Perception

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Perception

  1. 1. Perception &Perceptual Process Presented By, Anusha Ajith
  2. 2. “ WE DON’T SEE THINGSAS THEY ARE,WE SEE THINGS AS WEARE ”
  3. 3. Definition• According to Udai Pareek, “perception can be defined as the process of receiving, selecting, organizing, interpreting, checking and reacting to sensory stimuli or data”.• Stephen P. Robbins defines perception as “a process by
  4. 4. Perceptual Process ThroughInputs Outputs puts Selection OrganisationStimuli Action Interpretation
  5. 5. 1. Receiving Stimuli• The perception process starts with the reception of stimuli. The stimuli are received from the various sources.
  6. 6. Continued…• Through the five organs, we see things/objects, hear sounds, smell, taste and touch things. In this way, the reception of stimuli is a physiological aspect of perception process.
  7. 7. Continued…• Stimuli may be external to us (such as sound waves) and inside us (such as energy generation by muscles).
  8. 8. 2. Selection of Stimuli• People, in their everyday life, They cannot assimilate all what they observe or receive from the environment at a time.• Hence, they select some stimuli for further processing to attach meaning to them while the rest are screened out.
  9. 9. Continued…• Selection of stimuli is not made at random, but depending on the two types of factors, namely external factors and internal factors.• While external factors relate to stimuli such as intensity of stimuli, its size, movement, repitition, etc.
  10. 10. Continued…• internal ones relate to the perceiver such as his/her age, learning, interest, etc.• Normally people selectivity perceive objects or things which they are indifferent.• This is also called ‘selective perception’.
  11. 11. 3. Organisation of Stimuli• Having selected stimuli or data, these need to be organised in some form so as to assign some meaning to them.• Thus, organising the bits of information into a meaningful whole is called “organisation”.• There are three ways by which the selected data i.e., inputs are organized. These are:
  12. 12. a) Grouping• It is based on the similarity or proximity of various stimuli perceived.• The tendency to group stimuli. i.e., people or things appearing similar in certain ways has been a common means of organizing the perception.
  13. 13. b) Closure• When people face with incomplete information, they tend to fill the gap themselves to make it more meaningful.• They may do it on the basis of their experience, guess, or past data.
  14. 14. c) Simplification• When people find themselves overloaded with information, they try to simplify it to make it more meaningful and understandable.
  15. 15. 4. Interpretation• The data collected and organized remain meaningless for the perceiver till these are assigned meanings.• Assigning meanings to data is called ‘interpretation’
  16. 16. • Halo Effect“An effect whereby theperception of positivequalities in one thing or partgives rise to the perception ofsimilar qualities in relatedthings or in the whole.
  17. 17. • An example of the halo effect would be judging a good-looking person as more intelligent. The term is commonly used in human resources recruitment.• It refers to the risk that an interviewer will notice a positive trait in an interviewee and, as a result, will overlook their negative traits.
  18. 18. • Attribution• Explaining human behaviour in terms of cause and effect is called ‘Attribution’.• However, attributing casual explanation to a particular human behaviour sometimes tends to distort perception.
  19. 19. • Stereotyping• When individuals are judged on the basis of the characteristics of the group to which they belong, this is called ‘Stereotyping’.• e.g. ‘older workers cannot learn new skills’• ‘Japanese are nationalistic’
  20. 20. • Situation• The situation or context in which we observe or see things also influence our perception about them.
  21. 21. • Perceiver• The factors residing in the perceiver himself/her self do also operate to shape and sometimes distort his/her perception.• The perceiver attitude, motives, interests, past experience, and expectations are among the more relevant personal factors/characteristics that affect perception.
  22. 22. 5. Action• Action is the last phase in the perceptual process.• The action may be positive or negative depending upon favourable perception held by the perceiver.

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