DIFFERENTIATED INSTRUCTION MELANIE BURK PES 2010
WHAT IS DIFFERENTIATED  INSTRUCTION? <ul><li>Teachers enhance learning by matching student characteristics to instruction ...
WHAT IS DIFFERENTIATED INSTRUCTION <ul><li>Strengths of each learner in order to meet rigorous state standards. </li></ul>
DIFFERENTIATION <ul><li>Unique for every individual </li></ul><ul><li>Refers to the way students learn </li></ul><ul><li>I...
WHY DIFFERENTIATE? <ul><li>Lack of prerequisite skills. </li></ul><ul><li>Lack of mastery of previous grade level standard...
Outcomes for Teachers <ul><li>Understandings </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Differentiation is the key to supporting students with ...
Differentiating Instruction for Students with Disabilities in the Co-taught Classroom Essential Question: How do co-teache...
Reasons to Differentiate   Reason 1:  Student Interest Reason 2:  Student Learning Profile Reason 3:  Student Skill Level
<ul><li>Unique for every individual </li></ul><ul><li>Refers to the  way  students learn </li></ul><ul><li>Includes streng...
Reasons to Differentiate Reason 1:  Student Interest <ul><li>Students with disabilities have similar interests as other st...
Reasons to Differentiate Reason 1:  Student Interest <ul><li>Students with disabilities have similar interests as other st...
<ul><li>Unique for every individual </li></ul><ul><li>Refers to the  way  students learn </li></ul><ul><li>Includes streng...
<ul><li>Unique for every individual </li></ul><ul><li>Refers to the  way  students learn </li></ul><ul><li>Includes streng...
  Categories of a Learning Profile   <ul><li>Learning style </li></ul><ul><li>Multiple intelligences </li></ul><ul><li>Cul...
Reasons to Differentiate Reason 2:  Student Learning Profile <ul><li>Processing Systems in the Brain </li></ul><ul><li>Att...
Attention Reasons to Differentiate Reason 2:  Student Learning Profile The only factor becoming scarce in a world of abund...
OUTCOMES FOR TEACHERS <ul><li>UNDERSTANDINGS </li></ul><ul><li>Differentiation is the key to supporting students with lear...
OUTCOMES FOR TEACHERS <ul><li>ESSENTIAL QUESTION </li></ul><ul><li>How do teachers differentiate? </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Wh...
OUTCOMES FOR TEACHERS <ul><li>Skills </li></ul><ul><li>-Determine student’s interests, skill level </li></ul><ul><li>-Iden...
SKILL LEVEL (INSTRUCTIONAL LEVEL) <ul><li>Is the point at which a student can progress  beyond his/her independent level w...
DIFFERENTIATING Products and assessments <ul><li>Content </li></ul><ul><li>Process </li></ul><ul><li>Product </li></ul><ul...
PRODUCTS AND ASSESSMENTS <ul><li>Develop end of unit test prior to the beginning of the unit. Give it as a pretest to dete...
MATERIALS AND ACTIVITIES <ul><li>Consider the way activities and materials are being presented. How can they be adapted to...
MATERIALS AND ACTIVITIES <ul><li>All students do not have to meet GPS by using the same materials, engaging in the same ac...
STRATEGIES FOR DIFFERENTIATION <ul><li>Compacting the Curriculum </li></ul><ul><li>-assesses the student’s knowledge, skil...
STRATEGIES CTD. <ul><li>TIERED ASSIGNMENTS </li></ul><ul><li>Are a series of related tasks of varying complexity. All of t...
STRATEGIES CTD. <ul><li>ACCELERATION/DECELERATION </li></ul><ul><li>The pace that students move through the curriculum is ...
STRATEGIES CTD. <ul><li>Students experiencing difficulty, may need adjusted activities that allow for a slower pace in ord...
STRATEGIES CTD. <ul><li>Flexible grouping allows a student to be appropriately challenged and avoids labeling a student’s ...
STRATEGIES CTD. <ul><li>PEER TEACHING </li></ul><ul><li>A student may require one-on-one instruction that goes beyond the ...
STRATEGIES CTD. <ul><li>LEARNING STYLES </li></ul><ul><li>Consider learning styles. Does the student need to move, does th...
STRATEGIES CTD. <ul><li>STUDENT INTEREST </li></ul><ul><li>Use interest surveys. </li></ul><ul><li>Brainstorm subtopics wi...
STRATEGIES CTD. <ul><li>Read with a specific purpose and have an opportunity to discuss what was read.  </li></ul><ul><li>...
BUDDY STUDY <ul><li>Permits two or three students to work together on a project. All share the research/and analysis/organ...
STRATEGIES CTD. <ul><li>LEARNING CENTERS </li></ul><ul><li>May contain compulsory and differentiated activities. Learning ...
STRATEGIES CTD. <ul><li>Students are encouraged to manage their time efficiently. </li></ul><ul><li>The degree of structur...
STRATEGIES CTD. <ul><li>ANCHORING ACTIVITIES </li></ul><ul><li>Activities that students can do anytime when they have comp...
STRATEGIES CTD. <ul><li>Activities may relate to enrichment, or to address specific needs.  </li></ul><ul><li>These activi...
TO SUM IT ALL UP <ul><li>Differentiated instruction can lead to a more busy, and often less quiet than traditional teachin...
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Differentiated instruction workshop 2010

  1. 1. DIFFERENTIATED INSTRUCTION MELANIE BURK PES 2010
  2. 2. WHAT IS DIFFERENTIATED INSTRUCTION? <ul><li>Teachers enhance learning by matching student characteristics to instruction and assessment. </li></ul><ul><li>A philosophy of teaching that assumes all students learn in different ways. </li></ul><ul><li>Instruction is tailored to meet the unique needs and maximize the </li></ul>
  3. 3. WHAT IS DIFFERENTIATED INSTRUCTION <ul><li>Strengths of each learner in order to meet rigorous state standards. </li></ul>
  4. 4. DIFFERENTIATION <ul><li>Unique for every individual </li></ul><ul><li>Refers to the way students learn </li></ul><ul><li>Includes strength areas that promote learning and weak areas that make learning difficult </li></ul>
  5. 5. WHY DIFFERENTIATE? <ul><li>Lack of prerequisite skills. </li></ul><ul><li>Lack of mastery of previous grade level standards. </li></ul><ul><li>Need more practice or more time to learn. </li></ul><ul><li>Lower reading ability. </li></ul><ul><li>Cognitive ability. </li></ul>
  6. 6. Outcomes for Teachers <ul><li>Understandings </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Differentiation is the key to supporting students with learning differences </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Co-teaching utilizes differentiation to be effective and efficient </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Essential Question </li></ul><ul><ul><li>How do teachers differentiate classroom instruction for students with disabilities? </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Knowledge </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Identify the reasons to differentiate </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Identify the options for differentiation </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Skills </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Determine student interests, learning profile, and skill level </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Identify ways to differentiate content, products, assessments, materials, and activities </li></ul></ul>
  7. 7. Differentiating Instruction for Students with Disabilities in the Co-taught Classroom Essential Question: How do co-teachers differentiate classroom instruction for students with disabilities? The reasons to differentiate are used as the basis for determining accommodations and modifications Reasons to Differentiate Option 1: Content Option 2: Products and Assessments Option 3: Materials and Activities Options for Differentiation Reason 1: Student Interests Reason 2: Student Learning Profile Reason 3: Student Skill Level
  8. 8. Reasons to Differentiate Reason 1: Student Interest Reason 2: Student Learning Profile Reason 3: Student Skill Level
  9. 9. <ul><li>Unique for every individual </li></ul><ul><li>Refers to the way students learn </li></ul><ul><li>Includes strength areas that promote learning and weak areas that make learning difficult </li></ul>Reasons to Differentiate Reason 2: Student Learning Profile
  10. 10. Reasons to Differentiate Reason 1: Student Interest <ul><li>Students with disabilities have similar interests as other students in the co-taught class and some students with disabilities may have unique or alternative interests </li></ul><ul><li>Using student interests address motivation for learning issues </li></ul><ul><li>Ask students or parents to complete a student interest inventory to gain valuable information for differentiation </li></ul>
  11. 11. Reasons to Differentiate Reason 1: Student Interest <ul><li>Students with disabilities have similar interests as other students in the co-taught class and some students with disabilities may have unique or alternative interests </li></ul><ul><li>Using student interests address motivation for learning issues </li></ul><ul><li>Ask students or parents to complete a student interest inventory to gain valuable information for differentiation </li></ul>
  12. 12. <ul><li>Unique for every individual </li></ul><ul><li>Refers to the way students learn </li></ul><ul><li>Includes strength areas that promote learning and weak areas that make learning difficult </li></ul>Reasons to Differentiate Reason 2: Student Learning Profile
  13. 13. <ul><li>Unique for every individual </li></ul><ul><li>Refers to the way students learn </li></ul><ul><li>Includes strength areas that promote learning and weak areas that make learning difficult </li></ul>Reasons to Differentiate Reason 2: Student Learning Profile
  14. 14.   Categories of a Learning Profile <ul><li>Learning style </li></ul><ul><li>Multiple intelligences </li></ul><ul><li>Culture-influenced characteristics </li></ul><ul><li>Processing Systems </li></ul>Reasons to Differentiate Reason 2: Student Learning Profile
  15. 15. Reasons to Differentiate Reason 2: Student Learning Profile <ul><li>Processing Systems in the Brain </li></ul><ul><li>Attention </li></ul><ul><li>Memory </li></ul><ul><li>Visual-Spatial </li></ul><ul><li>Sequential </li></ul><ul><li>Language & Auditory </li></ul><ul><li>Motor Function </li></ul><ul><li>Higher-Order Thinking </li></ul>
  16. 16. Attention Reasons to Differentiate Reason 2: Student Learning Profile The only factor becoming scarce in a world of abundance
  17. 17. OUTCOMES FOR TEACHERS <ul><li>UNDERSTANDINGS </li></ul><ul><li>Differentiation is the key to supporting students with learning differences. </li></ul><ul><li>- Co-teaching utilizes differentiation to be effective and efficient. </li></ul>
  18. 18. OUTCOMES FOR TEACHERS <ul><li>ESSENTIAL QUESTION </li></ul><ul><li>How do teachers differentiate? </li></ul><ul><ul><li>What are some options to differentiate. </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Knowledge </li></ul>
  19. 19. OUTCOMES FOR TEACHERS <ul><li>Skills </li></ul><ul><li>-Determine student’s interests, skill level </li></ul><ul><li>-Identify ways to differentiate content, products, assessments, materials and activities. </li></ul>
  20. 20. SKILL LEVEL (INSTRUCTIONAL LEVEL) <ul><li>Is the point at which a student can progress beyond his/her independent level with appropriate support and instruction. May not always be grade level. </li></ul><ul><li>Refers to a student’s readiness for learning particular content or skills. </li></ul><ul><li>Is based on assessment. </li></ul>
  21. 21. DIFFERENTIATING Products and assessments <ul><li>Content </li></ul><ul><li>Process </li></ul><ul><li>Product </li></ul><ul><li>Base tests and quizzes on identified Understandings, Essential Questions, Knowledge and Skills. </li></ul>
  22. 22. PRODUCTS AND ASSESSMENTS <ul><li>Develop end of unit test prior to the beginning of the unit. Give it as a pretest to determine groupings for instruction throughout the unit. </li></ul><ul><li>Modify tests to accommodate the learning needs of students. </li></ul>
  23. 23. MATERIALS AND ACTIVITIES <ul><li>Consider the way activities and materials are being presented. How can they be adapted to differentiate instruction in the classroom? </li></ul><ul><li>Consider what you are asking students to do. How can that be adapted to differentiate instruction? </li></ul>
  24. 24. MATERIALS AND ACTIVITIES <ul><li>All students do not have to meet GPS by using the same materials, engaging in the same activities, or even receiving the same instruction. </li></ul>
  25. 25. STRATEGIES FOR DIFFERENTIATION <ul><li>Compacting the Curriculum </li></ul><ul><li>-assesses the student’s knowledge, skills and attitude and provides alternative activities for the student who has already mastered the curriculum content. This can be achieved by pre testing basic concepts, or using performance assessment methods. Students who demonstrate that they do not need instruction, move on to tiered problem solving, while others receive instruction. </li></ul>
  26. 26. STRATEGIES CTD. <ul><li>TIERED ASSIGNMENTS </li></ul><ul><li>Are a series of related tasks of varying complexity. All of these activities relate to essential understanding and key skills that student’s need to acquire. Teachers assign the activities as alternative ways of reaching the same goal, taking into account the student’s needs. </li></ul>
  27. 27. STRATEGIES CTD. <ul><li>ACCELERATION/DECELERATION </li></ul><ul><li>The pace that students move through the curriculum is another method of differentiating instruction. Students demonstrating a higher level of competence, can move through the curriculum at a faster pace. </li></ul>
  28. 28. STRATEGIES CTD. <ul><li>Students experiencing difficulty, may need adjusted activities that allow for a slower pace in order to experience success. </li></ul><ul><li>FLEXIBLE GROUPING </li></ul><ul><li>As a student’s performance varies, it is important to allow movement through various groups. Remember, a student may be below grade level in one subject, but on, or below grade level in another. </li></ul>
  29. 29. STRATEGIES CTD. <ul><li>Flexible grouping allows a student to be appropriately challenged and avoids labeling a student’s progress as static. </li></ul><ul><li>Students should not be kept in a static group for an extended period of time. </li></ul>
  30. 30. STRATEGIES CTD. <ul><li>PEER TEACHING </li></ul><ul><li>A student may require one-on-one instruction that goes beyond the needs of his peers. He can get valuable practice by teaching, poor re teaching the concept to peers. In these circumstances, both students benefit. </li></ul>
  31. 31. STRATEGIES CTD. <ul><li>LEARNING STYLES </li></ul><ul><li>Consider learning styles. Does the student need to move, does the room need to be totally quiet, is the student a visual or auditory learner? Since student motivation is unique to each student, try and get to know your students as well as possible. </li></ul>
  32. 32. STRATEGIES CTD. <ul><li>STUDENT INTEREST </li></ul><ul><li>Use interest surveys. </li></ul><ul><li>Brainstorm subtopics within a curriculum. </li></ul><ul><li>READING BUDDIES </li></ul><ul><li>Children will often be more willing to read away from the teacher as they develop fluency and comprehension. </li></ul>
  33. 33. STRATEGIES CTD. <ul><li>Read with a specific purpose and have an opportunity to discuss what was read. </li></ul><ul><li>Buddies do not have to be at the same reading level. </li></ul><ul><li>Adjusted follow up tasks are assigned based on readiness skills. </li></ul>
  34. 34. BUDDY STUDY <ul><li>Permits two or three students to work together on a project. All share the research/and analysis/organization of information but each student must complete an individual product to demonstrate learning that has taken place and be accountable for their own planning, time management and individual accomplishment. </li></ul>
  35. 35. STRATEGIES CTD. <ul><li>LEARNING CENTERS </li></ul><ul><li>May contain compulsory and differentiated activities. Learning center is not necessarily differentiated, unless taking into account different student ability and readiness. It is important that students know what is expected of them. </li></ul>
  36. 36. STRATEGIES CTD. <ul><li>Students are encouraged to manage their time efficiently. </li></ul><ul><li>The degree of structure that is provided, will vary according to the student's independent work habits. </li></ul><ul><li>Students should be able to account for their time. </li></ul>
  37. 37. STRATEGIES CTD. <ul><li>ANCHORING ACTIVITIES </li></ul><ul><li>Activities that students can do anytime when they have completed present assignments or can be assigned for a short period at the beginning or the end of class as students organize themselves and prepare for class. </li></ul>
  38. 38. STRATEGIES CTD. <ul><li>Activities may relate to enrichment, or to address specific needs. </li></ul><ul><li>These activities provide teachers the opportunity to work with smaller groups to provide more intense instruction to other students. </li></ul><ul><li>Should not be busy work, worthy of time and effort and appropriate to learning needs. </li></ul>
  39. 39. TO SUM IT ALL UP <ul><li>Differentiated instruction can lead to a more busy, and often less quiet than traditional teaching methods. </li></ul><ul><li>However, differentiation engages students more fully in their learning , provides for constant growth and development and provides for a stimulating and exciting classroom. </li></ul>
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