Chapter 02 ffi

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Chapter 02 ffi

  1. 1. Essentials of Fire Fighting 6th Edition Firefighter I Chapter 2 — Firefighter Safety and Health
  2. 2. List the main types of job-related firefighter fatalities, injuries, and illnesses. Learning Objective 1 2–2
  3. 3. Firefighter fatalities are caused by a variety of situations. 2–3
  4. 4. Firefighter injuries occur both on the fireground and at nonfire emergencies. 2–4
  5. 5. Firefighter injuries cause costs to both individuals and departments. 2–5
  6. 6. The shared costs of injuries can be prevented by both the individual and organization. 2–6
  7. 7. You must be aware of and protect yourself from certain chronic illnesses. 2–7 (Cont.)
  8. 8. You must be aware of and protect yourself from certain chronic illnesses. 2–8
  9. 9. REVIEW QUESTION What types of job-related injuries and illnesses can a firefighter expect to encounter? 2–9
  10. 10. Learning Objective 2 Describe the National Fire Protection Association® standards related to firefighter safety and health. 2–10
  11. 11. Fire service safety is governed by several standards, regulations, and initiatives. 2–11
  12. 12. NFPA® standards establish and regulate many aspects of safety. 2–12
  13. 13. NFPA® 1500 is the most comprehensive standard relating to safety and health. 2–13 (Cont.) Safety and health-related policies
  14. 14. NFPA® 1500 is the most comprehensive standard relating to safety and health. 2–14 (Cont.)
  15. 15. NFPA® 1500 is the most comprehensive standard relating to safety and health. 2–15
  16. 16. REVIEW QUESTION What topics does NFPA® 1500 cover regarding firefighter safety and health? 2–16
  17. 17. Identify Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) regulations that relate to firefighters. Learning Objective 3 2–17
  18. 18. OSHA regulations apply to specific categories of employees. 2–18
  19. 19. Other organizations work to reduce fire fatalities and focus on safety. 2–19 Annual Safety Stand-down
  20. 20. REVIEW QUESTION Federal OSHA regulations apply to what specific groups of firefighters? 2–20
  21. 21. Learning Objective 4 Summarize the model that supports the concept of risk management. 2–21
  22. 22. Risk management establishes criteria to assess benefit and risk at incidents. 2–22
  23. 23. REVIEW QUESTION How do the key behaviors of driving defensively, keeping the crew intact, and following standard fireground procedures support the concept of risk management? 2–23
  24. 24. Learning Objective 5 Describe fire department safety and health programs. 2–24
  25. 25. Learning Objective 6 Summarize firefighter health awareness issues. 2–25
  26. 26. Department safety and health programs target specific goals. 2–26
  27. 27. Safety and health programs are based on several specific components. 2–27
  28. 28. Health considerations for firefighters begin with adopting a healthy lifestyle. 2–28
  29. 29. REVIEW QUESTION What are the main goals of a safety and health program? 2–29
  30. 30. Employee assistance and wellness programs offer help in various ways. 2–30
  31. 31. REVIEW QUESTION What areas can an Employee Assistance and Wellness program assist with? 2–31
  32. 32. Learning Objective 7 Summarize safe vehicle operations. 2–32
  33. 33. Apparatus and vehicle safety begins with awareness and responsibility. 2–33
  34. 34. REVIEW QUESTION What key defensive driving skills can help promote safe vehicle operations? 2–34
  35. 35. Safe vehicle operation requires situational awareness. 2–35
  36. 36. You should know the rules that govern the vehicles you respond in. 2–36 CourtesyofMikeMalloryandTulsa(OK)FD
  37. 37. You must remember and use safety rules during emergency responses. 2–37
  38. 38. Braking and stopping an apparatus requires practice and safety. 2–38 Click for next slide
  39. 39. Nonemergency operations require you to follow safety guidelines also. 2–39 CourtesyofPatMcAuliffe
  40. 40. Learning Objective 8 Summarize guidelines for riding safely on the apparatus. 2–40
  41. 41. You must follow specific guidelines for safety on the apparatus. 2–41
  42. 42. REVIEW QUESTION What are the guidelines for safely riding on, mounting, and dismounting an apparatus? 2–42
  43. 43. Learning Objective 9 Describe ways to help prevent accidents and injuries in fire stations and facilities. 2–43
  44. 44. Unsafe conditions at fire facilities endanger both firefighters and visitors. 2–44
  45. 45. Injuries can be prevented by using a variety of safety measures. 2–45
  46. 46. REVIEW QUESTION How can firefighters prevent most back and leg strains related to injuries at fire stations and facilities? 2–46
  47. 47. Learning Objective 10 Explain general guidelines for tool and equipment safety. 2–47
  48. 48. You should always follow safety procedures when using tools. 2–48
  49. 49. Both unpowered and power tools require you to follow safety rules. 2–49 (Cont.)
  50. 50. Both unpowered and power tools require you to follow safety rules. 2–50
  51. 51. Follow safety rules to prevent accidents when using power saws. 2–51
  52. 52. REVIEW QUESTION What are two general guidelines to follow that can improve tool and equipment safety? 2–52
  53. 53. Learning Objective 11 Describe ways to maintain safety in training. 2–53
  54. 54. Personnel safety is one aspect of maintaining safe training practices. 2–54
  55. 55. Live fire training requires safety guidelines established in NFPA® 1403. 2–55
  56. 56. Maintaining and servicing equipment is an important part of training safety. 2–56
  57. 57. REVIEW QUESTION What three steps can you take to maintain personnel safety during training? 2–57
  58. 58. Learning Objective 12 State the practices a Firefighter I uses for emergency scene preparedness and safety. 2–58
  59. 59. The NIMS-ICS system provides a framework for jurisdictional cooperation. 2–59
  60. 60. Preparedness is also an important aspect of firefighter safety. 2–60
  61. 61. Emergency scene safety requires following some fundamental rules. 2–61
  62. 62. REVIEW QUESTION What fundamental rules can help minimize risks at an emergency scene? 2–62
  63. 63. Safety at roadway incidents hinges on personnel and apparatus visibility. 2–63
  64. 64. Personnel should work in a protected work area at roadway incidents. •1–64
  65. 65. REVIEW QUESTION What protective equipment is available to increase your safety at emergency scenes? 2–65
  66. 66. Learning Objective 13 Summarize general guidelines for scene management including highway incidents, crowd control, and cordoning off emergency scenes. 2–66
  67. 67. Scene management uses control zones to protect responders and others on- scene. 2–67
  68. 68. A collapse zone may also need to be created for the safety of those on-scene. 2–68
  69. 69. REVIEW QUESTION What types of control zones may be used to establish scene security? 2–69
  70. 70. Learning Objective 14 Explain the importance of personnel accountability. 2–70
  71. 71. Personnel accountability systems help save lives and prevent injuries. 2–71
  72. 72. REVIEW QUESTION Why is proper use of your personnel accountability system so important? 2–72
  73. 73. Respond to an incident, correctly mounting and dismounting an apparatus. This objective is measured in Skill Sheet 2-I-1. Learning Objective 15 2–73
  74. 74. Wearing appropriate PPE, including reflective vest, demonstrate scene management at roadway incidents using traffic and scene control devices. This objective is measured in Skill Sheet 2-I-2. Learning Objective 16 2–74
  75. 75. Summary • Safety is essential to your mission of protecting the public. • Protect yourself by relying on situational awareness, wearing required PPE, following orders, and following departmental safety policies and procedures. 2–75 (Cont.)
  76. 76. Summary • Take responsibility for your own safety – you cannot protect the community unless you first protect yourself. 2–76

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