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Integrating Motivational Aspects into the Design of Learning Support in Organization

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Presentation at I-KNOW 2009, Graz, September 2009

Presentation at I-KNOW 2009, Graz, September 2009

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Integrating Motivational Aspects into the Design of Learning Support in Organization Integrating Motivational Aspects into the Design of Learning Support in Organization Presentation Transcript

  • Integrating Motivational Aspects into the Design of Learning Support in Organizations Christine Kunzmann Andreas Schmidt Volker Braun David Czech Benjamin Fletschinger Silke Kohler Verena Lüber FZI Research Center for Information Technologies Pforzheim University of Applied Sciences, Germany contact@christine-kunzmann.de | aschmidt@fzi.de http://mature-ip.eu
  • Outline
    • Introduction: why is the consideration of motivation important?
    • Ethnographically informed study
    • Model of motivational aspects
    • Methodology for motivational design
    • Conclusions & Outlook
    MATURE - Continuous Social Learning in Knowledge Networks
  • Introduction
    • Employee motivation at the workplace is a very important aspect
    • This particularly applies to learning, collaboration, and knowledge sharing
    • But little has been done to address it
      • In KM a lot of focus has been given to monetary incentives
      • with very mixed success, e.g. short-lived, side-effects, can be off-putting for creative and genuine knowledge workers
    MATURE - Continuous Social Learning in Knowledge Networks
  • Why is motivation so difficult to address?
    • There are plenty of models for human motivation in different fields
    • They help to describe a given situation , but they are of little use for deciding what to do in a (socio-technical) learning support systems.
      • Frequently only focussed on the individual (psychology)
      • Or too narrow in their understanding of human needs
    • Problem: motivation is a generic phenomenon, but can only be addressed in a context-specific way .
    MATURE - Continuous Social Learning in Knowledge Networks
  • Our goals
    • Our (wider) context : support „knowledge maturing“
      • Collective learning in professional contexts
      • Mostly informal learning
    • How can we provide a helpful framework for designing a learning support system that takes care of motivational aspects?
    MATURE - Continuous Social Learning in Knowledge Networks
  • Our approach
    • Ethnographically informed study
      • Long-lasting ethnographic studies not possible
      • Rather „rapid ethnography“: Immersing into the working environment with ideally a previously established relationship
    • Primary study at a training department in a hospital
      • Comparison with other studies in IT and other service companies as part of the MATURE project
      • => We derived a motivational model from it
    • Student project team working together with two big companies for validating the model
    MATURE - Continuous Social Learning in Knowledge Networks
  • Ethnographically informed study (1)
    • Results of the study
      • Some positive indicators for motivators
      • But vast majority covered barriers
    • positive indicators:
      • curiosity and personal interest
      • membership in a community
      • personal standards
      • status and power
    MATURE - Continuous Social Learning in Knowledge Networks
  • Ethnographically informed study (2)
    • on the negative side (barriers ):
      • usability (of software systems)
      • regulations (by the organization)
      • workload and lack of resources
      • geographical barriers
      • lack of help
      • lack of money
      • personal attitude
      • competition
      • team culture
    MATURE - Continuous Social Learning in Knowledge Networks
  • Model for Motivational aspects MATURE - Continuous Social Learning in Knowledge Networks
  • Intervention: Individual Context Individual Context Interests allow for pursuit of individual interests and account for individual needs (e.g., curiosity) experiencing competence experiencing autonomy personal sense of perfectionism Capability human resource development, e.g., training, job enrichment, mentoring etc.
  • Intervention: interpersonal MATURE - Continuous Social Learning in Knowledge Networks Interpersonal Context Cooperative improving the economies of cooperation create and exploit social dynamics establish team culture overcome geographical distance awarenesss Affective team building promoting communication and empathy limit competition
  • Intervention: Work context MATURE - Continuous Social Learning in Knowledge Networks Work Context Enablers appropriateness of tool support ensuring usability ensuring smooth transitions between different systems ensuring reliability Organizational changing organizational structure (e.g., more permissive) changing regulations appreciation, valuing of creativity, new ideas incentive systems
  • Methodology for incorporating motivation into the design of learning support
    • Immersion of technical developers in the workplace reality
      • as part of ethnographically informed studies
      • guided by the model as presented
      • for creating a rich understanding of the context
    • Derivation of personas
      • a precise description of a user’s characteristics
      • what he/she wants to accomplish with an explicit consideration of the three aspects of the model
    MATURE - Continuous Social Learning in Knowledge Networks
  • Methodology (2)
    • Development of use case descriptions for those personas
      • direct interaction of developers and users (or their representatives)
      • with an explicit section on interventions targeted to motivational aspects or context conditions
    • 4. Deriving functional and non-functional requirements from those descriptions
    • 5. Formative evaluation of early prototypes
      • with end users
      • if possible: different motivational measures are compared to each other in order select the most effective one.
    MATURE - Continuous Social Learning in Knowledge Networks
  • Summary & Outlook
    • Motivational design of informal learning support is an important step for ensuring sustainability and user acceptance of solutions.
    • Contributions:
      • Systematization of motivational aspects based on ethnographically informed studies, further validated with two interviews in big enterprises
      • Methodology for integrating motivational aspects into the requirements engineering process
    • Further research will investigate the effectiveness of concrete design measures in experiments that are targeted at improving certain motivational aspects
    MATURE - Continuous Social Learning in Knowledge Networks
  • Contact
    • MATURE IP
    • http://mature-ip.eu
    Christine Kunzmann Researcher @ FZI and Kompetenzorientierte Personalentwicklung Ankerstr. 47, 75203 Königsbach-Stein, GERMANY, http://kompetenzen-gestalten.de [email_address] Andreas Schmidt Department Manager / Scientific Coordinator MATURE FZI Research Center for Information Technologies, Haid-und-Neu-Str. 10-14 Karlsruhe, GERMANY (http://fzi.de/ipe) andreas.schmidt@fzi.de, http://andreas.schmidt.name Open for associate partners!
  • Example persona
    • ” Silke has high personal standards and aims at continuously learning to improve her work practice. To that end, she regularly reflects about how tasks were carried out and what could have been done better or worse. .. . Her sense of perfection also applies to her everyday task management. She plans her tasks and appointment each day meticulously, and prepares each meeting with elaborate notes. … Clear structures within the applications are crucial as she lacks deep knowledge about computers.”
    MATURE - Continuous Social Learning in Knowledge Networks