Spatialstorytelling

549 views
422 views

Published on

From Urban Street conference in Talinn

Published in: Design
0 Comments
2 Likes
Statistics
Notes
  • Be the first to comment

No Downloads
Views
Total views
549
On SlideShare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
4
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
13
Comments
0
Likes
2
Embeds 0
No embeds

No notes for slide

Spatialstorytelling

  1. 1. Spa$al storytelling in hybrid  ecosystems  Kai Pata  Tallinn University, Center for Educa$onal Technology 
  2. 2. What is a story?  •  If we say Story we usually think of the  common conceptualiza$on of sequen$al  narra$ves as representa$ons created by  authors.  •  What if we look at stories and narra$ve  prac$ces in spa$al terms? 
  3. 3. Hybrid ecosystem 
  4. 4. Hybrid ecosystem  •  Ecosystems are dynamic, emergent and  responsive.   •  Ecosystems allow diversity and heterogeneity  of members who interact.   •  In ecosystems autonomous self‐direc$ng  agents adapt themselves to the ecosystem  causing self‐organiza$on, and they co‐adapt as  a result of mutual interac$on. 
  5. 5. We narrate ourselves into the world   We no$ce different perspec$ves 
  6. 6. We are hybrid beings  •  We may well describe ourselves as hybrid beings  extending ourselves to the world through  narra$ve ac$ons in order to mediate our  interac$ons with the world.   •  Place is a temporary extension of ourselves in the  moment of our interac$on with the world.  •  Place is a self‐hybridiza$on with the World as  part of eco‐cogni$ve chance‐seeking.  
  7. 7. Accumulated chances  We store eco‐cogni$ve chances to the hybrid  ecosystem and use community chances for  naviga$on  
  8. 8. Spa$al storytelling  •  Spa$ally we can look at places as n‐ dimensional meaning‐, ac$on‐ and geospaces.   Embedding feelings to places 
  9. 9. “Narra$ve ecology” experiment  •  Within one month each par$cipant took  pictures in the city space, signifying places as  personal perspec$ves.  •  The final story was distributed across different  soPware loca$ons, geographical and meaning‐ places.   •  Each par$cipant became aware of these  emergent narra$ves through the friendfeed  connec$ons and mashed tag channels.   
  10. 10. Individual storytellers would act largely as autonomous  agents, aligning their narra$ves according to story  prototypes that they perceive 
  11. 11. Ontobrands as story prototypes  PERCEIVED STORIES  TAGSPACE OF STORIES  STORYLINE AS A  INVASION  TRAJECTORY   SUSTAINABLE  ECOLOGY  MESSAGE  ATTRACTOR BASINS OF STORIES 
  12. 12. Humans as ants in hybrid ecosystem –  narra$ve swarming   •  Space with dynamically embedded meanings  (eg. spoken narra$ves, movement) entails  ac$on poten$als.  •  The spa$al view to storytelling focuses on the  places in conceptual space that serve as  a^ractors for community’s s$gmergic ac$on. 
  13. 13. Individual search  Detect the signal  Dis$nguishing  Previous  disturbance  feature  experience  No$cing a story  Detec$ng a^ractor  Analogy   Selected no$cing  object  Feedback loop  Following the  from the  signal trail  environment  Visibility  Collec$ng and  Collabora$ng,  Wri$ng narra$ve,  leaving signal trail  cloning the  mashing, tagging,  story  geo‐tagging  Abduc$on  Increasing a^ractor  Modifying the signal  New  concentra$on  story  Expanding, transla$ng, interpre$ng 
  14. 14. Swarming phenomena in city space  Some swarming ac$ons took place around perceived stories as  a^ractor areas in space – many storytellers were autonomously  contribu$ng to the emerging shared stories.    
  15. 15. Poten$al of spa$al storytelling  •  The experimental  results indicated that  enac$on with the  geographical  dimensions of  narrated places was  less frequent than  could be expected.   Places are powerful triggers 
  16. 16. Places evoke personal stories  Day two  Day one  Day three 
  17. 17. Ac$on may follow in places 
  18. 18. Interac$ons with places  •  People rather interact with the emo$onal  dimensions of the places in hybrid ecosystem.  •  But emo$onal dimensions cannot be mapped  yet while we interact with geographical  loca$ons.  •  Interac$on in geographical loca$ons is rare  because the density of accumulated contents  is low. 

×