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Surrealism overview
Surrealism overview
Surrealism overview
Surrealism overview
Surrealism overview
Surrealism overview
Surrealism overview
Surrealism overview
Surrealism overview
Surrealism overview
Surrealism overview
Surrealism overview
Surrealism overview
Surrealism overview
Surrealism overview
Surrealism overview
Surrealism overview
Surrealism overview
Surrealism overview
Surrealism overview
Surrealism overview
Surrealism overview
Surrealism overview
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Surrealism overview

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An introduction to a few surrealist artists and concepts.

An introduction to a few surrealist artists and concepts.

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  • painting the f -holes of a stringed instrument onto the photographic print and then rephotographing the print, Man Ray altered what was originally a classical nude.
  • Golconda, according to the Oxford English Dictionary, "a synonym for 'mine of wealth’.” The name comes from an ancient town in central India that had a huge diamond mine.
  • An accidental correspondence of two or more events that relate to one another.
  • Transcript

    • 1. Surrealism An art movement in the early 1900’s that wasobsessed with dreams, psychology, sex, and death. The surrealists also wanted to reveal the hiddendesires and fears of society…possibly to destroy it… or to fall in love with it. Or both.The Persistence of Memory by Salvador Dalí 1931
    • 2. Mastering what he called "the usual paralyzing tricks of eye-fooling," Dalí painted this work with "the most imperialist fury of precision…tosystematize confusion and thus to help discredit completely the world of reality."The Persistence of Memory Oil on canvas by Salvador Dalí 1931
    • 3. Juxtaposition To place objectsnear or overlapping each other for acontrasting or ironic effectLe violin de IngresGelatin silver printby Man Ray 1924
    • 4. Positive & Negative Space When an artist uses the empty space that surrounds an object to create a secondary shape or object. Dali Skull Photograph by Phillipe Halsman, 1951
    • 5. Repetition The reoccurrence of an event, thing, or action. Surrealists will use repetition to create drama or ridiculousness.GolcondaOil on canvasby Rene Magritte1953 Raices Oil on by Frida Kahlo
    • 6. Metamorphosis is when you show one objectMetamorphosis of the Narcissus by transforming into Salvador Dalí 1937 another.
    • 7. Narcissus,in his immobility,absorbed by his reflection with the digestive slowness ofcarnivorous plants,becomes invisible.There remains of him only the hallucinatingly white oval of his head,his head again more tender,his head, chrysalis of hidden biological designs,his head held up by the tips of the waters fingers,at the tips of the fingersof the insensate hand,of the terrible hand,of the mortal handof his own reflection.When that head slitswhen that head splitswhen that head bursts,it will be the flower,the new Narcissus,Gala - my Narcissus
    • 8. The Surrealists Approved of by André Breton“I believe in the future resolution ofthese two states, dream andreality, which are seemingly socontradictory, into a kind ofabsolute reality, a surreality, if onemay so speak.”
    • 9. Yves Tanguy Indefinite Divisibilityoil on canvas 1942
    • 10. Yves TanguySlowly Towards the North oil on canvas 1942
    • 11. Yves Tanguy •Spent time in Africa while serving in the French Army. •Obsessed with amorphic shapes. •Sometimes called “Lunar Landscapes,” but his work predates space travel.Shadow Country 1927
    • 12. VictorBraunerSelf PortraitOil on canvas1931
    • 13. Victor BraunerThe Head ofBenjaminFondane,Oil on canvas1931
    • 14. Victor BraunerComposition withPortraitOil on canvas1930
    • 15. Victor BraunerUntitledOil on canvasdate unknown
    • 16. Victor Brauner• Born in Romania• Obsessed with eyes.• Paints self portraits in the 1930’s, all with the same damaged eye.
    • 17. Victor BraunerAnd then in 1938….
    • 18. Victor Brauner"Each painting that I make is projected from thedeepest sources of my anxiety..." Photo from 1966
    • 19. Yves Tanguy Alan Cumming 
    • 20. Alan Cumming Salvador Dalí 
    • 21. Coincidence vs. Fate Notebook Essay Was it a coincidence that Victor Brauner “predicted” his own injury? Or was it his fate?Was Victor Brauner destined to lose an eye? Or is this an accidental occurrence? Write a short essay where you back up one of these claims with evidence from your own experience.
    • 22. René Magritte “It is a union that suggests the essential mystery of the world. Art for me is not an end in itself, but a means of evoking that mystery.” René Magritte on putting seemingly unrelated objects together in juxtapositionLe fils de lhomme1964Oil on canvas
    • 23. Rene Magritte The Treachery of Images 1928-29“An object never serves the Oil on canvassame function as its imageor its name”

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