Fuller Disclosure:  Getting More Collections into the Network Flow  Karen Smith-Yoshimura OCLC Programs and Research NELIN...
“ It is not the strongest of the species that survives, nor the most intelligent  that survives.  It is the one that is th...
Collections Grid A framework for representing content Published Content • Books • Journals • Newspapers • Gov. docs • CD, ...
David Lewis (Dean of University Library, Indiana University Purdue) predicts in 20 years less than 50% of a library’s inve...
  Recent attention given to hidden collections   <ul><li>Council on Library and Information Resources: Cataloging Hidden S...
Funding for streamlined processes
http://www.loc.gov/bibliographic-future/news/lcwg-ontherecord-jan08-final.pdf
Enhance access to rare, unique, and other special hidden materials   <ul><li>2.1.1 Make the discovery of rare, unique and ...
Image: from the end of “Raiders of the Lost Ark” Who knows what’s hidden in our  collections?
What percentage of your collection do you estimate has not been adequately described – and is unlikely to be described wit...
Princeton University Archives Even processed materials need description
 
Yale University
Where do you begin an online search for information on a topic? College Students’ Perceptions of Libraries and Information...
Be where the users go Image: informationarchitects.jp/web-trend-map-2008-beta/
Image:  http://hello.eboy.com/eboy/wp-content/uploads/shop/EBY_FooBar_35t.png
Discovery happens elsewhere – Be  there!
 
 
So how much metadata is really needed?
Diffusion
 
Relationships and controlled vocabularies contributed by all  catalogers of all editions Concentration
 
 
Where the users are
 
 
Going mobile, part of diffusion
<ul><li>Concentration </li></ul><ul><li>Diffusion </li></ul><ul><li>Aggregation of data at the network level </li></ul><ul...
Yale University Archives vault Digitize for access
Don’t get further behind Trinity College Dublin
University of Aberdeen Stop thinking about item-level description
 
Quantity over quality Images: labs.live.com/photosynth/
Images: Harry Ransom Center, UT Austin
Combine approaches
Do it   all Images: A View to Hugh (blog)
Share your findings Images: A View to Hugh (blog) www.lib.unc.edu/blogs/morton/
Images: various
Preserve right to reuse/remix
Work with partners to get what you want
Describing collections <ul><li>How much detail is necessary – if discovery will happen elsewhere?  </li></ul><ul><li>… onl...
The changing context for metadata management <ul><li>B.W. (Before the Web) </li></ul><ul><li>For finding and managing  lib...
Most common crosswalks between schemas used (from 2008 survey of RLG Partners) 63% of 100 respondents convert between MARC...
Fuller disclosure! Get discovered! <ul><li>Digitize or scan, whatever you can </li></ul><ul><li>Expose your collections  w...
Resources <ul><li>Shifting Gears :  Gearing Up to Get Into the Flow  </li></ul><ul><li>Ricky Erway and Jennifer Schaffner ...
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  • Fuller Disclosure: Getting More Collections into the Network Flow

    1. 1. Fuller Disclosure: Getting More Collections into the Network Flow Karen Smith-Yoshimura OCLC Programs and Research NELINET Conference Revealing Hidden Collections: Making the Lost Found Again Worcester, MA November 14, 2008
    2. 2. “ It is not the strongest of the species that survives, nor the most intelligent that survives. It is the one that is the most adaptable to change.” — Charles Darwin Image: Auckland Museum
    3. 3. Collections Grid A framework for representing content Published Content • Books • Journals • Newspapers • Gov. docs • CD, DVD • Maps • Scores <ul><li>Special Collections </li></ul><ul><li>• Rare books </li></ul><ul><li>• Local/Historical newspapers </li></ul><ul><li>• Local history materials </li></ul><ul><li>• Photographs </li></ul><ul><li>• Archives & Manuscripts </li></ul><ul><li>• Theses & Dissertations </li></ul><ul><li>Museum objects </li></ul>Source: OCLC Office of Research 2003 Institutional Content • ePrints/tech reports • Learning objects • Courseware • Local government reports • Training manuals • Research data Open Web Content • Freely-available web resources • Open source software • Newspaper archives • Images digital print HIGH LOW HIGH LOW stewardship uniqueness The Collective Collection
    4. 4. David Lewis (Dean of University Library, Indiana University Purdue) predicts in 20 years less than 50% of a library’s investments will go to purchasing collections Investment in locally curated content increases as library engagement in research support increases Investment in acquired content decreases as print collection is retired and shared purchasing of e-resources increases
    5. 5. Recent attention given to hidden collections <ul><li>Council on Library and Information Resources: Cataloging Hidden Special Collections and Archives </li></ul><ul><li>(Mellon funded $4.27 million) </li></ul><ul><li>http://www.clir.org/hiddencollections/index.html </li></ul><ul><li>National Historical Publications and Records Commission grants </li></ul><ul><li>“ activities to reveal collections that researchers cannot easily discover” </li></ul><ul><li>Association of Research Libraries Special Collections Task Force 2001-2006 </li></ul><ul><li>http://www.arl.org/rtl/speccoll/spcolltf/status0706.shtml </li></ul>
    6. 6. Funding for streamlined processes
    7. 7. http://www.loc.gov/bibliographic-future/news/lcwg-ontherecord-jan08-final.pdf
    8. 8. Enhance access to rare, unique, and other special hidden materials <ul><li>2.1.1 Make the discovery of rare, unique and other special hidden materials a high priority </li></ul><ul><li>2.1.2 Streamline cataloging for rare, unique and other special hidden materials, emphasizing greater coverage and broader access </li></ul><ul><li>2.1.3 Integrate access to rare, unique and other special hidden materials with other library materials </li></ul><ul><li>2.1.4 Encourage digitization to allow broader access </li></ul><ul><li>2.1.5 Share access to rare, unique and other special hidden materials </li></ul>
    9. 9. Image: from the end of “Raiders of the Lost Ark” Who knows what’s hidden in our collections?
    10. 10. What percentage of your collection do you estimate has not been adequately described – and is unlikely to be described without additional resources, funding, or both? RLG Programs Descriptive Metadata Practices Survey Results: Data Supplement http://www.oclc.org/programs/publications/reports/2007-04.pdf 18% 35% 24% 22%
    11. 11. Princeton University Archives Even processed materials need description
    12. 13. Yale University
    13. 14. Where do you begin an online search for information on a topic? College Students’ Perceptions of Libraries and Information Resources: a Report to the OCLC Membership : http://www.oclc.org/reports/perceptionscollege.htm
    14. 15. Be where the users go Image: informationarchitects.jp/web-trend-map-2008-beta/
    15. 16. Image: http://hello.eboy.com/eboy/wp-content/uploads/shop/EBY_FooBar_35t.png
    16. 17. Discovery happens elsewhere – Be there!
    17. 20. So how much metadata is really needed?
    18. 21. Diffusion
    19. 23. Relationships and controlled vocabularies contributed by all catalogers of all editions Concentration
    20. 26. Where the users are
    21. 29. Going mobile, part of diffusion
    22. 30. <ul><li>Concentration </li></ul><ul><li>Diffusion </li></ul><ul><li>Aggregation of data at the network level </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Descriptive </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Mining the clickstream: “Database of intentions” </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Social </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Network effects </li></ul><ul><li>Syndication to many destinations </li></ul><ul><ul><li>A feed based universe </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Data </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>APIs </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Widgets </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Mobilization in user workflows </li></ul><ul><li>Encourage social participation </li></ul>
    23. 31. Yale University Archives vault Digitize for access
    24. 32. Don’t get further behind Trinity College Dublin
    25. 33. University of Aberdeen Stop thinking about item-level description
    26. 35. Quantity over quality Images: labs.live.com/photosynth/
    27. 36. Images: Harry Ransom Center, UT Austin
    28. 37. Combine approaches
    29. 38. Do it all Images: A View to Hugh (blog)
    30. 39. Share your findings Images: A View to Hugh (blog) www.lib.unc.edu/blogs/morton/
    31. 40. Images: various
    32. 41. Preserve right to reuse/remix
    33. 42. Work with partners to get what you want
    34. 43. Describing collections <ul><li>How much detail is necessary – if discovery will happen elsewhere? </li></ul><ul><li>… only 27 MARC fields are in 10% or more of WorldCat records </li></ul><ul><li>Focus on collection-level descriptions </li></ul><ul><li>Start with basic description, then </li></ul><ul><ul><li>… allow serious researchers to contact you for more detail, and </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>… engage your user community to add to the descriptions </li></ul></ul><ul><li>More product, less process (Greene-Meissner) </li></ul>
    35. 44. The changing context for metadata management <ul><li>B.W. (Before the Web) </li></ul><ul><li>For finding and managing library materials (mostly print) </li></ul><ul><li>Catalog records (well-understood rules and encoding conventions) </li></ul><ul><li>Shared cooperative cataloging systems </li></ul><ul><li>Usually handcrafted, one at a time </li></ul><ul><li>A.W. (After the Web) </li></ul><ul><ul><li>For finding and managing many types of materials, for many user communities </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Many types of records, many sources </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Loosely coupled metadata management, reuse and exchange services among multiple repositories </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Multiple batch creation and metadata extract, conversion, mapping, ingest and transfer services </li></ul></ul>
    36. 45. Most common crosswalks between schemas used (from 2008 survey of RLG Partners) 63% of 100 respondents convert between MARC and non-MARC formats Metadata can be repurposed %
    37. 46. Fuller disclosure! Get discovered! <ul><li>Digitize or scan, whatever you can </li></ul><ul><li>Expose your collections where people congregate </li></ul><ul><li>Share your metadata </li></ul><ul><li>Quantity trumps quality </li></ul><ul><li>“ Include and postpone” – items can be organized and metadata enriched over time </li></ul>
    38. 47. Resources <ul><li>Shifting Gears : Gearing Up to Get Into the Flow </li></ul><ul><li>Ricky Erway and Jennifer Schaffner </li></ul><ul><li>http://www.oclc.org/programs/publications/reports/2007-02.pdf </li></ul><ul><li>Blogs http://hangingtogether.org/ </li></ul><ul><li> http://orweblog.oclc.org/ </li></ul><ul><li>Web www.oclc.org/programs </li></ul><ul><li>Karen Smith-Yoshimura [email_address] </li></ul><ul><li>Thanks to Karen Calhoun, Lorcan Dempsey, Ricky Erway, Thom Hickey, Roy Tennant, and other OCLC contributors. </li></ul>

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