Your SlideShare is downloading. ×
Open Source, the ILS, and the Opportunity of Engagement
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in...5
×

Thanks for flagging this SlideShare!

Oops! An error has occurred.

×
Saving this for later? Get the SlideShare app to save on your phone or tablet. Read anywhere, anytime – even offline.
Text the download link to your phone
Standard text messaging rates apply

Open Source, the ILS, and the Opportunity of Engagement

2,105
views

Published on

Published in: Education, Technology

0 Comments
4 Likes
Statistics
Notes
  • Be the first to comment

No Downloads
Views
Total Views
2,105
On Slideshare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
1
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
40
Comments
0
Likes
4
Embeds 0
No embeds

Report content
Flagged as inappropriate Flag as inappropriate
Flag as inappropriate

Select your reason for flagging this presentation as inappropriate.

Cancel
No notes for slide

Transcript

  • 1. Open Source, the ILS, and the  Opportunity of Engagement Randy Metcalfe eIFL.net
  • 2. In this talk • Overview of what FOSS is and its possible  significance • FOSS in/for libraries • Integrated Library Systems (ILS) • Engagement • eIFL‐FOSS ILS project • Questions and contact details
  • 3. Randy Metcalfe • eIFL‐FOSS Program Manager • eIFL.net (Electronic Information For Libraries)  • Working with national library consortia in 48+  developing and transition countries • eIFL.net programs: IP, OA, FOSS, Negotiations,  Consortium Building, Knowledge Sharing http://www.eifl.net/
  • 4. FOSS Free and Open Source Software (FOSS): • Freedom to run the program for any purpose • Freedom to study how the program works and adapt it  to your needs • Freedom to redistribute copies so you can help your  neighbour • Freedom to improve the program and release your  improvements to the public so that the whole  community benefits
  • 5. It starts with a licence • Software begins as text • Text is copyright • A copyright licence sets out the conditions of  use • A permissive licence can be crafted to sustain  and promote the freedom to run, study,  adapt, redistribute, and modify the original  text or source code
  • 6. It becomes a community • FOSS is software released under a permissive licence • FOSS is usually developed in an open and communal  fashion • FOSS may be accessed and deployed at no cost • FOSS is typically supported by a community of users  and developers • Enterprise‐level FOSS is also typically supported by  companies, small and large, that will provide support  contracts
  • 7. The significance of FOSS • Access to the source code enables us to learn from  the work of others • Freedom to modify the code enables us to build on  the work of others • Freedom to distribute our modified code allows the  process of learning and growth to be iterative • Natural tendency toward communal development to  leverage efficiency from shared goals
  • 8. FOSS in Libraries • Web servers (Apache) • Databases (MySQL, PostgreSQL) • Operating system (Linux) • Web browser (Firefox) • Content management system (Drupal, Plone) • Learning management system (Moodle, Sakai)
  • 9. FOSS for Libraries • Institutional repositories (Dspace, ePrints,  Fedora) • Digital collections (Greenstone) • Integrated library system (Evergreen, Koha,  NewGenLib, ABCD) • Resolvers (CUFTS) • OPAC (VuFind, Blacklight, Fac‐Back‐Opac)
  • 10. FOSS impact on libraries engagement use
  • 11. Integrated Library System • Cornerstone of any modern automated library • Cataloguing • Circulation • Acquisitions • Patron management • Serials • OPAC • Prominent proprietary offerings available • Licence fee • Limited flexibility • Pace of change • Support
  • 12. Attraction of a FOSS ILS • Cost • No licence fee  • Communal and/or commercial support • Vibrant user community of librarians helping each  other • Commercial support for migration and maintenance, if  required • Localization (i.e. language of interface) • Adaptability
  • 13. Challenge of a FOSS ILS • Cost • Real costs (e.g. staff, hardware) do not change • May require greater staff commitment (depending on  level of engagement) • Communal support may require new skills • Commercial support limited? • Adaptability: “We are librarians, not software  developers!” • Change costs
  • 14. Engagement • Full engagement as a co‐developer of your ILS  is not for everyone, nor need it be • Find the level of engagement that is right for  you • Your level of engagement is not tied to your  use of commercial support
  • 15. Tips for engagement 1. You are a member of a community 2. Be a patient, participant‐observer 3. Read the available documentation 4. Join the user mailing list and read the mail  archive 5. Learn how to ask a question first 6. Help others when you can
  • 16. eIFL‐FOSS: the program • Advocates FOSS use in libraries • Raises awareness and understanding of FOSS • Facilitates engagement with FOSS development  communities • Undertakes projects to deploy FOSS solutions,  enhance skills, and build capacity
  • 17. Projects • ILS project • Greenstone Support Network • LTSP documentation  • Skills and tools enhancement workshops
  • 18. ILS Project • Piloting and evaluating 2 FOSS ILSs (Koha and  Evergreen) in 7 countries: • Armenia • Georgia • Palestine • Nepal • Mali • Malawi • Zimbabwe
  • 19. Engagement in practice • Email discussion lists • IRC channels • Localization • Problem solving • Ongoing support
  • 20. Teamwork
  • 21. Localization Fundamental Scientific Library of the National Academy of Sciences, Armenia
  • 22. Project learning points • Learning how to ask for help on the email lists • Cultural barriers • Linguistic barriers • Technical limitations • Some skills and tools use in the FOSS community are  taken for granted • Easier to gain new skills as part of a team • Contributing code developments can be even harder  than learning how to ask for help • Time is a finite resource
  • 23. Takeaways • Knowledge of what FOSS is and what it means • Appreciation that FOSS has a key role in and  for libraries • There are viable FOSS ILSs • You determine your own level of engagement  with a FOSS ILS project • You are part of community, and there is help  available if you ask for it (nicely)
  • 24. Questions?
  • 25. Further information • eIFL.net http://www.eifl.net/ • eIFL‐FOSS http://www.eifl.net/cps/sections/services/eifl‐foss • Blog http://www.eifl.net/cps/sections/services/eifl‐foss/foss‐blog • Email list http://www.eifl.net:8080/mailman/listinfo/eiflfoss • Email: randy.metcalfe[@]eifl.net Photo credits: all photos by Randy Metcalfe, used with permission.

×