon and Witney College
  23. 23. Network Latency NIC delay – time taken to put signal on medium and to interpret it on receipt. Propagation delay – time spent travelling on medium Latency from intermediate devices e.g. switch or router. Depends on number and type of devices. Routers add more latency than switches. 23 30 Sep 2012 S Ward Abingdon and Witney College
  24. 24. Network congestion More powerful PCs can send and process more data at higher rates. Increasing use of remote resources (servers, Internet) generates more traffic. More broadcasts, more congestion. Applications make more use of advanced graphics, video etc. Need more bandwidth. Splitting collision and broadcast domains helps. 24 30 Sep 2012 S Ward Abingdon and Witney College
  25. 25. Control latency Choose switches that can process data fast enough for all ports to work simultaneously at full bandwidth. Use switches rather than routers where possible. But – balance this against need to split up broadcast domains. 25 30 Sep 2012 S Ward Abingdon and Witney College
  26. 26. Remove bottlenecks Use a faster link. Have several links and use link aggregation so that they act as one link with the combined bandwidth. 26 30 Sep 2012 S Ward Abingdon and Witney College
  27. 27. Switch Forwarding Methods Cisco switches now all use Store and Forward Some older switches used Cut Through – it had two variants: Fast Forward and Fragment Free 27 30 Sep 2012 S Ward Abingdon and Witney College
  28. 28. Store and forward Read whole frame into buffer Discard any frames that are too short/long Perform cyclic redundancy check (CRC) and discard any frames with errors Find correct port and forward frame. Allows QoS checks Allows entry and exit at different bandwidths 28 30 Sep 2012 S Ward Abingdon and Witney College
  29. 29. Cut Through - Fast forward Read start of frame as it comes in, as far as end of destination MAC address (first 6 bytes after start delimiter) Look up port and start forwarding while remainder of frame is still coming in. No checks or discarding of bad frames Entry and exit must be same bandwidth Lowest latency 29 30 Sep 2012 S Ward Abingdon and Witney College
  30. 30. Cut Through – Fragment Free Read start of frame as it comes in, as far as end of byte 64 Look up port and start forwarding while remainder of frame (if any) is still coming in. Discards collision fragments (too short) but other bad frames are forwarded Entry and exit must be same bandwidth Compromise between low latency and checks 30 30 Sep 2012 S Ward Abingdon and Witney College
  31. 31. Symmetric and AsymmetricSwitching Symmetric – all ports operate at same bandwidth Asymmetric – different bandwidths used, e.g. server or uplink has greater bandwidth Requires store and forward operation with buffering. Most switches now are asymmetric to allow flexibility. 31 30 Sep 2012 S Ward Abingdon and Witney College
  32. 32. Port Based Buffering Each incoming port has its own queue. Frames stay in buffer until outgoing port is free. Frame destined for busy outgoing port can hold up all the others even if their outgoing ports are free. Each incoming port has a fixed and limited amount of memory. 32 30 Sep 2012 S Ward Abingdon and Witney College
  33. 33. Shared Memory Buffering Allincoming frames go in a common buffer. Switch maps frame to destination port and forwards it when port is free. Frames do not hold each other up. Flexible use of memory allows larger frames. Important for asymmetric switching where some ports work faster than others. 33 30 Sep 2012 S Ward Abingdon and Witney College
  34. 34. Layer 2 and Layer 3 Switching Traditional Ethernet switches work at layer 2. They use MAC addresses to make forwarding decisions. They do not look at layer 3 information. 3430 Sep 2012 S Ward Abingdon and Witney College
  35. 35. Layer 2 and Layer 3 SwitchingLayer 3 switches cancarry out the samefunctions as layer 2switches.They can also use layer3 IP addresses to routebetween networks.The can control thespread of broadcasts. 35 30 Sep 2012 S Ward Abingdon and Witney College
  36. 36. Switch CLI is similar to router Switch>enable Switch#config t Switch(config)#int fa 0/1 Switch(config-if)#exit Switch(config)#line con 0 Switch(config-line)#end Switch#disable Switch> 36 30 Sep 2012 S Ward Abingdon and Witney College
  37. 37. Cisco Device manager Builtin web based GUI for managing switch. Access via browser on PC. Other GUI options available but need to be downloaded/bought. 37 30 Sep 2012 S Ward Abingdon and Witney College
  38. 38. Help, history etc. Help with ? Is similar to router. Error messages for bad commands – same. Command history – as for router. Up arrow or Ctrl + P for previous Down arrow or Ctrl + N for next Each mode has its own buffer holding 10 commands by default. 38 30 Sep 2012 S Ward Abingdon and Witney College
  39. 39. Storage and start-up ROM, Flash, NVRAM, RAM generally similar to router. Boot loader, POST, load IOS from flash, load configuration file. Similar idea to router. Some difference in detail. Boot loader lets you re-install IOS or recover from password loss. 39 30 Sep 2012 S Ward Abingdon and Witney College
  40. 40. Password recovery (2950) Hold down mode switch during start-up flash_init load_helper dir flash: rename flash:config.text flash:config.old boot Continue with the configuration dialog? [yes/no] : N rename flash:config.old flash:config.text copy flash:config.text system:running-config Configure new passwords 4030 Sep 2012 S Ward Abingdon and Witney College
  41. 41. IP addressA switch works without an IP address or any other configuration that you give it. IP address lets you access the switch remotely by Telnet, SSH or browser. Switch needs only one IP address. It goes on a virtual (VLAN) interface. VLAN 1 is the default but is not very secure for management. 41 30 Sep 2012 S Ward Abingdon and Witney College
  42. 42. IP address S1(config)#int vlan 99 ( or another VLAN) S1(config-if)#ip address 192.168.1.2 255.255.255.0 S1(config-if)#no shutdown S1(config-if)#exit All very well, but by default all the ports are associated with VLAN 1. VLAN 99 needs to have a port to use. 42 30 Sep 2012 S Ward Abingdon and Witney College
  43. 43. IP address S1(config)#int fa 0/18 (or other interface) S1(config-if)#switchport mode access S1(config-if)#switchport access vlan 99 S1(config-if)#exit S1(config)# Messages to and from the switch IP address can pass via port fa 0/18. Other ports could be added if necessary. 43 30 Sep 2012 S Ward Abingdon and Witney College
  44. 44. Default gateway S1(config)#ip default-gateway 192.168.1.1 Justlike a PC, the switch needs to know the address of its local router to exchange messages with other networks. Note global configuration mode. 44 30 Sep 2012 S Ward Abingdon and Witney College
  45. 45. Web based GUI SW1(config)#ip http server SW1(config)#ip http authentication enable (uses enable secret/password for access) SW1(config)#ip http authentication local SW1(config)#username admin password cisco (log in using this username and password) 45 30 Sep 2012 S Ward Abingdon and Witney College
  46. 46. MAC address table (CAM) Static: Inbuilt or configured, do not time out. Dynamic: Learned, Time out 300 sec. Note that VLAN is included in table. 46 30 Sep 2012 S Ward Abingdon and Witney College
  47. 47. Set a static address SW1(config)#mac-address-table static 000c.7671.10b4 vlan 2 interface fa0/6 47 30 Sep 2012 S Ward Abingdon and Witney College
  48. 48. Save configuration Copy run start Copy running-config startup-config This assumes that running-config is coming from RAM and startup-config is going in NVRAM (file is actually in flash). Full version gives path. Copy system:running-config flash:startup- config 48 30 Sep 2012 S Ward Abingdon and Witney College
  49. 49. Back up copy startup-config flash:backupJan08 You could go back to this version later if necessary. copy system:running-config tftp://192.168.1.8/sw1config copy nvram:startup-config tftp://192.168.1.8/sw1config (or try copy run tftp and wait for prompts) 49 30 Sep 2012 S Ward Abingdon and Witney College
  50. 50. Login PasswordsLine con 0 Service password-encryptionPassword cisco Line con 0Login Password 7 030752180500Line vty 0 15 Login Line vty 0 15Password cisco Password 7 1511021f0725Login Login 50 30 Sep 2012 S Ward Abingdon and Witney College
  51. 51. Banners banner motd “Shut down 5pm Friday” banner login “No unauthorised access” Motd will show first. Delimiter can be “ or # or any character not in message. 51 30 Sep 2012 S Ward Abingdon and Witney College
  52. 52. Secure Shell SSH Similar interface to Telnet. Encrypts data for transmission. SW1(config)#line vty 0 15 SW1(config-line)#transport input SSH Use SSH or telnet or all if you want both. Default is telnet. For SSH you must configure host domain and generate RSA key pair. 52 30 Sep 2012 S Ward Abingdon and Witney College
  53. 53. Common security attacks MAC Address Flooding: send huge numbers of frames with fake source MAC addresses and fill up MAC address table. Switch then floods all frames. DHCP spoofing: rogue server allocates fake IP address and default gateway, all remote traffic sent to attacker. (Use DHCP snooping feature to mark ports as trustworthy or not.) 53 30 Sep 2012 S Ward Abingdon and Witney College
  54. 54. Cisco Discovery Protocol CDP is enabled by default. Switch it off unless it is really needed. It is a security risk. Frames could be captured using Wireshark (or the older Ethereal). 54 30 Sep 2012 S Ward Abingdon and Witney College
  55. 55. More security Use strong passwords. Even these can be found in time so change them regularly. Using access control lists (semester 4) you can control which devices are able to access vty lines. Network security tools for audits and penetration testing. 55 30 Sep 2012 S Ward Abingdon and Witney College
  56. 56. Port security Configure each port to accept  One MAC address only  A small group of MAC addresses Frames from other MAC addresses are not forwarded. By default, the port will shut down if the wrong device connects. It has to be brought up again manually. 56 30 Sep 2012 S Ward Abingdon and Witney College
  57. 57. Static secure MAC address Staticsecure MAC addresses: Manually configured in interface config mode switchport port-security mac-address 000c.7259.0a63 interface fa 0/4 Stored in MAC address table In running configuration Can be saved with the rest of the configuration. 57 30 Sep 2012 S Ward Abingdon and Witney College
  58. 58. Dynamic secure MAC address Learned dynamically Default – learn one address. Put in MAC address table Not in running configuration Not saved, not there when switch restarts. SW1(config-if)#switchport mode access SW1(config-if)#switchport port-security 58 30 Sep 2012 S Ward Abingdon and Witney College
  59. 59. Sticky secure MAC address Dynamically learned Choose how many can be learned, default 1. Put in running configuration Saved if you save running configuration and still there when switch restarts. Existing dynamic address(es) will convert to sticky if you enable sticky learning. 59 30 Sep 2012 S Ward Abingdon and Witney College
  60. 60. Sticky secure MAC address SW1(config-if)#switchport mode access SW1(config-if)#switchport port-security SW1(config-if)#switchport port-security maximum 4 SW1(config-if)#switchport port-security mac-address sticky 60 30 Sep 2012 S Ward Abingdon and Witney College
  61. 61. Violation modes Violation occurs if a device with the wrong MAC address attempts to connect. Shutdown mode is default. Protect mode just prevents traffic. Restrict mode sends error message to network management software. (I think these last two are the right way round…) 61 30 Sep 2012 S Ward Abingdon and Witney College
  62. 62. Check port security show port-security int fa 0/4 to see settings on a particular port Show port-security address to see the table of secure MAC addresses Ifyou don’t need to use a port: shutdown 62 30 Sep 2012 S Ward Abingdon and Witney College
  63. 63. Interface range Switch(config)#interface range fa0/1 - 20 Switch(config-if-range)#A useful command if you want to put the same configuration on several interfaces. 63 30 Sep 2012 S Ward Abingdon and Witney College
  64. 64. The End30 Sep 2012 S Ward Abingdon and Witney College 64
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