Open Source, the ILS, and the Opportunity of Engagement
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in...5
×
 

Open Source, the ILS, and the Opportunity of Engagement

on

  • 2,854 views

 

Statistics

Views

Total Views
2,854
Views on SlideShare
2,824
Embed Views
30

Actions

Likes
4
Downloads
40
Comments
0

3 Embeds 30

https://connect.ubc.ca 23
http://www3.nelinet.net 6
http://www.slideshare.net 1

Accessibility

Categories

Upload Details

Uploaded via as Adobe PDF

Usage Rights

© All Rights Reserved

Report content

Flagged as inappropriate Flag as inappropriate
Flag as inappropriate

Select your reason for flagging this presentation as inappropriate.

Cancel
  • Full Name Full Name Comment goes here.
    Are you sure you want to
    Your message goes here
    Processing…
Post Comment
Edit your comment

Open Source, the ILS, and the Opportunity of Engagement Open Source, the ILS, and the Opportunity of Engagement Presentation Transcript

  • Open Source, the ILS, and the  Opportunity of Engagement Randy Metcalfe eIFL.net
  • In this talk • Overview of what FOSS is and its possible  significance • FOSS in/for libraries • Integrated Library Systems (ILS) • Engagement • eIFL‐FOSS ILS project • Questions and contact details
  • Randy Metcalfe • eIFL‐FOSS Program Manager • eIFL.net (Electronic Information For Libraries)  • Working with national library consortia in 48+  developing and transition countries • eIFL.net programs: IP, OA, FOSS, Negotiations,  Consortium Building, Knowledge Sharing http://www.eifl.net/
  • FOSS Free and Open Source Software (FOSS): • Freedom to run the program for any purpose • Freedom to study how the program works and adapt it  to your needs • Freedom to redistribute copies so you can help your  neighbour • Freedom to improve the program and release your  improvements to the public so that the whole  community benefits
  • It starts with a licence • Software begins as text • Text is copyright • A copyright licence sets out the conditions of  use • A permissive licence can be crafted to sustain  and promote the freedom to run, study,  adapt, redistribute, and modify the original  text or source code
  • It becomes a community • FOSS is software released under a permissive licence • FOSS is usually developed in an open and communal  fashion • FOSS may be accessed and deployed at no cost • FOSS is typically supported by a community of users  and developers • Enterprise‐level FOSS is also typically supported by  companies, small and large, that will provide support  contracts
  • The significance of FOSS • Access to the source code enables us to learn from  the work of others • Freedom to modify the code enables us to build on  the work of others • Freedom to distribute our modified code allows the  process of learning and growth to be iterative • Natural tendency toward communal development to  leverage efficiency from shared goals
  • FOSS in Libraries • Web servers (Apache) • Databases (MySQL, PostgreSQL) • Operating system (Linux) • Web browser (Firefox) • Content management system (Drupal, Plone) • Learning management system (Moodle, Sakai)
  • FOSS for Libraries • Institutional repositories (Dspace, ePrints,  Fedora) • Digital collections (Greenstone) • Integrated library system (Evergreen, Koha,  NewGenLib, ABCD) • Resolvers (CUFTS) • OPAC (VuFind, Blacklight, Fac‐Back‐Opac)
  • FOSS impact on libraries engagement use
  • Integrated Library System • Cornerstone of any modern automated library • Cataloguing • Circulation • Acquisitions • Patron management • Serials • OPAC • Prominent proprietary offerings available • Licence fee • Limited flexibility • Pace of change • Support
  • Attraction of a FOSS ILS • Cost • No licence fee  • Communal and/or commercial support • Vibrant user community of librarians helping each  other • Commercial support for migration and maintenance, if  required • Localization (i.e. language of interface) • Adaptability
  • Challenge of a FOSS ILS • Cost • Real costs (e.g. staff, hardware) do not change • May require greater staff commitment (depending on  level of engagement) • Communal support may require new skills • Commercial support limited? • Adaptability: “We are librarians, not software  developers!” • Change costs
  • Engagement • Full engagement as a co‐developer of your ILS  is not for everyone, nor need it be • Find the level of engagement that is right for  you • Your level of engagement is not tied to your  use of commercial support
  • Tips for engagement 1. You are a member of a community 2. Be a patient, participant‐observer 3. Read the available documentation 4. Join the user mailing list and read the mail  archive 5. Learn how to ask a question first 6. Help others when you can
  • eIFL‐FOSS: the program • Advocates FOSS use in libraries • Raises awareness and understanding of FOSS • Facilitates engagement with FOSS development  communities • Undertakes projects to deploy FOSS solutions,  enhance skills, and build capacity
  • Projects • ILS project • Greenstone Support Network • LTSP documentation  • Skills and tools enhancement workshops
  • ILS Project • Piloting and evaluating 2 FOSS ILSs (Koha and  Evergreen) in 7 countries: • Armenia • Georgia • Palestine • Nepal • Mali • Malawi • Zimbabwe
  • Engagement in practice • Email discussion lists • IRC channels • Localization • Problem solving • Ongoing support
  • Teamwork
  • Localization Fundamental Scientific Library of the National Academy of Sciences, Armenia
  • Project learning points • Learning how to ask for help on the email lists • Cultural barriers • Linguistic barriers • Technical limitations • Some skills and tools use in the FOSS community are  taken for granted • Easier to gain new skills as part of a team • Contributing code developments can be even harder  than learning how to ask for help • Time is a finite resource
  • Takeaways • Knowledge of what FOSS is and what it means • Appreciation that FOSS has a key role in and  for libraries • There are viable FOSS ILSs • You determine your own level of engagement  with a FOSS ILS project • You are part of community, and there is help  available if you ask for it (nicely)
  • Questions?
  • Further information • eIFL.net http://www.eifl.net/ • eIFL‐FOSS http://www.eifl.net/cps/sections/services/eifl‐foss • Blog http://www.eifl.net/cps/sections/services/eifl‐foss/foss‐blog • Email list http://www.eifl.net:8080/mailman/listinfo/eiflfoss • Email: randy.metcalfe[@]eifl.net Photo credits: all photos by Randy Metcalfe, used with permission.