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What is meaningful learning (mark baring)

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BTTE

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  • 1. What is meaningful learning? PREPARED BY: MARK PHILIP E. BARING BTTE-4
  • 2. the nature of the learning
    • drives learning
    • understanding of and effort
    • invested in completing a task or activity
    • completing standardized tests testing factories
  • 3. education meaningful task
    • pursue should engage active, constructive, intentional, authentic, and cooperative
    • new situation set goals and regulate the goals
    • technologies Active (Manipulative/Observant human process adapt to their environment
  • 4. Characteristics of Meaningful Learning.
    • Active
    • Constructive
    • Intentional
    • Authentic
    • Cooperative
  • 5. Characteristics of Meaningful Learning .
    • Manipulative/Observant
    • Goal directed/Regulatory
    • Complex/Contextualized
    • Collaborative/Conversational
    • Articulate /Reflective
  • 6. Learning From Technology ,
    • illustrations & projectors
    • later radio, motion pictures
    • programmed instruction
    • emerged educational technology
    • Computers
    • commercial technology information was recorded
  • 7. Learning From Technology,
    • films and television programs modem
    • computer technologies
    • microcomputers (Becker, 1985).graphics programs desktop publishing
    • flexible media technologies as learning tools
  • 8. Learning With Technology
    • cognitive learning strategies and critical thinking skills
    • engage learners in active, constructive, intentional, authentic, and cooperative learning
    • conveyors or communicators of meaning conceptually and intellectually engaging
    • meaningful personal interpretations and representations of the world
    • cognitive responsibility for performance
  • 9. How Technologies Foster Learning
    • • Technology as tools to support knowledge constructi(;m:
    • • for representing learners' ideas, understandings, and beliefs
    • • for producing organized, multimedia knowledge bases by learners
    • • Technology as information vehicle for exploring knowledge to support
    • learning by constructing:
    • D for accessing needed information
    • • for comparing perspectives, beliefs, and worldviews
    • 8 Chapter 1
    • • Technology as authentic context to support learning by doing:
    • • for representing and simulating meaningful real-world problems,
    • situations, and contexts
    • • for representing beliefs, perspectives, arguments, and stories of others
    • o for defining a safe, controllable problem space for student thinking
    • • Technology as social medium to support learning by conversing:
    • o for collaborating with others, ,
    • o for discussing, arguing, and, lamella consensus among members of a
    • community
    • o for supporting discourse among knowledge-building communities
    • • Technology as intellectual partner (Jonassen, 2000) to support learning by
    • reflecting:
    • o for helping learners to articulate and represent what they know
    • ,0 for reflecting on what they have learned and how they came to know it
    • o for supporting learners' internal negotiations and meaning making
    • o for constructing personal representations of meaning
    • o for supporting mindful thinking
  • 10. How Technologies Foster Thinking
    • Analogical
    • Expressive
    • Problem Solving
    • Experiential
    • Causal reasoning
  • 11. Conclusion
    • Knowledge construction, not reproduction
    • Conversation, not reception
    • Articulation, not repetition
    • Collaboration, not corn petition
    • Reflection, not prescription
  • 12. Things to think about
    • If you would like' to reflect on the ideas that ~e present din this chapter, consider
    • your responses to the following questions.
    • If learners cannot know what the teacher knows because they do not share
    • a common knowledge and experience base, how can we be certain that
    • students learn important things? For instance, if you want to teach
  • 13. your theory of learning
    • (construct personal meaning)
    • learners construct knowledge
    • back to your childhood
    • recent controversial topic
    • Radical constructivists argue
    • educators argue
    • thinking processes engaged
    • learn anything from that activity
    • video, movie, slide show, or computer program
  • 14. your theory of learning
    • Radical constructivists argue
    • educators argue
    • thinking processes engaged
    • learn anything from that activity
    • video, movie, slide show, or computer program
  • 15. References
    • Becker, H. J.. (1985). How schools use microcomputers:
    • Summaryofa 1983 national survey. (ERIC Document
    • Reproduction Service No. EO 257448)
    • Clark, R. (1983). Mere vehicles. Review of Educational
    • Research, 53(4), 445-459.
    • Hadley, M., & Sheingold, K. (1993).Comrnonalities
    • and distinctive patterns in teacher interaction of
    • computers. American Journal of Edilcation, 101(3),
    • 261-315.
    • Hume, D. (1739/2000). A treatise of human nature.
    • Oxford, UK: Oxford University Press.
    • Jonassen, D. H. (2000). Computers as mindtools in
    • schools: Engaging critical thinking . .Columbus,
    • OH: Merrill/Prentice Hall.
    • Chapter 1
    • Erlbaum.
    • Jonassen, D. H., & Ionas, 1. G. (2007). Designing effective
    • supports for causal reasoning. Educational
    • Technology: Research and Development, 55.
    • Polkinghorne, D. (1988). Narrative knowing and the
    • human sciences. Albany: State University of New
    • York Press.
    • Scardamalia, M. & Bereiter, C. (1994). Computer
    • support for knowledge building communities.
    • Journal of the Learning Sciences, 3(3), 265-283.
    • Schank, R. C. (1994). Goal-based scenarios. In R. C.
    • Schank & E. Langer (Eds.), Beliefs, reasoning,
    • and decision making: Psycho-logic in honor of Bob
    • Abelson (pp. 1-33). Hillsdale, NI: Lawrence