• Share
  • Email
  • Embed
  • Like
  • Save
  • Private Content
Self-direction indicators
 

Self-direction indicators

on

  • 892 views

 

Statistics

Views

Total Views
892
Views on SlideShare
889
Embed Views
3

Actions

Likes
0
Downloads
13
Comments
1

1 Embed 3

http://www.slideshare.net 3

Accessibility

Categories

Upload Details

Uploaded via as Adobe PDF

Usage Rights

© All Rights Reserved

Report content

Flagged as inappropriate Flag as inappropriate
Flag as inappropriate

Select your reason for flagging this presentation as inappropriate.

Cancel

11 of 1 previous next

  • Full Name Full Name Comment goes here.
    Are you sure you want to
    Your message goes here
    Processing…
  • In Kinshuk, D.G. Sampson, J.M. Spector, P. Isaias & D. Ifenthaler (Eds.), Proceedings of the IADIS CELDA 2009 Conference - Cognition and Exploratory Learning in Digital Age [CD-ROM]. October 20-22, 2009, Rome, Italy.
    Are you sure you want to
    Your message goes here
    Processing…
Post Comment
Edit your comment

    Self-direction indicators Self-direction indicators Presentation Transcript

    • Self‐Direc*on Indicators for Evalua*ng  the Design‐Based eLearning Course with  Social So<ware  Kai Pata, Sonja Merisalo  Tallinn University, Ins*tute of Informa*cs, Center for Educa*onal Technology,   Narva road 25, 10120, Tallinn, Estonia.  Email: kpata@tlu.ee; sonja.merisalo@gmail.com   CELDA 2009, ROME, November, 20‐22th 
    • New learning context  •  In the context of life‐long learning it makes sense  for learners to target the Instruc*onal Designs  towards their own needs.   •  Maintaining Personal Learning Environments  (PLE) can offer learners the opportunity to plan  their own learning trajectory and enter to  different collabora*ve learning ac*vi*es.  •  The design process enables the development of  self‐direc*on and self‐reflec*on habits as part of  the design process.   
    • PLE‐based course tools 
    • Outline of an eLearning course  COMPOSING PLE  SELF‐REFLECTIONS  INTEGRATING  55 students from  GROUP PLEs  10 interna*onal  Personal learning  universi*es  PLANNING THE  contract  reflected weekly  GROUPWORK  through a  reflec*on  template during  E‐LEARNING  the 14 weeks  COURSE  course.   PROTOTYPE  Personal learning  contract  GROUPWORK  INDIVIDUAL WORK 
    • Problem  •  It is important to find methods of evalua*ng  learning process with personal learning  environments using unobtrusive methods.  Goal  •  The development of self‐direc*on indicators  for evalua*ng the e‐learning course using  students‘ self reflec*ons in blogs.  
    • Weekly reflec*on templates   •  Ques*ons:  –  What was the most important thing you learned this  week?  –  What was par*cularly interes*ng/boring in this week?  –  Was there something you did not quite understand and  want to know more about it?  –  What kind of ques*ons/ideas/experiences this week's  ac*vi*es raised for you?  –  Which tools did you use this week? Explain what was the  purpose of using these tools (e.g. social talk, to regulate  my team ac*vi*es, to work on my documents)?  –  With whom did you communicate during this week, how  many *mes, with which tools, and for what purposes? 
    • Research ques*ons   •  Which are the indicators of the self‐direc*on  in students’ self‐reflec*on blogs‐posts?   •  What is their applica*on during the Design‐ based learning course?   •  Which are the interrela*ons between the  indicators of self‐direc*on?  
    • Three types of ‘tools’  •  For iden*fying self‐reflec*on indicators we can  elaborate ac*vity theory (Engeström, 1987) that  uses the ‚tool‘ concept (eg. material tools,  language, and the organiza;on of group‐work )  as central for signifying various mediators that  enable learners and teams to fulfill objec*ves.   •  Self‐direc;ng competence becomes a cogni;ve  tool, and may serve as another mediator of  ac*ons.  
    • Three types of compe*ng ‘tools’  •  Three types of compe*ng ‚tools‘ are available  for individuals who design and maintain their  Personal Learning Environments in learning  courses:   –  a) material tools (eg. social so<ware);   –  b) team as the tool to reach personal and group  goals during the ac*vity; and   –  c) the person itself with its aresenal of self‐ direc*on competences.  
    • Differences  Different  Clear  between me  voices of  Expect  Unclear  the group  the Self  others to  Organize  work  the team  Clarity of  Ruptured  the  situa*ons   Team  course  as the  tool  Formulate  needs  Find  resources  Set goals  Start new  Find  Con*nue  tools  Self‐direc*ng  strategies  using  strategies  tools  Diagnose  Create  Social  agenda  so<ware use  Evaluate  Implement  Difficul*es  Restart  with tools  The voice  new tools  Drop  of the  tools  writer  Observed  change   I  I as part  of the  In  In  Indicators  group  others  Self 
    • Strategies for self‐direc*on  Self‐direc*ng strategies are  not frequently reflected in  blog posts 
    • Tool usage in PLEs  Integra*ng PLEs for  group‐work causes  dropping some  Group work was a trigger to  personal tools and  persuade students to keep using  trying new tools  certain team tools and start using  again some ini*ally used tools.  
    • Clarity of the course  Un‐clarity of the course  increases when PLEs are  integrated and team tries to  find common teamwork habits 
    • The voice of the writer  Student gradually becomes  from individual learner  towards considering himself  as part of the group 
    • Compe*ng ‘tool’ systems  When students perceived that  ‘course was not clear’, they  started ‘organizing the team’   Students who par*cipated ac*vely in team  stopped self‐direc*on in reflec*ons  Indicators of self‐direc*on were  not mutually correlated  indica*ng to the serious  problems in using self‐direc*on  components systema*cally in  self‐reflec*on blog posts.  
    • Conclusions  •  Indicators of self‐direc*on can be systema*cally  collected from self‐reflec*ons and could be used  for evalua*ng the progress and constraints in e‐ learning courses that involve parallel individual  and group assignments with social so<ware.   •  However, there exists a tension and compe**on  between simultaneous individual and group  assignments, and reflec*ng evidences of self‐ direc*on in both ac*vi*es. 
    • This study was funded by:   iCamp project (027168) under the IST 6th framework programme of  the EU   hpp://www.icamp.eu/   Targeted research project of Estonian Ministry of Educa*on and  Research: "E‐learning systems with distributed   architecture, their interoperability and models of applica*on"   Estonian Science Founda*on project: "The framework for suppor*ng  and analysing self‐directed learning in augmented learning  environment"