Your SlideShare is downloading. ×
0
Leading  Teams 2009
Leading  Teams 2009
Leading  Teams 2009
Leading  Teams 2009
Leading  Teams 2009
Leading  Teams 2009
Leading  Teams 2009
Leading  Teams 2009
Leading  Teams 2009
Leading  Teams 2009
Leading  Teams 2009
Leading  Teams 2009
Leading  Teams 2009
Leading  Teams 2009
Leading  Teams 2009
Leading  Teams 2009
Leading  Teams 2009
Leading  Teams 2009
Leading  Teams 2009
Leading  Teams 2009
Leading  Teams 2009
Leading  Teams 2009
Leading  Teams 2009
Leading  Teams 2009
Leading  Teams 2009
Leading  Teams 2009
Leading  Teams 2009
Leading  Teams 2009
Leading  Teams 2009
Leading  Teams 2009
Leading  Teams 2009
Leading  Teams 2009
Leading  Teams 2009
Leading  Teams 2009
Leading  Teams 2009
Leading  Teams 2009
Leading  Teams 2009
Leading  Teams 2009
Leading  Teams 2009
Leading  Teams 2009
Leading  Teams 2009
Leading  Teams 2009
Leading  Teams 2009
Leading  Teams 2009
Leading  Teams 2009
Leading  Teams 2009
Leading  Teams 2009
Leading  Teams 2009
Leading  Teams 2009
Leading  Teams 2009
Leading  Teams 2009
Leading  Teams 2009
Leading  Teams 2009
Leading  Teams 2009
Leading  Teams 2009
Leading  Teams 2009
Leading  Teams 2009
Leading  Teams 2009
Leading  Teams 2009
Leading  Teams 2009
Leading  Teams 2009
Leading  Teams 2009
Leading  Teams 2009
Leading  Teams 2009
Leading  Teams 2009
Leading  Teams 2009
Leading  Teams 2009
Leading  Teams 2009
Leading  Teams 2009
Leading  Teams 2009
Leading  Teams 2009
Leading  Teams 2009
Leading  Teams 2009
Leading  Teams 2009
Leading  Teams 2009
Leading  Teams 2009
Leading  Teams 2009
Leading  Teams 2009
Leading  Teams 2009
Leading  Teams 2009
Leading  Teams 2009
Leading  Teams 2009
Leading  Teams 2009
Leading  Teams 2009
Leading  Teams 2009
Leading  Teams 2009
Leading  Teams 2009
Leading  Teams 2009
Leading  Teams 2009
Leading  Teams 2009
Leading  Teams 2009
Leading  Teams 2009
Leading  Teams 2009
Leading  Teams 2009
Leading  Teams 2009
Leading  Teams 2009
Leading  Teams 2009
Leading  Teams 2009
Leading  Teams 2009
Leading  Teams 2009
Leading  Teams 2009
Leading  Teams 2009
Leading  Teams 2009
Leading  Teams 2009
Leading  Teams 2009
Leading  Teams 2009
Leading  Teams 2009
Leading  Teams 2009
Leading  Teams 2009
Leading  Teams 2009
Leading  Teams 2009
Leading  Teams 2009
Leading  Teams 2009
Leading  Teams 2009
Leading  Teams 2009
Leading  Teams 2009
Leading  Teams 2009
Leading  Teams 2009
Leading  Teams 2009
Leading  Teams 2009
Leading  Teams 2009
Leading  Teams 2009
Leading  Teams 2009
Leading  Teams 2009
Leading  Teams 2009
Leading  Teams 2009
Leading  Teams 2009
Leading  Teams 2009
Leading  Teams 2009
Leading  Teams 2009
Leading  Teams 2009
Leading  Teams 2009
Leading  Teams 2009
Leading  Teams 2009
Leading  Teams 2009
Leading  Teams 2009
Leading  Teams 2009
Leading  Teams 2009
Leading  Teams 2009
Leading  Teams 2009
Leading  Teams 2009
Leading  Teams 2009
Leading  Teams 2009
Leading  Teams 2009
Leading  Teams 2009
Leading  Teams 2009
Leading  Teams 2009
Leading  Teams 2009
Leading  Teams 2009
Leading  Teams 2009
Leading  Teams 2009
Leading  Teams 2009
Leading  Teams 2009
Leading  Teams 2009
Leading  Teams 2009
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in...5
×

Thanks for flagging this SlideShare!

Oops! An error has occurred.

×
Saving this for later? Get the SlideShare app to save on your phone or tablet. Read anywhere, anytime – even offline.
Text the download link to your phone
Standard text messaging rates apply

Leading Teams 2009

1,405

Published on

Portfolio of Leading edge initiatives

Portfolio of Leading edge initiatives

0 Comments
2 Likes
Statistics
Notes
  • Be the first to comment

No Downloads
Views
Total Views
1,405
On Slideshare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
1
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
116
Comments
0
Likes
2
Embeds 0
No embeds

Report content
Flagged as inappropriate Flag as inappropriate
Flag as inappropriate

Select your reason for flagging this presentation as inappropriate.

Cancel
No notes for slide
  • WE RENAMED THE STYLES FOR EASE OF USE. CALLING SOMEONE AN RS IS BETTER THAN REFERRING TO THEM AS “UNPATTERNED ACTION.” THE MEASUREMENTS OF INPUT AND OUTPUT CAN BE COMBINED INTO A SINGLE SCALE. THIS COMBINATION IS CALLED A STRATEGIC STYLE. IT IS CALLED A STRATEGIC STYLE BECAUSE IT DESCRIBES YOUR “STRATEGY” FOR NAVIGATING LIFE. THE STYLES CAN BE COMBINED INTO A SINGLE GRAPHIC THAT SHOWS YOUR INODEVNATION TOWARD ALL FOUR STRATEGIC STYLES AT THE SAME TIME. EVERYONE HAS AT LEAST SOME CAPACITY IN EVERY STYLE. THIS IS BECAUSE EVERY STYLE IS NEEDED TO CONDUCT LIFE. HOWEVER, THE AMOUNT OF EMPHASIS WE GIVE EACH STYLE DIFFERS.
  • WE RENAMED THE STYLES FOR EASE OF USE. CALLING SOMEONE AN RS IS BETTER THAN REFERRING TO THEM AS “UNPATTERNED ACTION.” THE MEASUREMENTS OF INPUT AND OUTPUT CAN BE COMBINED INTO A SINGLE SCALE. THIS COMBINATION IS CALLED A STRATEGIC STYLE. IT IS CALLED A STRATEGIC STYLE BECAUSE IT DESCRIBES YOUR “STRATEGY” FOR NAVIGATING LIFE. THE STYLES CAN BE COMBINED INTO A SINGLE GRAPHIC THAT SHOWS YOUR INODEVNATION TOWARD ALL FOUR STRATEGIC STYLES AT THE SAME TIME. EVERYONE HAS AT LEAST SOME CAPACITY IN EVERY STYLE. THIS IS BECAUSE EVERY STYLE IS NEEDED TO CONDUCT LIFE. HOWEVER, THE AMOUNT OF EMPHASIS WE GIVE EACH STYLE DIFFERS.
  • Transcript

    • 1. Leading Teams <ul><li>People Acting Authentically and Adaptively </li></ul>
    • 2. Leading Teams Agenda <ul><li>Is about applying immunity to change </li></ul><ul><li>Is about leveraging your leadership map using the seven zones for leadership </li></ul><ul><li>Is about being in the fundamental state of leadership </li></ul><ul><li>Is about creating emotional intelligent teams </li></ul><ul><li>Is about enabling your personal assessment data and previous learning from workout sessions </li></ul><ul><li>Is about developing an “Adhocracy” Mindset </li></ul><ul><li>Is about applying Applied Behavioral Analysis </li></ul>
    • 3. Leading Teams Is about Overcoming <ul><li>Immunity to change </li></ul>* Developed by Dr. Robert Kegan and Lisa Laskow Lahey
    • 4. Continuation on Background ITC
    • 5. Overcoming Immunity: Three Premises <ul><li>Overcoming immunity does not require the elimination of all anxiety-management systems </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Ingredient #1: the Gut – a vital source of motivation for change </li></ul></ul><ul><li>It is not change that causes anxiety; it is the feeling that we are without defenses in the presence of what we see as danger that causes anxiety </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Ingredient # 2: Head and Heart – the work must simultaneously engage thinking and feeling </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Our immune systems can be overcome </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Ingredient # 3: Hand – the work is simultaneously about mindset and behavior </li></ul></ul>
    • 6. Adaptive Formulation <ul><li>Thinking Level (change prevention system) </li></ul><ul><ul><li>How you systematically generate the very behaviors that prevent progress towards goal </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Feeling Level (anxiety-management system) </li></ul><ul><ul><li>How generating these behaviors helps to ward off some of your worst fears, which are associated with your actually making progress you hope for </li></ul></ul>
    • 7. Adaptive Solution <ul><li>Knowing Level - The Heart of the ITC process </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Designing running and interpreting tests of the big assumptions </li></ul></ul>
    • 8. 3 Dimensions of Immunity <ul><li>First Dimension ( Thinking System ) - ITC map gives us a picture of how we are actively preventing the very change we wish to make </li></ul><ul><ul><li>But it also shows us how a given place in the continuum of mental development is at once a way of knowing the world and of managing a fundamental anxiety </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Second Dimension ( Feeling System ) – Reveals in the way persistent anxiety is managed </li></ul><ul><li>Third Dimension ( Knowing System ) – the epistemological balance that must be preserved if we are to maintain our way of knowing the world and ourselves </li></ul>
    • 9. Using ITC Requires <ul><li>Taking a Developmental Stance </li></ul><ul><li>We can all keep growing </li></ul><ul><li>We will need to, in order to accomplish our goals (as an organization, department, or team) </li></ul><ul><li>We will want to, in order to experience the greatest vitality and satisfaction in our work </li></ul><ul><li>Features of a Genuinely Developmental Stance </li></ul><ul><li>It recognizes that there is life after adolescence; that adulthood, too must be a time for ongoing growth and development </li></ul><ul><li>It honors the distinction between technical and adaptive learning agendas </li></ul><ul><li>It recognizes and cultivates the individual's intrinsic motivation to grow </li></ul><ul><li>It assumes that a change in mindset takes time and is not evenly paced </li></ul><ul><li>It recognizes that mindsets shape thinking and feeling, so changing mindsets needs to involve the head and the heart. </li></ul><ul><li>It recognizes that neither change in mindset nor change in behavior alone leads to transformation, but that each must be employed to bring about the other. </li></ul><ul><li>It provides safety for people to take the kinds of risks inherent in changing their minds. </li></ul>
    • 10. Types of Learning Challenges <ul><li>Technical Challenge (TC) </li></ul><ul><li>Technical challenges are not necessarily easy, nor are their results necessarily unimportant or insignificant. </li></ul><ul><li>Is where the skill set necessary to perform complicated behaviors is well known </li></ul><ul><li>Is when the routines and processes by which help make a novice and accomplished practitioner are well practiced and proven </li></ul><ul><li>Adaptive Challenge (AC) </li></ul><ul><li>Complexity is really a story about the relationship between the complex demands and arrangements of the world and our own complexity of mind </li></ul><ul><ul><li>When we look at this relationship we discover a gap: our own mental complexity lags behind the complexity of the world demands </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Can only be met by: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Transforming one’s mindset </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Advancing to a more sophisticated stage of mental development </li></ul></ul>Biggest error is when one applies technical means to solve adaptive challenges
    • 11. The Immunity to Change X-ray
    • 12. Is about applying Immunity to Change The X-ray The Solution <ul><li>If I don’t find a way to get things done, I’ll stop being valuable. </li></ul><ul><li>Our individual judgments are superior to any collective judgment. </li></ul><ul><li>To have things done my way </li></ul><ul><li>We are committed to preserving the pleasure of harshly criticizing and judging each other </li></ul><ul><li>Giving curt responses to new ideas, “closing off”, cutting off” or overruling tone </li></ul><ul><li>We are judgmental and critical of each other </li></ul><ul><li>Be receptive to more new ideas </li></ul><ul><li>Create a culture of mutual trust and unwavering support </li></ul>Decide and test the validity of what constitutes our “big assumptions”, the tenets in our mental models, that sustain our immune system First, list these big assumptions that are uncritically taken as being true Second, experiment in a safe environment to test their validity – modify assumptions accordingly which should have impact on Step 2 behaviors Determine Hidden Competing Commitments List those commitments that reinforce you doing Step 2 behaviors Reflect on what insights are revealed between reviewing disconnects and conflicts of Steps 3 and Step 1 Uncover what one is doing/not doing instead of improvement goals in Step 1 List behaviors that work against these goals Define “One Big Thing” from list of goals to be attained Gain visible commitment through behavioral improvement goals Step 4 Step 3 Step 2 Step 1
    • 13. Immunity to Change Template Worry Box: If you/team imagine yourself trying to do the opposite of step 2 behaviors, what is the most uncomfortable or worrisome or outright scary feeling that comes up for you. Do as many drafts as necessary based on meeting 4 criteria before moving on the next step…. Usually are out of sight – typically we are blinded to them Used Individually – start here first <ul><li>First, complete worry box. </li></ul><ul><li>Second, based on this raw material from the fear box, generate your hidden competing commitments. </li></ul><ul><li>These commitments are intended to minimize at all costs these fears from happening. </li></ul>Step 3 – Hidden Competing Commitment <ul><li>Take fearless inventory of all the things you are doing (or not doing) that work against your 1 st column goal. </li></ul><ul><li>The more concrete behaviors you can list the better. Indicate what you actually do or fail to do – don’t be general in your description like stating being impatient or feeling discomfort or have unpleasant feelings </li></ul><ul><li>The more items you enter, and the more honest you are, the greater the eventual diagnostic power of your map will be </li></ul><ul><li>Make sure everything you enter provides a picture of you working against your goal in step 1 </li></ul><ul><li>We are not interested in why you are doing these things, or for ideas or plans about how you can stop doing these things and get better </li></ul>Step 2 – Doing/not doing <ul><li>Adaptation will involve some recognition of and correction of, our blindness (our assumptions) </li></ul><ul><li>We begin with designing running and interpreting tests of the big assumptions. </li></ul><ul><li>First pick one big assumption you want to test based on: </li></ul><ul><li>It is a powerful assumption </li></ul><ul><li>It is testable </li></ul><ul><li>Use associated questionnaire to help make decision on picking big assumption. </li></ul><ul><li>Use Guide Sheet for designing a good test of the big assumption. </li></ul><ul><li>Use Guide Sheet for running tests of the big assumption. </li></ul><ul><li>Use Guide Sheet for interpreting tests of big assumption. </li></ul><ul><li>Consolidate your/team learning by identifying hooks and releases </li></ul><ul><li>Use Guide Sheet for Identifying hooks and releases </li></ul><ul><li>Once unconsciously released from big assumption, reengage ITC process for future success </li></ul><ul><li>Brainstorm all the possible assumptions that Step 3 commitments might hold. </li></ul><ul><li>Write a testable version of the your BA </li></ul><ul><li>Use the language tool of: I assume if I make a Step 3 commitment, I will not be able to …. </li></ul><ul><li>Evaluate big assumptions against following criteria: </li></ul><ul><li>Some of the big assumptions you may regard as true </li></ul><ul><li>It is clear how each of the big assumptions, if taken as true, makes one or more of Step 3 commitments inevitable </li></ul><ul><li>You see how your big assumptions constitute a “Danger” </li></ul><ul><li>Decide “Big Goal” based on iterating through following thought process: </li></ul><ul><li>It is really important to you it is a big deal if you could get dramatically better at it; there is sense of urgency about getting better at it; there is not just a feel good perspective but a need to attitude </li></ul><ul><li>It is important to others; others would value it highly if you/team got better at it. </li></ul><ul><li>Accomplishing goal directly implicates you focus of improvement is on yourself, not others </li></ul><ul><li>State your goal in the affirmative, not the negative </li></ul>Use 360 degree input to get perspectives on one big thing that would clearly make you add more value to the organization Use SMART Safe, Modest (S/M) Actionable (A) Research stance, Test (R/T) Step 4 – Big Assumption (BA) Step 1- Commitment Improvement goals Generating Ideas Pre-work
    • 14. Immunity to Change Template Worry Box: If team imagines team trying to do the opposite of step 2 behaviors, what is the most uncomfortable or worrisome or outright scary feeling that comes up for team. Do as many drafts as necessary based on meeting 4 criteria before moving on the next step…. Usually are out of sight – typically we are blinded to them Can be used collectively – once people experience individually <ul><li>First, complete worry box. </li></ul><ul><li>Second, based on this raw material from the fear box, generate team hidden competing commitments. </li></ul><ul><li>These commitments are intended to minimize at all costs these fears from happening. </li></ul>Step 3 – Hidden Competing Commitment <ul><li>Take fearless inventory of all the things team are doing (or not doing) that work against team 1 st column goal. </li></ul><ul><li>The more concrete behaviors team can list the better. Indicate what team actually do or fail to do – don’t be general in your description like stating being impatient or feeling discomfort or have unpleasant feelings </li></ul><ul><li>The more items team enter, and the more honest team is, the greater the eventual diagnostic power of team map will be </li></ul><ul><li>Make sure everything team enter provides a picture of team working against team goal in step 1 </li></ul><ul><li>We are not interested in why team are doing these things, or for ideas or plans about how team can stop doing these things and get better </li></ul>Step 2 – Doing/not doing <ul><li>Adaptation will involve some recognition of and correction of, our blindness (our assumptions) </li></ul><ul><li>We begin with designing running and interpreting tests of the big assumptions. </li></ul><ul><li>First pick one big assumption team wants to test based on: </li></ul><ul><li>It is a powerful assumption </li></ul><ul><li>It is testable </li></ul><ul><li>Use associated questionnaire to help make decision on picking big assumption. </li></ul><ul><li>Use Guide Sheet for designing a good test of the big assumption. </li></ul><ul><li>Use Guide Sheet for running tests of the big assumption. </li></ul><ul><li>Use Guide Sheet for interpreting tests of big assumption. </li></ul><ul><li>Consolidate your/team learning by identifying hooks and releases </li></ul><ul><li>Use Guide Sheet for Identifying hooks and releases </li></ul><ul><li>Once unconsciously released from big assumption, reengage ITC process for future success </li></ul><ul><li>Brainstorm all the possible assumptions that Step 3 commitments might hold. </li></ul><ul><li>Write a testable version of the Team’s r BA </li></ul><ul><li>Use the language tool of: Team assumes if team makes a Step 3 commitment, team will not be able to …. </li></ul><ul><li>Evaluate big assumptions against following criteria: </li></ul><ul><li>Some of the big assumptions team may regard as true </li></ul><ul><li>It is clear how each of the big assumptions, if taken as true, makes one or more of Step 3 commitments inevitable </li></ul><ul><li>Team sees how team big assumptions constitute a “Danger” </li></ul><ul><li>Decide “Big Goal” based on iterating through following thought process: </li></ul><ul><li>It is really important to team; it is a big deal if team could get dramatically better at it; there is sense of urgency about getting better at it; there is not just a feel good perspective but a need to attitude </li></ul><ul><li>It is important to others; others would value it highly if you/team got better at it. </li></ul><ul><li>Accomplishing goal directly implicates team; focus of improvement is on team, not others </li></ul><ul><li>State team goal in the affirmative, not the negative </li></ul>Use 360 degree input to get perspectives on one big thing that would clearly make the team add more value to the organization Use SMART Safe, Modest (S/M) Actionable (A) Research stance, Test (R/T) Step 4 – Big Assumption (BA) Step 1- Commitment Improvement goals Generating Ideas Pre-work
    • 15. Immunity to Change Worksheet Worry Box: Used Individually or Collectively Step 3 – Hidden Competing Commitment Step 2 – Doing/not doing Use SMART Safe, Modest (S/M) Actionable (A) Research stance, Test (R/T) Step 4 – Big Assumption (BA) Step 1- Commitment Improvement goals Generating Ideas Pre-work
    • 16. Associated BA Questionnaire <ul><li>Which BA jumps out at you/team as the one that most gets in your/team way? </li></ul><ul><li>If you/team could change any single BA, which one would make the biggest, most positive difference for you/team? </li></ul><ul><li>Is the BA so catastrophic that you/team could never test it? </li></ul><ul><li>Can you/team imagine some kind of information or data that would cast doubt on the big assumption? Is your/team assumption falsifiable? </li></ul>
    • 17. Guide Sheet for Designing Test <ul><li>Write below what you/team are doing to do (Make sure you/team are doing something different from what your/team BA would normally have you/team do.) </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Jot down how you/team think your/team test will get you/team information about your/team big assumption. </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Next, what data do you/team want to collect? In addition to how people react to you/team, your/team feelings can be a very rich data source. </li></ul><ul><ul><li>How will that data help you/team to confirm or disconfirm your/team BA? (What results would lead you/team to believe your/team BA is correct? What results would lead you/team to question the validity of your/team BA? </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Is there anyone you’d like to give a “heads-up” to ask to serve as an observer who can give you/team feedback after the fact? </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Review your/team test on these criteria: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Is it safe? (If the worst case were to happen, you/team could live with the results) </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Is the data relevant to your/team BA? </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Is it valid? (The test actually tests your/team BA.) </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Are the data sources valid? (Choose sources who are neither out to get you/team nor trying to protect or save you/team.) </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Might it actually reinforce your/team BA? (Is it designed so that it surely will lead to bad consequences, just as your/team BA tells you? Are you setting yourself/team up to fail? Is there any data you/team could colloct that would disconfirm your/team BA?) </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Can it be done soon? (The person or situation you/team need in order to enact the test is available, you/team are reasonably certain you/team know how to do what you/team plan, and you/team can run the test within the next week or so.) </li></ul></ul>
    • 18. Guide Sheet for Running Test <ul><li>What did you/team actually do? </li></ul><ul><li>What happened? </li></ul><ul><ul><li>What did people actually say or do when you/team ran your/team test? </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>If you/team asked someone for feedback, what did she or he say? </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>What were your/team thoughts and feelings at the time? (These are your/team data points) </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Check the quality of your/team data to make sure it is valid. </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Is the data about other people’s responses to you/team directly observable, or have you/team snuck in an interpretation? </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Would someone else in the room agree with your/team description? </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Were there any unusual circumstances in your/team test </li></ul></ul>
    • 19. Guide Sheet for Interpreting Test <ul><li>Take a look at the data you/team collected. </li></ul><ul><ul><li>What is your/team interpretation of what happened? </li></ul></ul><ul><li>What alternate interpretation can you/team think of for that same data? </li></ul><ul><ul><li>When our BAs have a powerful hold on us to predictable interpretations – ones that keep the BA alive and well. An antidote to this tendency is to push yourself/team to generate at least one additional interpretation of the data </li></ul></ul><ul><li>What does your/team interpretation tell you/team about the BA you/team tested? </li></ul><ul><ul><li>What aspects of the BA do you/team believe the data confirm? </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Which do the data disconfirm? </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Did any new assumptions emerge? </li></ul></ul><ul><li>What are your/team thoughts about a next test of your/team BA? Pick up on what you've learned about your/team BA. </li></ul><ul><ul><li>What next test could you/team design to learn more? </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>If you/team have additional Bas, you/team might want to test those too. </li></ul></ul>
    • 20. Guide Sheet for Hooks and Releases <ul><li>Comment on where you/team see yourself/team on the developmental sequence . </li></ul><ul><li>Have you/team reached any conclusions or developed any hunches about conditions under which your/team BA is valid? Think about particular situations – who, what, where, and when. </li></ul><ul><li>Have you/team reached any conclusions or developed any hunches about conditions under which your/team BA is invalid? Think about particular situations – who, what, where, and when. </li></ul><ul><li>Do you find your/team BA asserting itself in situations you/team know it shouldn’t? If so, can you/team generalize about the conditions under which you/team are likely (more or less) to find yourself/team being sucked into the old patterns associated with the BA? </li></ul><ul><ul><li>What still sometimes hooks you/team? </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Have you/team developed key releases (e.g., self-talk that unhooks you/team) that you/team can readily use to help yourself/team when recaptured by your/team BA in real time? </li></ul><ul><li>Have you/team developed new behaviors or ways of talking to yourself/team in situations that used to activate your/team BA? </li></ul><ul><li>To what extent/how often can you/team use these “releases” to help you/team from being pulled into old patterns? </li></ul><ul><li>Consider situations in which you/team think your/team BA is no longer accurate. What new beliefs or understandings do you/team hold about “how things work” or what will happen in these situations? </li></ul><ul><li>Any thoughts about what has enabled you/team to make the changes you/team have? </li></ul>Unconsciously Immune Consciously Immune Consciously Released Unconsciously Released
    • 21. Developmental Sequence <ul><li>Socialized Mind </li></ul><ul><ul><li>We are shaped by the definitions and expectations of our personal environment </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Our self coheres by its alignment with, and loyalty to, that with which it identifies </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>This can express itself primarily in our relationships with people, with “schools of thought” (our ideas and beliefs) or both </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Self-Authoring Mind </li></ul><ul><ul><li>We are able to step back enough from the social environment to generate an internal “seat of judgment” or personal authority that evaluates and makes choices about external expectations. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Our self coheres by its alignment with its own belief system/ideology/personal code; by its ability to self-direct, take stands, set limits, and create and regulate its boundaries on behalf of its own voice </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Self-Transformational Mind </li></ul><ul><ul><li>We can step back from and reflect on the limits of our own ideology or personal authority; see that any one system or self-organization is in some way partial or incomplete; be friendlier toward contradiction and opposites; seek to hold on to multiple systems rather than projecting all but one onto the other. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Our self coheres through its ability not to confuse internal consistency with wholeness or completeness, and through its alignment with the dialectic rather than either pole. </li></ul></ul>
    • 22. Leading Teams <ul><li>Is about leveraging your leadership map using the seven zones for leadership </li></ul>* Developed by Dr. Robert Terry
    • 23. Leadership Action Wheel Existence -- the history that limits and launches what we do (What is the history of this event or situation?) Resources -- the things that we use in what we do (What are the resources?) Structure -- the form and processes that support and sustain what we do (What are the plans and processes?) Power -- the commitment and passion that energize what we do (What is the stakeholders’ level of commitment?) Mission -- the aim and priority that give direction to what we do (What is the direction?) Meaning -- the justification and significance that tell us why or for what we do what we do (What is at stake?) Fulfillment -- the completed action that embraces existence, resources, structure, power, mission, and meaning (What is the event in its completed state?) Answers Question: What is going on?
    • 24. Fixable and Knowable I call them as they are Understandable I call them as I see them Unfixable and Unknowable There is not anything till I call them Three Worlds of Reality Certainty of Outcomes Agreement on Direction Stability Change High Low Tight Loose Zone 1 Serving the Past Zone 2 Building Core Competencies Zone 3 Systems Thinking Zone 4 Creating Ownership Zone 5 Focusing on the Future Zone 6 Creating Meaning in Chaos Zone 7 Serving the Promise of Authenticity Evolving Existence Evolving Resources Evolving Structure Evolving Power Evolving Mission Leadership Map Zone 7a Making Wise Choices Zone 7b Probing Deeper Zone 7c Living the Promise Chaos = Evolving Meaning Fulfillment Zone 3a Designing Sustainable Systems Zone 3b Affirming Shared Identity Zone 5a Setting the Direction Zone 5b Anticipating Change I serve balls and strikes as I serve the promise of baseball
    • 25. Leadership Zones and Action Wheel Zone 1 Existence -- the from of action: our history, past, and memories in which the action is rooted or from which it arises Zone 2 Resources -- the with which of action; valued items, both tangible and intangible, that we use in the action Zone 3 Structure -- the through which of action: how processes and procedures are designed and implemented to get the action accomplished Zone 4 Power -- the by which of action: the energy or spirit that infuses the action Zone 5 Mission -- the toward which action: the direction of the action Zone 6 Meaning -- the for which of action: the significance and rationale of the action Zone 7 Fulfillment -- the into which of action: the completed action
    • 26. Leadership Zone Matrix Zones Polarity Criteria Metaphor “ Life is a .. Core Ethical Principle Derailment 1. Serving the Past Stability/change Correspondence gift Sacred History Elimination 2. Building Core Competencies Potential/actual Consistency machine Freedom Exclusion (Discrimination) 3a. Designing Sustainable Systems Form /Dynamic Connectedness body Justice as fair inclusion Double Standards 3b. Affirming Shared Identity Form/ Dynamic Coherence body/living system Justice as constructive inclusion Rigidity 4. Creating Ownership Conceal/reveal Codetermination conflict between ups and downs Participation Oppression and abuse 5a. Setting Direction Ends /Means Convergence journey with focus on destination Caring as Sharing Discounting 5b. Anticipating Change Ends/ Means Conveyance journey with focus on trip Caring as listening Ignoring 6. Creating Meaning in Chaos Seriousness/playfulness Co-creation & connectedness art Responsibility Abdication 7a. Making Wise Choices One/many Congruence & Comprehensiveness polarity Authenticity Inauthenticity and evil 7b. Probing Deeper Part/whole Configuration paradoxical puzzle Authenticity Inauthenticity and evil 7c. Living the Promise Inside/outside and on to paradox Configuration welcoming promise Authenticity Inauthenticity and evil
    • 27. Deep self-awareness; Faith in the promise of hope; Wisdom; Adeptness; Learning agility and inquiry; Listening to the stirrings; Mapping complex issues; Polarity and paradoxical thinking and living; A commitment to face spirituality, even theology, without getting trapped by exclusionary religious boundaries Leadership Zone Competencies Zones Commitments and Abilities that Require Development Stirrings 1. Serving the Past Historical sensibility and knowledge; core value identification; willingness to face hard truths from the past; commitment to preserve the best by means of celebration, orientation, seminars, speeches, and other Past share events Negative: stuck in the past, denial; Positive: Desire to do something 2. Building Core Competencies Mastering of technical skills of the discipline or subject matter needed: Finance and accounting knowledge and skills; Assessment of consistency of service or product quality; Project management; Supervisory excellence Negative: arrogance, narrow focus Positive: Get in touch with more people 3a. Designing Sustainable Systems Systems thinking: System design; Team participation; Awareness and need for needs-assessment surveys; Willingness to break out of silos and share wisdom across boundaries Negative: rigid, inflexible; Positive: Desire to know where system is going 3b. Affirming Shared Identity Commitment to develop the full array of emotional intelligence competencies; Team building and group participation; Ethical awareness and sense of core and shared values; executive strategic thinking and planning; Knowledge of the critical importance of identity affirmations Negative: workers left out; Positive: workers seeking voice 4. Creating Ownership Conflict negotiation skills; Personal empowerment with exit card; Buffalo self assessment -- know what decisions to keep, what to share, and what to release; Commitment to participatory actions and events Negative: fear of being surprised by something; Positive: curious about future 5a. Setting Direction Commitment to participatory visioning processes with appropriate foundations and planning skills; Awareness of the necessity of clarifying the destination; Confidence to move forward; Collective strategic planning process skills Negative: anxiety because too far out there; Positive: awareness that unknowable can happen 5b. Anticipating Change Pattern recognition; Scenario writing; Scanning; Framing; Metaphorical thinking; New insight generation; Commitment to authenticity thinking 6. Creating Meaning in Chaos Process wisdom; Courage that moves beyond risk-taking; Framing; Pattern recognition and serious writing; A profound understanding of serious play Negative: angst, what is meaning; Positive:deep quest for meaning 7a. Making Wise Choices Negative: self righteousness; Positive: desire for committed service 7b. Probing Deeper 7c. Living the Promise
    • 28. Leadership Perspectives
    • 29. Seven Zones of Leadership Summary
    • 30. Leading Teams <ul><li>Is about being in the fundamental state of leadership </li></ul>* Developed by Dr. Robert Quinn
    • 31. What is the Normal State? Self-Focused Internally Closed Externally Directed Comfort-Centered I tend to be ego driven, putting my interests ahead of the collective interests in a given relationship or set of relationships. I tend to stay in my comfort zone, denying external signals for change. I tend to define myself by how I think (perceive) I am seen and how well I am able to obtain external resources. I tend to engage in problem-solving activities, thus living in a reactive state.
    • 32. What is the Fundamental State? Other-Focused Externally Open Internally-Directed Purpose-Centered I am transcending my ego, putting the common good and welfare of others first, increasing in authenticity and transparency, nurturing trust, and enriching the levels of connectivity in my networks. I am moving outside my comfort zone, experimenting, seeking real feedback, adapting, and reaching exponentially higher levels of discovery, awareness, competency, and vision. I am continually examining my hypocrisy and closing the gaps between my values and behavior. I am reaching higher levels of personal security and confidence. I am clarifying what result I want to create. I am committed and engaged, full of energy and holding an unwavering standard as I pursue a meaningful task.
    • 33. What are Four Change Strategies? The Participating Strategy The Transcending Strategy The Forcing Strategy The Telling Strategy Emphasis : Relationship and open dialogue Are all included in open dialogue? Do I model supportive communication? Is everyone’s position being clarified? Am I surfacing the conflicts? Are decisions made participatively? Are the people cohesive? Emphasis : Potential and transcending self Am I internally directed? Is my purpose clear? Am I externally open, moving forward into uncertainty? Are people walking with me into uncertainty? Emphasis : Authority and Leveraging Is my authority firmly established? Is the legitimacy of my directive clear? Am I capable of imposing sanctions? Is there a clear performance-reward linkage? Am I using maximum leverage? Are the people complying? Emphasis : Facts and rational persuasion Am I within my expertise? Have I gathered all the facts? Have I done a good analysis? Will my conclusions withstand criticism? Are my arguments clear? Are the people listening? Interpersonal Perspective Political Perspective Transformational Perspective Technical Perspective Logic Compliance Trust Vision Structure and Control Preservation of the System External Alignment of the System Possibility and Emergence
    • 34. Fundamental State Leadership Competencies Being able to deal with Polarities Compassionate vs . concerned/assertive vs. bold Spontaneous vs. expressive/self disciplined vs. freedom Mindful vs. reflective/active vs. energetic Principled vs. integrated/engaged vs. involved Realistic vs. questioning/optimistic vs. constructive Grounded vs. factual/visionary vs. hopeful Confident vs. secure/humble vs. flexible Independent vs. strong/humble vs. open Creative States Responsible Freedom Detached Inter- dependence Appreciative Inquiry Authentic Engagement Adaptive Confidence Tough Love Reflective Action Grounded Vision Ever-Increasing Integrity
    • 35. Negative Positive Integrative Positive Negative Negative Positive Integrative Positive Negative Negative Positive Integrative Positive Negative Negative Positive Integrative Positive Negative Stagnate;Inactive Mindful/Reflective Reflective & Active Active/Energetic Mindless/unreflective Self-righteous;withdrawn Principled;integrated Principled & Engaged Engaged;involved Compromised;unprincipled Unrealistic;unquestioning Optimistic;constructive Constructive & Analytic Realistic;questioning Pessimistic;destructive Ungrounded;deluded Visionary;hopeful Grounded & visionary Grounded;factual Visionless;hopeless Reflective Action Authentic Engagement Appreciative Inquiry Grounded Vision Fundamental State Leadership Competencies’ Assessment -3 -2 -1 1 2 3 4 5 4 3 2 1 -1 -2 -3 -3 -2 -1 1 2 3 4 5 4 3 2 1 -1 -2 -3 -3 -2 -1 1 2 3 4 5 4 3 2 1 -1 -2 -3 -3 -2 -1 1 2 3 4 5 4 3 2 1 -1 -2 -3
    • 36. Negative Positive Integrative Positive Negative Negative Positive Integrative Positive Negative Negative Positive Integrative Positive Negative Negative Positive Integrative Positive Negative Uncertain;insecure Adaptive;flexible Adaptive & Confident Confident;secure Rigid;inflexible Dependent;weak Humble;open Humble & strong Independent;strong Arrogant;closed Undisciplined; Spontaneous; Self-disciplined & Self-disciplined & Unexpressive; spontaneous irresponsible expressive responsible guarded Indulgent; Compassionate; Compassionate Assertive; Oppressive; permissive concerned and assertive bold overbearing Adaptive Confidence Detached Interdependence Responsible Freedom Tough Love Fundamental State Leadership Competencies’ Assessment -3 -2 -1 1 2 3 4 5 4 3 2 1 -1 -2 -3 -3 -2 -1 1 2 3 4 5 4 3 2 1 -1 -2 -3 -3 -2 -1 1 2 3 4 5 4 3 2 1 -1 -2 -3 -3 -2 -1 1 2 3 4 5 4 3 2 1 -1 -2 -3
    • 37. Leading Teams <ul><li>Is about using effectively previous learning on: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>overcoming the five dysfunctions of teams </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>applying leadership and self deception principles </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>enabling your personal assessment data dealing with thinking preferences, work preferences and information processing styles </li></ul></ul>
    • 38. Eight Characteristics of Effective Working Groups <ul><li>Enthusiastically focus on results rather than on doing particular duties or following certain processes. </li></ul><ul><li>Enthusiastically help others get results. </li></ul><ul><li>Actively learn and teach. </li></ul><ul><li>Focus on solutions to problems, not on the problem itself or who is to blame. </li></ul>Comes from sessions on Leadership and Self Deception
    • 39. Eight Characteristics of Effective Working Groups (continued) <ul><li>Take correction easily. </li></ul><ul><li>Hold themselves accountable. </li></ul><ul><li>Take responsibility and acknowledge mistakes. </li></ul><ul><li>Inspire trust. </li></ul>Comes from sessions on Leadership and Self Deception
    • 40. Overcoming the Five Dysfunctions of Teams Gaining Trust Mastering Conflict Achieving Commitment Embracing Accountability Focusing on Results Comes from sessions on Leadership and Self Deception
    • 41. Working on Trust Profiling Tools Are Useful in Building Trust -- Having refreshing conversations and sensitivities around MBTI, TMP, IOPT and EQ-I helps
    • 42. Working on Conflict Resolution
    • 43. Working on Commitment
    • 44. Working on Accountability
    • 45. Working on Results Distractions include ego, career advancement, money, priority on leading team versus being member
    • 46. Team Analysis and the IOPT * Developed by Dr. Gary Salton
    • 47. Input-Output Strategies Graph REACTIVE STIMULATOR LOGICAL PROCESSOR RELATIONAL INNOVATOR HYPOTHETICAL ANALYZER Unpatterned Input Action Output Structured Input Thought Output Unpatterned Input Thought Output Structured Input Action Output
    • 48. The Strategic Styles Dynamic Styles Combination Reactive Stimulator Relational Innovator Logical Processor Hypothetical Analyzer Team Work Changer Performer Conservator Perfector
    • 49. The Team Dynamic Effective teaming requires an understanding of our different interaction styles and an ability to utilize the appropriate style necessary to produce the results needed by the team or organization at any given time.
    • 50. The IOPT and Team Dynamics <ul><li>As part of a system, Teams are like the RNA that help deliver the Organization’s focused vision (Individual’s are like the DNA) </li></ul><ul><li>Closing the performance gaps of teams are challenges that require a highly effective leadership. </li></ul><ul><li>Being effective as a team means to maximize our combined strengths and minimize our combined vulnerabilities. </li></ul><ul><li>There is a cost attached to a lack of team effectiveness, e.g.: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>quality and speed of actions, decisions, strategies </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>transaction cost of relationship </li></ul></ul>
    • 51. Strategic Styles & Teams
    • 52. Strategic Styles & Teams Core orientation: 100% overlap in same basic orientation. Consensus decisions likely to reflect orientation of this area. Decisions made wouldn’t compromise preferences Secondary orientation: 50% or more overlap in same basic orientation. Majority decisions likely to reflect orientation of this area Tertiary orientation: Reflects minority of team’s orientation. Area of council/recommendation
    • 53. Developed by: Team Analysis and the STDP
    • 54. THE HIGH ENERGY TEAMS MODEL All processes need to be implemented with a strong emphasis on Linking What Should happen compared with What Does happen What Should happen indicates Importance or Priority The difference between what Should and Does occur indicates Satisfaction of Performance
    • 55. Developed by: Team Analysis - TOW and TMP
    • 56. TYPES OF WORK MODEL What Should happen compared with What Does happen What Should happen indicates Importance or Priority The difference between what Should and Does occur indicates Satisfaction of Performance Every project contains these 8 activities
    • 57. The Types of Work Model Key Research Finding To sustain high performance, teams and individuals need to find balance in the performance of the various work functions
    • 58. ADVISING Gathering and Reporting Information
    • 59. INNOVATING <ul><li>Creating and experimenting with ideas </li></ul>
    • 60. PROMOTING <ul><li>Exploring </li></ul><ul><li>and </li></ul><ul><li>Presenting </li></ul><ul><li>Opportunities </li></ul>
    • 61. DEVELOPING <ul><li>Assessing and Testing the Applicability of New Approaches </li></ul>
    • 62. ORGANIZING <ul><li>Establishing </li></ul><ul><li>and </li></ul><ul><li>Implementing </li></ul><ul><li>Ways of Making </li></ul><ul><li>Things Work </li></ul>
    • 63. PRODUCING Concluding and Delivering Outputs
    • 64. INSPECTING <ul><li>Controlling and </li></ul><ul><li>Auditing the Working of Systems </li></ul>Inspecting
    • 65. MAINTAINING <ul><li>Upholding and Safeguarding Standards and Processes </li></ul>
    • 66. L I N K I N G <ul><li>Integrating and Coordinating the Work of Others </li></ul>THE “KEY” TO SUCCESS ! Linking
    • 67. Types of Work Summary <ul><li>ADVISING – Gathering & reporting information. </li></ul><ul><li>INNOVATING – Creating & experimenting with ideas. </li></ul><ul><li>PROMOTING – Exploring & presenting opportunities. </li></ul><ul><li>DEVELOPING – Assessing & testing the applicability of new ideas. </li></ul><ul><li>ORGANIZING – Establishing & implementing ways of making things work. </li></ul><ul><li>PRODUCING – Concluding & delivering outputs. </li></ul><ul><li>INSPECTING – Controlling & auditing the working of systems. </li></ul><ul><li>MAINTANING – Upholding & safeguarding standards & procedures. </li></ul><ul><li>L I N K I N G – Coordinating & integrating the work of others. </li></ul>
    • 68. MEASURES OF WORK PREFERENCE RELATIONSHIPS INFORMATION DECISION MAKING ORGANIZATION Extroversion (E) Introversion (I) Practical (S) Creative (N) Analytical (T) Beliefs (F) Structured (J) Flexible (P) Where do we go to trust the source of our information? How do I like to look at my Information? How do I like to make judgments about my information? How do I prefer to plan concerning my information?
    • 69. MEASURES OF WORK PREFERENCE RELATIONSHIPS Extroversion (E) Introversion (I) <ul><li>Extroversion </li></ul><ul><li>Will often think things out by talking them through. </li></ul><ul><li>Enjoy meeting other people in the work environment and will often seek out these opportunities. </li></ul><ul><li>Enjoy a variety of tasks and activities. </li></ul><ul><li>Are often stimulated by unanticipated interruptions. </li></ul><ul><li>When speaking publicly will often talk impromptu. </li></ul><ul><li>Likely to contribute readily at meetings. </li></ul><ul><li>Can be impulsive. </li></ul><ul><li>Introversion </li></ul><ul><li>Prefer to think things out before speaking. </li></ul><ul><li>Do not have a high need to meet regularly with others. </li></ul><ul><li>Like to concentrate in depth at a few tasks at a time. </li></ul><ul><li>Tend to dislike unanticipated interruptions. </li></ul><ul><li>When speaking publicly will prepare in depth and speak to a plan. </li></ul><ul><li>May be more quiet at meetings or take more time to contribute. </li></ul><ul><li>Likely to consider things before acting. </li></ul>
    • 70. MEASURES OF WORK PREFERENCE INFORMATION Practical (Structured) Creative (iNtuition) <ul><li>Practical </li></ul><ul><li>Prefer defined problems. </li></ul><ul><li>Oriented towards the present. </li></ul><ul><li>Likes to work with tested ideas. </li></ul><ul><li>Down to earth and like to work with real things. </li></ul><ul><li>Patient with routine work. </li></ul><ul><li>Prefers schedules, standard systems and procedures. </li></ul><ul><li>Pays attention to facts and details. </li></ul><ul><li>Usually sound on details but may struggle to see the big picture. </li></ul><ul><li>Creative </li></ul><ul><li>Enjoys ambiguous problems. </li></ul><ul><li>Oriented towards the future. </li></ul><ul><li>Regularly generate new ideas. </li></ul><ul><li>Like to work with possibilities, theories and implications. </li></ul><ul><li>Tend to get bored with routine work. </li></ul><ul><li>Always looking for a new way to do things. </li></ul><ul><li>May lose sight of details and jump beyond the facts. </li></ul><ul><li>Will often see the big picture first but struggle with the details of that picture. </li></ul>
    • 71. MEASURES OF WORK PREFERENCE DECISION MAKING Analytical (Thinking) Beliefs (Feeling) <ul><li>Analytical </li></ul><ul><li>Tries to establish objective decision making criteria. </li></ul><ul><li>Measures decisions against payoffs. </li></ul><ul><li>Sometimes seen as detached. </li></ul><ul><li>Will emphasize deciding based on the logic of the given situation. </li></ul><ul><li>Will negotiate on evidence. </li></ul><ul><li>Concerned for fairness based on the rules. </li></ul><ul><li>Likes analysis and clarity. </li></ul><ul><li>Task oriented and will set objectives based on the needs of those tasks. </li></ul><ul><li>Beliefs </li></ul><ul><li>Prefer personal, subjective decision making criteria. </li></ul><ul><li>Measures decisions against personal beliefs. </li></ul><ul><li>Sometimes seen as over committed to a point of view. </li></ul><ul><li>Often decide on personal considerations. </li></ul><ul><li>Will negotiate on rights and wrongs of the issues. </li></ul><ul><li>Concern for fairness based on beliefs. </li></ul><ul><li>Likes harmony based on common values. </li></ul><ul><li>Tasks and objectives will emerge from beliefs. </li></ul>
    • 72. MEASURES OF WORK PREFERENCE ORGANIZATION Structured (Judgment) Flexible (Perception) <ul><li>Structured </li></ul><ul><li>Likes clarity and order. </li></ul><ul><li>Concerned with bringing issues to closure. </li></ul><ul><li>Will develop and stick to a plan. </li></ul><ul><li>May rush decisions in the drive for closure. </li></ul><ul><li>Tends to keep to deadlines. </li></ul><ul><li>Reluctant to change once decisions and plans are made. </li></ul><ul><li>Tends to dislike ambiguity. </li></ul><ul><li>Enjoys decision making over diagnosing. </li></ul><ul><li>Flexible </li></ul><ul><li>May appear disorganized compared to typical work standards. </li></ul><ul><li>Concerned with gathering information about issues. </li></ul><ul><li>Plans may be altered regularly. </li></ul><ul><li>May delay decisions for more information. </li></ul><ul><li>May see deadlines as irrelevant. </li></ul><ul><li>Open and comfortable with change. </li></ul><ul><li>Tends to tolerate ambiguity well.. </li></ul><ul><li>Enjoys diagnosing over decision making. </li></ul>
    • 73. TYPES OF WORK MODEL E I C P F S B A
    • 74. Team Management Profile
    • 75. RELATIONSHIPS INFORMATION DECISION MAKING ORGANIZATION + = The Types of Work Model The Measures of Work Preference The Team Management Wheel + =
    • 76. Team Analysis and Comparing MBTI with TMP Work Preferences
    • 77. MBTI/TMP Sixteen Fold Model Comparison ISTJ ESFJ ESTJ INTJ ENTJ ESTP ENTP ENFJ INTP INFP ESFP INFJ ISFP N ISFJ ISTP ENFP S P J T F
    • 78. Leading Teams <ul><li>Is connecting people and task skills with leadership </li></ul>
    • 79. LINKING <ul><li>INTEGRATING AND COORDINATING THE WORK OF OTHERS </li></ul>
    • 80. Linking Leader Skills
    • 81. People Linking Skills
    • 82. Six People Linking Skills <ul><li>People Linking Skills create the atmosphere in which the team works </li></ul><ul><li>They foster harmony and trust </li></ul>
    • 83. <ul><li>Listening to others and showing them you are interested by: </li></ul><ul><li>*Asking questions </li></ul><ul><li>*Building on what they say </li></ul><ul><li>*Summarizing what has been said. </li></ul>
    • 84. <ul><li>Vary your communication style by ‘pacing’ </li></ul><ul><li>Use the ‘Platinum rule’ rather than the ‘Golden rule’ </li></ul><ul><ul><li>&quot; The Golden Rule implies the basic assumption that other people would like to be treated the way that you would like to be treated. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>The Platinum Rule implies &quot;Treat others the way they want to be treated.&quot; </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Use the Power of Future Conversations </li></ul>
    • 85. <ul><li>Respect </li></ul><ul><li>Understanding </li></ul><ul><li>Trust </li></ul>
    • 86. <ul><li>Be Available </li></ul><ul><li>Be Responsive </li></ul><ul><li>Help them look for both the opportunities and the obstacles </li></ul>
    • 87. <ul><li>Involve all in key decisions </li></ul><ul><li>Ownership increases commitment </li></ul><ul><li>Balance effectiveness between telling people what to do and wasting time in endless meetings to achieve consensus </li></ul>
    • 88. <ul><li>Internal Linking </li></ul><ul><li>External Linking </li></ul><ul><li>Informal Linking </li></ul>
    • 89. Task Linking Skills
    • 90. Five Task Linking Skills <ul><li>Task Linking Skills create a solid core or foundation for teamwork </li></ul><ul><li>They promote harmony and stability </li></ul>
    • 91. <ul><li>Assign tasks to match competence AND preference </li></ul>
    • 92. <ul><li>Balance your team </li></ul><ul><li>Stretch people’s skills </li></ul><ul><li>Use their strengths but improve their weaknesses </li></ul>
    • 93. <ul><li>Outputs </li></ul><ul><li>Outcomes </li></ul><ul><li>Clear Accountability </li></ul><ul><li>Stretch goals </li></ul>
    • 94. <ul><li>Selection </li></ul><ul><li>Training </li></ul><ul><li>Competence </li></ul><ul><li>Confidence </li></ul><ul><li>Trust </li></ul>
    • 95. <ul><li>Agreed standards </li></ul><ul><li>Monitored procedures </li></ul><ul><li>Deliver the ‘right’ quality but always continuously improving </li></ul>
    • 96. Leadership Linking Skills
    • 97. <ul><li>Articulates a compelling vision of the team’s future </li></ul><ul><li>Inspires team members to perform </li></ul><ul><li>Is someone team members want to follow </li></ul><ul><li>Can make others feel optimistic about the future </li></ul><ul><li>Focuses unwaveringly on clear goals </li></ul><ul><li>Takes a stand on controversial issues affecting the team. </li></ul>
    • 98. <ul><li>Is an effective strategic thinker </li></ul><ul><li>Analyzes situations clearly and logically </li></ul><ul><li>Critically examines assumptions to discover potential weaknesses </li></ul><ul><li>Keeps in focus all elements of a complex issue </li></ul><ul><li>Is able to think ahead and see problems before they arise </li></ul><ul><li>Knows ‘where we are going’ and ‘how to get there’ </li></ul>
    • 99. Pacing <ul><li>Appreciating that different people prefer different ways of communicating. </li></ul><ul><li>Altering your style to match the person you are communicating with. </li></ul>
    • 100. PACING THE REPORTER-ADVISER <ul><li>Be flexible </li></ul><ul><li>Develop personal relationships </li></ul><ul><li>Be cooperative </li></ul><ul><li>Give personal thanks </li></ul><ul><li>Establish harmony </li></ul><ul><li>Allow them to express their concerns </li></ul><ul><li>Don’t put the facts before feelings </li></ul><ul><li>Don’t move too fast </li></ul><ul><li>Don’t be insincere </li></ul>
    • 101. <ul><li>Explore ideas </li></ul><ul><li>Be enthusiastic </li></ul><ul><li>Ensure you have some knowledge of the area under discussion </li></ul><ul><li>Give personal thanks </li></ul><ul><li>Tolerate their disorganized ways </li></ul><ul><li>Record important agreements in writing </li></ul><ul><li>Don’t be too structured </li></ul><ul><li>Don’t force them into difficult deadlines </li></ul><ul><li>Don’t be too convergent in your thinking </li></ul>PACING THE CREATOR-INNOVATOR
    • 102. PACING THE EXPLORER-PROMOTER <ul><li>Explore ideas </li></ul><ul><li>Allow them to talk </li></ul><ul><li>Concentrate on the future </li></ul><ul><li>Be enthusiastic </li></ul><ul><li>Record important agreements in writing </li></ul><ul><li>Be flexible </li></ul><ul><li>Don’t talk about details </li></ul><ul><li>Don’t take issue with their opinions unless they persist </li></ul><ul><li>Don’t dwell unnecessarily on the past </li></ul>
    • 103. PACING THE ASSESSOR-DEVELOPER <ul><li>Be prepared </li></ul><ul><li>Analyze issues fully </li></ul><ul><li>Explore possibilities </li></ul><ul><li>Be factual </li></ul><ul><li>Speak clearly, logically, and precisely </li></ul><ul><li>Think laterally </li></ul><ul><li>Don’t talk about subjects you know little about </li></ul><ul><li>Don’t give too many opinions </li></ul><ul><li>Don’t waste time </li></ul>
    • 104. PACING THE THRUSTER-ORGANIZER <ul><li>Be factual </li></ul><ul><li>Be goal-oriented </li></ul><ul><li>Be punctual </li></ul><ul><li>Make things happen </li></ul><ul><li>Summarize regularly </li></ul><ul><li>Don’t attack personally but focus on the facts surrounding disagreements </li></ul><ul><li>Don’t be ambiguous </li></ul><ul><li>Don’t get off the subject </li></ul>
    • 105. PACING THE CONCLUDER-PRODUCER <ul><li>Be structured </li></ul><ul><li>Give notice of proposed changes </li></ul><ul><li>Be practical </li></ul><ul><li>Stick to your word </li></ul><ul><li>Keep to deadlines </li></ul><ul><li>Focus on results </li></ul><ul><li>Don’t change your mind too frequently </li></ul><ul><li>Don’t waffle </li></ul>
    • 106. PACING THE CONTROLLER-INSPECTOR <ul><li>Use memos </li></ul><ul><li>Send written information prior to meeting </li></ul><ul><li>Slow down your pace </li></ul><ul><li>Take time to understand them </li></ul><ul><li>Talk about details </li></ul><ul><li>Think before you speak </li></ul><ul><li>Don’t surprise them </li></ul><ul><li>Don’t rush them </li></ul><ul><li>Don’t concentrate on the future at the expense of the past </li></ul>
    • 107. PACING THE UPHOLDER-MAINTAINER <ul><li>Develop personal relationships </li></ul><ul><li>Be clear and precise </li></ul><ul><li>Encourage them to talk </li></ul><ul><li>Be supportive </li></ul><ul><li>Don’t dominate discussions </li></ul><ul><li>Don’t ignore their feelings </li></ul>
    • 108. Leading Teams <ul><li>Is designing and redesigning oneself through Adhocracy </li></ul>* Developed by Dr. Sheila Sheinberg
    • 109. Kaleidoscope Model The ADHOCRACY* * Developed by Dr. Sheila Sheinberg
    • 110. “ We have learned that… the past will be a poor guide to the future and that we shall forever be dealing with unanticipated events. Given that scenario, organizations… will need individuals who delight in the unknown. - Charles Handy
    • 111. The ADHOCRACY: The Creative, Adaptive, Responsive, Agile Organization What is it?
    • 112. The Adhocracy Organization Self-Managing Process Project Teams Self-Managing Process Project Teams Linkages
    • 113. The organization has the ability to systematically and dynamically change it’s scope to respond to signals from the environment. THE ADHOCRACY
    • 114. A continually changing business and social environment requires a continually changeable organization just to keep pace. Leaders must learn to think of organizing as a verb, an active verb...
    • 115. Self Managing Process Project Teams What do they “Manage”? <ul><li>Manage and improve their process </li></ul><ul><li>Manage their relationships with </li></ul><ul><li>customers and suppliers </li></ul><ul><li>Manage the team’s collaboration </li></ul><ul><li>Manage “action” learning </li></ul><ul><li>Manage oneself </li></ul>
    • 116. The Process Structured Organization The “Value” of Process: <ul><li>Organize around process (es) </li></ul><ul><li>Listen to the “voice” of the process </li></ul><ul><li>Improve the process (es) </li></ul><ul><li>Manage the process (es) </li></ul><ul><li>Measure the process (es) </li></ul><ul><li>Evaluate the results </li></ul><ul><li>Develop people </li></ul>
    • 117. A B C D 1 2 Horizontal Workflow Organizations Versus Vertically Structured Organizations Creating New Organizational Lifelines From Bureaucracy to Adhocracy
    • 118. The ADHOCRACY: The Creative, Adaptive, Responsive, Agile Organization It's about the DESIGN
    • 119. <ul><li>Designed to be designed and redesigned as needed . </li></ul><ul><li>Designed to repeatedly succeed in an erratic, often unpredictable, for sure, constantly changing environment. </li></ul><ul><li>Designed to provide a superior capacity to address unanticipated challenges and opportunities, to be creative. </li></ul><ul><li>Designed to redefine and re-deploy human, </li></ul><ul><li>physical and financial resources, as needed . </li></ul><ul><li>Designed to facilitate multiple, even </li></ul><ul><li>simultaneous reconfigurations of </li></ul><ul><li>various components of the </li></ul><ul><li>organizational structure. </li></ul>The Adhocracy: An Adaptive Enterprise Design Specifications:
    • 120. <ul><li>Designed for a flexible workforce that can accept frequent new deployments, multiple simultaneous team assignments, continual reprioritization of priorities, and process ownership. </li></ul>The Adhocracy: An Adaptive Enterprise Design Specifications: <ul><li>Designed to help people view a continuous flow of unplanned activities as simply the inevitable price to be paid for living and working in a changing world. </li></ul><ul><li>Designed to be boundary adaptable. </li></ul>
    • 121. The Adhocracy Organization Self-Managing Process Enterprise Teams Self-Managing Process Project Teams Linkages
    • 122. The ADHOCRACY: The Creative, Adaptive, Responsive, Agile Organization It's about the PEOPLE
    • 123. <ul><li>Who works in the Adhocracy? </li></ul><ul><li>What skills do they need? </li></ul><ul><li>What knowledge must they possess? </li></ul><ul><li>How are they managed? </li></ul>The Adhocracy: Some Important Questions to Ponder Questions:
    • 124. <ul><li>Share a deep sense of shared purpose. </li></ul><ul><li>Feel valued because of “ performance, ” not tenure. </li></ul><ul><li>Believe they will earn advancement because of their ability to build knowledge and master change. </li></ul><ul><li>Refuse to be trapped by past success or current pathologies. </li></ul>The Adhocracy: An Adaptive Enterprise Who Works In The Adhocracy ? People who must… <ul><li>Operate well within flexible interpretations of their </li></ul><ul><li>existing roles and assume they may face completely new job responsibilities on a periodic basis. </li></ul>
    • 125. <ul><li>Be comfortable and productive working in synergistic, process focused and cross-functional work teams. </li></ul><ul><li>Be comfortable dealing with constantly evolving initiatives and an abundance of diverse ideas. </li></ul><ul><li>Be comfortable engaging in uninhibited dialogue, straight-forward feedback, and open, constructive conflict. </li></ul>The Adhocracy: An Adaptive Enterprise Who Works In The Adhocracy ? People who must…
    • 126. The ADHOCRACY: The Creative, Adaptive, Responsive, Agile Organization It's about Skills and Knowledge
    • 127. <ul><li>People who find order within what appears to be chaos. </li></ul><ul><li>People who proactively engage change . </li></ul>The Adhocracy: An Adaptive Enterprise What skills and Knowledge must they possess? “ In the Adhocracy, You need to develop, or hire, the “ADHO” mind-set and skill-set.” <ul><li>People who are resourceful, multi-skilled, highly motivated. </li></ul><ul><li>People who have a high tolerance for ambiguity. </li></ul>
    • 128. <ul><li>People who are positive they can succeed in unfamiliar circumstances. </li></ul><ul><li>People who remain focused on objectives during times of confusion. </li></ul><ul><li>People who are flexible concerning how to address barriers. </li></ul>The Adhocracy: An Adaptive Enterprise What skills and Knowledge must they possess? “ In the Adhocracy, You need to develop, or hire, the “ADHO” mind-set and skill-set.”
    • 129. <ul><li>People who have a desire to experiment. </li></ul>The Adhocracy: An Adaptive Enterprise <ul><li>People who are willing to appropriately challenge authority. </li></ul><ul><li>People who focus on the success of the entire enterprise. </li></ul>What skills and Knowledge must they possess? “ In the Adhocracy, You need to develop, or hire, the “ADHO” mind-set and skill-set.”
    • 130. The Adhocracy Organization Self-Managing Process Project Teams Self-Managing Process Project Teams Linkages
    • 131. Client A Vision Strategic Plans Corporate Goals Philosophy Realism Critical Linkage Mission Statement Values Knowledge Know-How Know-Who Know-Why Know-When Know-What Know-Where Process A Project A Process B Project B
    • 132. The ADHOCRACY: The Creative, Adaptive, Responsive, Agile Organization It's about LEADERSHIP
    • 133. The ADHOCRACY The “Kaleidoscope” Model … same components, multiple configurations . Transformation
    • 134. Leading Teams <ul><li>Is Reinforcing the System Using Applied Behavioral Analysis </li></ul>
    • 135. Applied Behavioral Analysis Developing Leadership Behavior That Drives Profitability In Your Organization* * Based on the Work of Leslie Braksick, Ph.D.
    • 136. Discretionary Performance Poor Leadership Coercive Leadership Effective Leadership Desired Acceptable Undesired Discretionary Performance Acceptable but minimal performance Unsatisfactory performance
    • 137. Key Takeaways <ul><li>Your behavior -- everyone’s -- is a response to the environment you work in </li></ul><ul><li>Your leadership behavior profoundly and directly affects everyone within your organization </li></ul><ul><li>Leaders have both an economic and moral imperative to unlock behavior in their organizations </li></ul><ul><li>Powerful behavioral tools are at your fingertips for improving your own leadership behavior and unlocking everyone;s performance </li></ul>
    • 138. IMPACT Model Step 1 & 2 Identify and Measure Target Results Step 3 Pinpoint Critical Few Behaviors Step 4 Activate & Consequate Desired Behavior Step 5 Transfer Fluency to Sustain Behavior
    • 139. Takeaways on Pinpointing <ul><li>Always start by identifying the business opportunity and concrete results measures </li></ul><ul><li>Results measures are always the foundation for behavioral targets (pinpoints) </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Select the right behavior </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Describe the behavior </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Use Norms of Objectivity to help </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Not an Interpretation </li></ul></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Observable </li></ul></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Reliable </li></ul></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Measurable </li></ul></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Specific </li></ul></ul></ul></ul><ul><li>Pinpointing is not always enough to create success </li></ul><ul><ul><li>You must ensure pinpoints are aligned </li></ul></ul>
    • 140. Activate & Consequate <ul><li>Begins with ABC analysis </li></ul>A Antecedents B Behavior C Consequences Every behavior has one or more antecedents that prompt or trigger it to happen The arrow between Behavior and Consequences points right because consequences follow behaviors, and left because consequences determine whether the behavior will recur Every behavior has consequences, which are powerful, for they control whether the behavior will recur. 80 % Influential 20 % Influential Conduct a Consequence Analysis E-TIP Effect: Encouraging or Discouraging Timing: Immediate or Delayed Importance: High or Low Probability: Likely or Unlikely
    • 141. Four Ways to Deliver Consequences <ul><li>Feedback Consequences </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Positive Feedback </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Constructive Feedback </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Tangible Consequences </li></ul><ul><li>Activity Consequences </li></ul><ul><li>Work Process Consequences </li></ul>Align Consequences
    • 142. > Encouraging Consequences through <ul><li>Being there helps </li></ul><ul><li>The receiver judges impact </li></ul><ul><li>Consistency counts </li></ul><ul><li>Variety counts </li></ul><ul><li>Combine short term and long term consequences </li></ul><ul><li>Use 4:1 ratio </li></ul><ul><li>Ask people what they like </li></ul><ul><li>Watch carefully to create a list of positive consequences </li></ul><ul><li>Teach others to praise </li></ul>
    • 143. Takeaways On Consequences <ul><li>There is a consequence for every single behavior </li></ul><ul><li>Consequences either encourage or discourage behavior </li></ul><ul><li>Encouragers for desired behaviors are the primary tool for unlocking discretionary performance in your organization </li></ul>
    • 144. Feedback and Coaching <ul><li>Feedback is information given to a person or group about their behavior, and its impact </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Positive </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>No feedback </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Constructive Feedback </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Coaching is working with an individual to build on the feedback to enhance performance </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Coach the person with objective feedback (use NORMS of Objectivity) </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Coach the person by sharing the effect of their actions </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Coach the person by demonstrating your desire to help not harm </li></ul></ul>Positive Feedback No Feedback ? Constructive Feedback Desired Behavior > Desired Behavior > Undesired Behavior < B E H AV I O R Executives rarely get feedback The tenure of an executive has never been shorter or more performance dependent Sustained levels of high performance within Organizations begin with the effectiveness Of executive leadership
    • 145. The Art & Science of Shaping <ul><li>Start with end goal in mind, know where individual is specifically at, develop meaningful intermediate steps to reach end goal </li></ul><ul><li>Size of behavioral steps matters </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Too big </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Too Small </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Just Right (Challenging & Realistic) </li></ul></ul>
    • 146. Takeaways about Shaping <ul><li>Shaping is the process of differentially encouraging successive approximations of behavior toward a goal </li></ul><ul><li>The first step in shaping is to carefully pinpoint the desired behavior and discuss it with the performer </li></ul><ul><li>Use your pinpointing skills to identify the behavioral steps between the current behavior and the desired behavior </li></ul><ul><li>Use ABC analysis to identify the antecedents and consequences required to influence the selected behaviors </li></ul><ul><li>Use your feedback and coaching skills to see every interaction as a shaping opportunity </li></ul><ul><li>Rely on the shaping opportunity grid </li></ul>Target Audience Opportunity Purpose Plan & Approach Who will be influenced through the contact Events available for use as shaping opportunities Business objectives, focus of encouragement Actions to take things to look for, how I will get information prior to contact
    • 147. Make-IT Model For Organizational Change Make It Real Pinpoint Critical Few Behaviors Make It Happen Activate & Consequate Desired Behavior Make It Clear Identify and Measure Target Results Make It Last Transfer Fluency to Sustain Behavior Its all about Outcomes Business Results Leadership Effectiveness Execution Culture
    • 148. Make It Clear <ul><li>The right business opportunity upon which to focus change </li></ul><ul><li>The right means for measuring progress for that opportunity </li></ul><ul><li>The right key performers to drive the change in the organization </li></ul><ul><li>And when they committed to the right leadership behaviors </li></ul>All members are aligned and agree Understand Your Corporate Culture & Consequence History
    • 149. Make it Real <ul><li>New results require new behaviors so the work in make it real is complete: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>All leaders confirm results they are targeting for improvement and they identify the Pinpoints for the right behaviors to make it happen </li></ul></ul><ul><li>This is where preparation happens for the right way to get the right behaviors </li></ul><ul><ul><li>It is key to go slow to go fast </li></ul></ul>Forget Supply-Push -- Create Demand - Pull
    • 150. Make It Happen <ul><li>Its all about implementation </li></ul><ul><li>Requires lots of coaching and feedback plus tracking of employee success </li></ul><ul><li>Requires active removal of barriers </li></ul><ul><li>It is not a delegation stage -- requires activate and consequate leadership behavior </li></ul><ul><li>A lot of leadership encouragement goes into making it happen </li></ul>Shape, Shape, Shape Behavior
    • 151. Make It Last <ul><li>Typically left out -- focuses on sustaining the change </li></ul><ul><li>Make sure HR practices are selecting for and evaluating new behaviors </li></ul><ul><li>Requires organizational systems realignment to ensure that processes and systems are consistent with the new vision/ways of working -- and are actively prompting and encouraging the new way. </li></ul>Align Consequence Systems
    • 152. The Stage-Gated Model Stage1 Gate Senior Leaders aligned on biz ops, target results, metrics? Stage 3 Gate Target results improving and positive cultural changes evident? Stage 2 Gate Ready to implement change? Stage 4 GateNew ways of working now business as usual? Make It Real Pinpoint Critical Few Behaviors Make It Happen Activate & Consequate Desired Behavior Make It Clear Identify and Measure Target Results Make It Last Transfer Fluency to Sustain Behavior Stage 1 Goal: Prioritize business opportunities Stage 2 Goal: Align organization to pinpointed behaviors & prepare leaders to execute Stage 3 Goal: Prompt and encourage new behaviors to achieve new results Stage 4 Goal:Integrate new behaviors into the routine business processes <ul><li>Key Leaders (and other sponsors supporting the change) understand Behavioral Science and the important role in coaching/supporting new behaviors </li></ul><ul><li>Senior Leaders aligned to business opportunities and targeted results </li></ul><ul><li>Other key leaders (as needed)aligned to business opportunities/change being implemented </li></ul><ul><li>Business opportunities prioritized by high ROI potential and fragility in implementation (requires focused effort for success). </li></ul><ul><li>All organizational levels aligned on key performers, pinpointed behaviors, targeted results </li></ul><ul><li>Next-level leaders and implementation field leaders prepared to support change </li></ul><ul><li>Results tracking systems operational to monitor successes & quickly respond to issues </li></ul><ul><li>Leaders at all levels prepared to coach/give feedback on new behaviors </li></ul><ul><li>Leadership teams approve detailed change implementation plan </li></ul><ul><li>Leadership teams (all levels) routinely using data to encourage change implementation & act on quick-fix areas </li></ul><ul><li>Evidence of desired leadership practices occurring, plus frequent feedback delivery (all levels) </li></ul><ul><li>Sustainability Plan developed </li></ul><ul><li>New ways of working integrated into organization’s management systems </li></ul><ul><li>Consequence systems aligned to consistently prompt & reinforce desired behaviors </li></ul>
    • 153. Make it Last - Build the IMPACT Culture Make It Clear Make It Clear Make It Clear Make It Clear Make It Real Make It Happen Teams & Individuals Organization Reviews & assessments (weekly, monthly, annually) Review behavior & results indicators Identify opps to improve Identify individuals to recognize & advance Execute plan For each biz opportunities, targeted results, critical path behaviors, key performers Prioritization & Resource Allocation Includes priorities for biz opps based in behavioral change Provides resources to support IMPACT methodology (coaching, training) Corporate goals & metrics released BU Planning Identify & prioritize biz opps due to planned behavior Corporate priorities announced Include corporate-wide leadership behaviors Make It Last
    • 154. Four Elements of DCOM* <ul><li>Direction - operationalization of vision, mission, and values that results in a clear focus, priorities, and the alignment of all employee group efforts </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Sense of purpose </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Values that have been behavioralized and are used to judge/evaluate manager’s decisions and actions </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Performance measurement system focused on how value is delivered to the customer </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Limited set of priorities, often one to three </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Competence -- the employee’s and organization’s abilities for managing and conducting work and work processes </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Necessary skills to collaborate with one another, plus economic literacy at all levels -- understanding the operating and financial leverage points of the organization </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Opportunity -- availability of resources such as technology, process design, time, finance, and empowerment </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Having the right level of authority to act, clear boundaries, and the ability to refine and adapt work processes to enable performers to operate more efficiently </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Motivation --leader’s use of consequences to create an environment where people “want to”, rather than “have to” perform at high levels </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Real Time data-based feedback to all performers </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Effective design and management of positive and negative consequences </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Align consequences of all systems not just with direction </li></ul></ul>* Developed by Dr. James Hillgren
    • 155. Hitting on all Four D C O M Results High Performance x Chaos x Bankruptcy x Frustration x Lethargy

    ×