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Cmmi and quality practices to support military operational readiness

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Every combat operational unit is a combination of individuals that have unique professions and individual capabilities. The unit capability to achieve its mission objectives in a given scenario is ...

Every combat operational unit is a combination of individuals that have unique professions and individual capabilities. The unit capability to achieve its mission objectives in a given scenario is fully depended on the sum of all individuals' individual performance capability and the timing of it.
Unit strategies and objectives set the step for performance excellence. However to achieve the desired operational results, we also need to give our people the tools, knowledge, and opportunities—pushing the opportunity for success down to our people.
One of the key ways that people performance excellence is through impacting their unit's procedures and combat doctrines. The ability to rapidly and continuously design, develop, and adapt your procedures and combat doctrines and targets in an agile and transparency to change and implement fashion is a huge advantage and includes:
• Management capability level from both professional and knowledge level
• Performance and reporting norms
• Self management and self discipline maintaining personal professional and knowledge capabilities
• Individual and team discipline
• Cooperation and knowledge and resource sharing
• Appropriate visibility of information, data and capabilities
• Quality of readiness and preparedness for performing mission
• Centralized resource management and appropriate utilization and usage of it
• Multidimensional management (future planning, unit strategy, short term objectives, the immediate objectives)
• Initiating, developing and implementation management of new tactics and technologies
• Balanced planning and deploying new tactics improvements and new technologies in a measured way that will quantify the improvement vs. expectations
• Information, data and communication security

Operational unit must develop and implement collaborative, transparent and repeatable combat doctrines that foster a culture of total performing and learning environment. Therefore writing new combat doctrine or tactics may turn out to be the easy part of the improve¬ment. This can be a very depressing thought to those who spend years in combat doctrine groups such as MOUT combat doctrine action teams or combat training facilities developing training materials.
Sometimes the “light at the end of the tunnel” seems to be publication of an inte¬grated set of descriptions of improved combat doctrines. However, once those combat doctrines are defined, documented, and even com¬mu¬nicated, much work remains.

In order for improvement to happen according to these new combat doctrine descrip-tions, each person working in the imple¬mentation organization will need to do the following

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    Cmmi and quality practices to support military operational readiness Cmmi and quality practices to support military operational readiness Presentation Transcript

    • CMMI-MilS Issues, Challenges, Opportunities Leveraging Operational Capabilities System Engineering Models Application to Intelligence and Operational Capabilities and Procedures2/10/2013 © 2008 K.V.P Consulting; CMMI-Mils Presentation Version 2.2 1
    • Knowledge Level and Set Expectations The presentation content assume that listeners have CMMI (DEV; ACQ and SVC), Value Stream Mapping, Six Sigma, Quality Function Deployment, LEAN, ISO 27000, REF,2/10/2013 © 2008 K.V.P Consulting; CMMI-Mils Presentation Version 2.2 2
    • Information Security and Classification Disclaimer Although it seems that the information in this presentation is reflecting actual and real operational information, plans and practices and therefore should be classified, it is not the case. All presentation initial materials are supported by internet sites and references that are accessible to all on public information base. © 2008 K.V.P Consulting; CMMI-Mils Presentation Version 2.2 32/10/2013
    • Intellectual Property Disclaimer •CMM and Capability Maturity Model are registered in the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office. •CMM Integration, CMMI, SCAMPI, and IDEAL are service marks of Carnegie Mellon University •Capability Maturity Model and CMM are registered trademarks in the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office. •CMM Integration, CMMI and IDEAL are service marks of Carnegie Mellon University. EFQM is a registered trademark of the European Foundation for Quality Management. EVA is a registered trademark of Stern Stewart & Company. •TSP -This work is sponsored by the U.S. Department of Defense. The Software Engineering Institute is a federally funded research and development center sponsored by the U.S. Department of Defense. • Copyright 2003 by Carnegie Mellon University. •PSP - This work is sponsored by the U.S. Department of Defense. The Software Engineering Institute is a federally funded research and development center sponsored by the U.S. Department of Defense. • Copyright 2005 Carnegie Mellon University. •ITIL® is a Registered Trade Mark, and a Registered Community Trade Mark of the Office of Government Commerce, and is Registered in the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office © 2008 K.V.P Consulting; CMMI-Mils Presentation Version 2.2 42/10/2013
    • Agenda 1 • Initiative background • The Operational Need • Working Assumptions • Challenge Statement • Conceptual Solution • Involved Methods2/10/2013 5 © 2008 K.V.P Consulting; CMMI-Mils Presentation Version 2.2
    • Agenda 2 • Industry Organization Typical Structure • Military Organization Structure • Initial Observation • CMMI-Mils • Structure • Process Institutionalization • Capability Level Definition • Maturity Level Definition • Generic Practices Definition • Process Area Content • Revised Definitions2/10/2013 6 © 2008 K.V.P Consulting; CMMI-Mils Presentation Version 2.2
    • Agenda 3 • Detailed Examples and Elaborations • Operational Units • Combat Support Units • Support Units • Intelligence and Special Forces units • Special Cases • High Maturity Concept in Military Service Orientation2/10/2013 7 © 2008 K.V.P Consulting; CMMI-Mils Presentation Version 2.2
    • Agenda 4 • Applying SCAMPI and Assessments to the Military Services • What we Looking For • Improvement Opportunities Suggestions • Current Status • Next Steps • About the Author • Contact2/10/2013 8 © 2008 K.V.P Consulting; CMMI-Mils Presentation Version 2.2
    • Agenda 1 • Initiative background • The Operational Need • Working Assumptions • Challenge Statement • History Background • Military • Industry • Conceptual Solution • Involved Methods2/10/2013 9 © 2008 K.V.P Consulting; CMMI-Mils Presentation Version 2.2
    • Initiative background • Every combat or security operational unit is a combination of individuals that have unique professions and individual capabilities. • The unit capability to achieve its mission objectives in a given scenario is fully depended on the sum of all individuals individual performance capability and the timing of it. • Unit strategies and objectives set the step for performance excellence. However to achieve the desired operational results, we also need to give our people the tools, and knowledge.2/10/2013 10 © 2008 K.V.P Consulting; CMMI-Mils Presentation Version 2.2
    • Initiative background • One of the key ways that people perform excellence is through impacting their units procedures and combat / operational doctrines. • The ability to rapidly and continuously design, develop, and adapt your procedures and combat doctrines and targets in an agile and transparency to change and implement fashion is a huge advantage to any unit or agency • Operational unit must develop and implement collaborative, transparent and repeatable combat doctrines that foster a culture of total performing and learning environment2/10/2013 11 © 2008 K.V.P Consulting; CMMI-Mils Presentation Version 2.2
    • Initiative background • Writing new combat doctrine or tactics may turn out to be the easy part of the improvement. This can be a very depressing thought to those who spend years in combat doctrine groups such as MOUT combat doctrine action teams or combat training facilities developing training materials. • Sometimes the “light at the end of the tunnel” seems to be publication of an integrated set of descriptions of improved combat doctrines. However, once those combat doctrines are defined, documented, and even communicated, much work remains.2/10/2013 12 © 2008 K.V.P Consulting; CMMI-Mils Presentation Version 2.2
    • Initiative background • Over the years I have discovered that if I will read models from the industry quality arena with a different mindset (military wise vs. businesslike) I will be able to suggest focus improvements and leveraging the overall operational (military) capability and mission execution efficiency2/10/2013 13 © 2008 K.V.P Consulting; CMMI-Mils Presentation Version 2.2
    • Agenda 1 • Initiative background • The Operational Need • Working Assumptions • Challenge Statement • History Background • Military • Industry • Conceptual Solution • Involved Methods2/10/2013 14 © 2008 K.V.P Consulting; CMMI-Mils Presentation Version 2.2
    • The Operational Need • Management capability level from both professional and knowledge level • Performance and reporting norms • Self management and self discipline maintaining personal professional and knowledge capabilities • Individual and team discipline • Cooperation and knowledge and resource sharing • Appropriate visibility of information, data and capabilities • Quality of readiness and preparedness for performing mission2/10/2013 15 © 2008 K.V.P Consulting; CMMI-Mils Presentation Version 2.2
    • The Operational Need • Centralized resource management and appropriate utilization and usage of it • Multidimensional management (future planning, unit strategy, short term objectives, the immediate objectives) • Initiating, developing and implementation management of new tactics and technologies • Balanced planning and deploying new tactics improvements and new technologies in a measured way that will quantify the improvement vs. expectations • Information, data and communication security2/10/2013 16 © 2008 K.V.P Consulting; CMMI-Mils Presentation Version 2.2
    • The Operational Need • Each person working in the implementation organization will need to do the following: • Access the combat doctrine descriptions • Understand all the combat doctrines at a top level • Understand in detail the combat doctrines that he or she performs • In addition, managers must do the following: • Understand all the combat doctrines at a top level • Understand the leadership combat doctrines change management in detail • Understand how to lead the unit using the new combat doctrines • Access historical measurement data for all combat doctrines versions performance • Support implementation of new combat doctrines in their own surroundings • Remove roadblocks to implementation2/10/2013 17 • © 2008 K.V.P Consulting; CMMI-Mils Presentation Version 2.2
    • The Operational Need • Many of these challenges were an is addressed on and ad-hoc basis, usually with specialized solutions or technologies that were limited to functional areas of the operational scenario or a unit that is currently in the frontline at a given time2/10/2013 18 © 2008 K.V.P Consulting; CMMI-Mils Presentation Version 2.2
    • The Operational Need A Focus Example From Targeting Area • We can list the operational needs in targets and targeting in the following list: • Mapping and classification of targets to operational priorities • Adjusting target (single) to operational achievement • Adjusting target life cycle time to attack timing • Adjusting ammunitions to target profile • Adjusting ammunitions elicitation to target profile and mission success objectives • Adjusting ammunitions to platforms • Determining the platforms accessibility to target and target life cycle time2/10/2013 19 © 2008 K.V.P Consulting; CMMI-Mils Presentation Version 2.2
    • The Operational Need Summary • Threat Complexity Understanding – High degree of uncertainty and ambiguity – Increased complexity of asymmetric threats • Direct Answer Competence – Focused, actionable intelligence and “eyes on target” – Ability to apply tailored combat power immediately, including Special Operations • Fast Reaction Capability – Tailorable, Scalable, & Modular Capabilities2/10/2013 20 © 2008 K.V.P Consulting; CMMI-Mils Presentation Version 2.2
    • Agenda 1 • Initiative background • The Operational Need • Working Assumptions • Challenge Statement • History Background • Military • Industry • Conceptual Solution • Involved Methods2/10/2013 21 © 2008 K.V.P Consulting; CMMI-Mils Presentation Version 2.2
    • Working Assumptions #1 • The ability to rapidly and continuously design, develop, and adapt your procedures and combat doctrines in an agile and transparency to change and implement fashion is a huge advantage and includes: • Management capability level from both professional and knowledge level • Performance and reporting norms • Self management and self discipline maintaining personal professional and knowledge capabilities • Individual and team discipline • Cooperation and knowledge and resource sharing • Appropriate visibility of information, data and capabilities • Quality of readiness and preparedness for performing mission2/10/2013 22 © 2008 K.V.P Consulting; CMMI-Mils Presentation Version 2.2
    • Working Assumptions • The ability to rapidly and continuously design, develop, and adapt your procedures and combat doctrines in an agile and transparency to change and implement fashion is a huge advantage and includes: • Centralized resource management and appropriate utilization and usage of it • Multidimensional management (future planning, unit strategy, short term objectives, the immediate objectives) • Initiating, developing and implementation management of new tactics and technologies • Balanced planning and deploying new tactics improvements and new technologies in a measured way that will quantify the improvement vs. expectations • Information, data and communication security2/10/2013 23 © 2008 K.V.P Consulting; CMMI-Mils Presentation Version 2.2
    • Working Assumptions • Military mission objective statement as much as other, must include quantitative objectives that are stated in a clear way • This will ensure that the executing force and its command will be able to quantify the achievements of objectives • This statement is even more significant when we deal with fire support units that prepare the battle field for the direct assault ground forces • A basic building block in battlefield management and evaluation is the commanding officer’s capability to accurately evaluate the fire support units effectiveness along with the efficiency of its resource usage. • Our objective in this presentation is to demonstrate that this fire support process complexity can be translated into simple multi- dimensional quantitative processes for resource planning and usage to improve the time required for achieving the mission statement2/10/2013 24 © 2008 K.V.P Consulting; CMMI-Mils Presentation Version 2.2
    • Working Assumptions • We need to provide the framework that will enable us to increase efficiency of development the operational (military) capabilities to cope with the following in a timely manner • High degree of Threat uncertainty and vagueness – Focused, actionable intelligence and “eyes on target” – Ability to apply tailored combat power immediately, including Special Operations – Tailorable, Scalable, & Modular Capabilities for a specific task or immediate ad-hoc need2/10/2013 25 © 2008 K.V.P Consulting; CMMI-Mils Presentation Version 2.2
    • Agenda 1 • Initiative background • The Operational Need • Working Assumptions • Challenge Statement • Conceptual Solution • Involved Methods2/10/2013 26 © 2008 K.V.P Consulting; CMMI-Mils Presentation Version 2.2
    • Professional Challenges (Partial list only) • Information analysis • Theater Structure Analysis • Target Position in Destination Environment • Enemy Value Chain • Operational System Value Chain • Weapons Power Elicitation2/10/2013 27 © 2008 K.V.P Consulting; CMMI-Mils Presentation Version 2.2
    • Operational Challenges (Partial list only) • Mission Objectives Definition in Quantitative Way and Structure • Definition of Good Enough Level • Differentiating Different Mission Objectives and Success Factors For the Different Battle Phases • Resource Usage and Adjustment Elicitation to Plan and Objectives2/10/2013 28 © 2008 K.V.P Consulting; CMMI-Mils Presentation Version 2.2
    • x DL x - - OPFOR & Self 2/10/2013 © 2008 K.V.P Consulting; CMMI-Mils Presentation 29 Version 2.2Development
    • Agenda 1 • Initiative background • The Operational Need • Working Assumptions • Challenge Statement • Conceptual Solution • Involved Methods • Background Definitions • Military • Industry • CMMI world2/10/2013 30 © 2008 K.V.P Consulting; CMMI-Mils Presentation Version 2.2
    • Conceptual Solution • During the intensive use with the SEI Models and practices and having our deep knowledge and long experience serving in armed forces. • We came to the conclusion and insight that appropriate application of Capability Maturity Model Integration (CMMI®)2 model specific practices (with a different content and context) and generic practices ("as is") evaluated by the SCAMPI MDD or ARC will bring a real improvement to the way that combat operational units evaluating themselves. •2/10/2013 31 © 2008 K.V.P Consulting; CMMI-Mils Presentation Version 2.2
    • Conceptual Solution • Moving a unit from the current environment of basic military disciplined way of thinking toward a more controlled and measured process can be overwhelming to those tasked to make it happen. • It is the premise of this presentation that SEI Models and practices and some other industry standards and methods can be used as tools to leverage these unit procedures to support the unit operational capability, readiness and preparedness for performing mission improvement. • It will provide you the basic information regarding the value added by using the standards to implement and define this application2/10/2013 32 © 2008 K.V.P Consulting; CMMI-Mils Presentation Version 2.2
    • Conceptual Solution • It is often hard to separate the details associated with mission description and objectives from the practices required to accomplish the effort. (see next slide) • We will try to share our ideas on coping with it2/10/2013 33 © 2008 K.V.P Consulting; CMMI-Mils Presentation Version 2.2
    • A Complex Effects-based Environment2/10/2013 © 2008 K.V.P Consulting; CMMI-Mils Presentation 34 Version 2.2
    • Agenda 1 • Initiative background • The Operational Need • Working Assumptions • Challenge Statement • History Background • Military • Industry • Conceptual Solution • Involved Methods2/10/2013 35 © 2008 K.V.P Consulting; CMMI-Mils Presentation Version 2.2
    • Involved Methods • S.E.I Models • Capability Maturity Model Integration (CMMI) is a process improvement approach that provides organizations with the essential elements of effective processes • CMMI-DEV - addresses product and service development processes • CMMI-ACQ - addresses supply chain management, acquisition, and outsourcing processes • CMMI-SVC - addresses guidance for delivering services within organization and to external customers • PSP - engineers with a disciplined personal framework for doing software work. The PSP process consists of a set of methods, forms, and scripts that show software engineers how to plan, measure, and manage their work • TSP - engineering teams in developing software-intensive products2/10/2013 36 © 2008 K.V.P Consulting; CMMI-Mils Presentation Version 2.2
    • Involved Methods • LEAN • Lean manufacturing or lean production, which is often known simply as "Lean", is the practice of a theory of production that considers the expenditure of resources for any means other than the creation of value for the presumed customer to be wasteful, and thus a target for elimination. In a more basic term, More value with less work.2/10/2013 37 © 2008 K.V.P Consulting; CMMI-Mils Presentation Version 2.2
    • Involved Methods • Quality function deployment (QFD) • QFD is described as a “method to transform user demands into design quality, to deploy the functions forming quality, and to deploy methods for achieving the design quality into subsystems and component parts, and ultimately to specific elements of the manufacturing process” • QFD is designed to help planners focus on characteristics of a new or existing product or service from the viewpoints of market segments, company, or technology-development needs • Value Stream Mapping • is a Lean technique used to analyze the flow of materials and information currently required to bring a product or service to a consumer. • Value Stream Mapping is commonly used in Lean environments to identify opportunities for improvement in lead time. • Implement the future state.2/10/2013 38 © 2008 K.V.P Consulting; CMMI-Mils Presentation Version 2.2
    • Involved Methods • 5S • 5S is a method for organizing a workplace, especially a shared workplace (like a shop floor or an office space), and keeping it organized. Its sometimes referred to as a housekeeping methodology, however this characterization can be misleading workplace goes beyond housekeeping (see discussion of "Seiton" below). • The 5Ss are: • Phase 1 - Seiri (整理) Sorting • Phase 2 - Seiton (整頓) Straighten or Set in Order • Phase 3 - Seisō (清掃) Sweeping or Shining • Phase 4 - Seiketsu (清潔) Standardizing • Phase 5 - Shitsuke (躾) Sustaining2/10/2013 39 © 2008 K.V.P Consulting; CMMI-Mils Presentation Version 2.2
    • Involved Methods • Bayesian Belief Network (BBN) • A Bayesian network (or a belief network) is a probabilistic graphical model that represents a set of variables and their probabilistic independencies. • Formally, Bayesian networks are directed acyclic graphs whose nodes represent variables, and whose arcs encode conditional independencies between the variables. Nodes can represent any kind of variable • Six Sigma • Six Sigma is a business management strategy, originally developed by Motorola, that today enjoys wide-spread application in many sectors of industry. • Six Sigma seeks to identify and remove the causes of defects and errors in manufacturing and business processes.2/10/2013 40 © 2008 K.V.P Consulting; CMMI-Mils Presentation Version 2.2
    • Involved Methods • Kaizen • Kaizen (Japanese for "continuous improvement") is a Japanese philosophy that focuses on continuous improvement throughout all aspects of life. When applied to the workplace, Kaizen activities continually improve all functions of a business, from manufacturing to management and from the CEO to the assembly line workers • ITIL • The Information Technology Infrastructure Library (ITIL) is a set of concepts and policies for managing information technology (IT) infrastructure, development and operations. • ITIL is published in a series of books, each of which cover an IT management topic. The names ITIL and IT Infrastructure Library are registered trademarks of the United Kingdoms Office of Government Commerce (OGC). ITIL gives a detailed description of a number of important IT practices with comprehensive check lists, tasks and procedures that can be tailored to any IT organization2/10/2013 41 © 2008 K.V.P Consulting; CMMI-Mils Presentation Version 2.2
    • Involved Methods • ISO/IEC 20000 is the first international standard for IT Service Management. It is based on and is intended to supersede the earlier British Standard, BS 15000. • Formally: ISO 20000-1 (part 1) "promotes the adoption of an integrated process approach to effectively deliver managed services to meet the business and customer requirements". It comprises ten sections: Scope; Terms & Definitions ; Planning and Implementing Service Management ; Requirements for a Management System ; Planning & Implementing New or Changed Services ; Service Delivery Process ; Relationship Processes ; Control Processes ; Resolution Processes ; Release Process. • ISO 20000-2 (part 2) is a code of practice, and describes the best practices for service management within the scope of ISO20000-1. It comprises the same sections as part 1 but excludes the Requirements for a Management system as no requirements are imposed by part 2‘.2/10/2013 42 © 2008 K.V.P Consulting; CMMI-Mils Presentation Version 2.2
    • Involved Methods • PMBOK • The Project Management Institute (PMI) published the first A Guide to the Project Management Body of Knowledge (PMBOK Guide) • OPM3 • Organizational Project Management Maturity Model (OPM3®) It provides requirements for assessing and developing or improving capabilities in project, program, and portfolio management2/10/2013 43 © 2008 K.V.P Consulting; CMMI-Mils Presentation Version 2.2
    • Agenda 2 • Industry Organization Typical Structure • Military Organization Structure • Initial Observation • CMMI-Mils • Structure • Capability Level Definition • Maturity Level Definition • Generic Practices Definition • Process Area Content • Revised Definitions2/10/2013 44 © 2008 K.V.P Consulting; CMMI-Mils Presentation Version 2.2
    • Industry Organization Typical Structure2/10/2013 © 2008 K.V.P Consulting; CMMI-Mils Presentation Version 2.2 45
    • Organizational Structure2/10/2013 © 2008 K.V.P Consulting; CMMI-Mils Presentation 46 Version 2.2
    • Matrix Structure2/10/2013 © 2008 K.V.P Consulting; CMMI-Mils Presentation 47 Version 2.2
    • Agenda 2 • Industry Organization Typical Structure • Military Organization Structure • Initial Observation • CMMI-Mils • Structure • Capability Level Definition • Maturity Level Definition • Generic Practices Definition • Process Area Content • Revised Definitions2/10/2013 48 © 2008 K.V.P Consulting; CMMI-Mils Presentation Version 2.2
    • Military Organization Structure • The source presentations for this section can be found at: • Soldier • Infantry Team / Mechanized Teams • Squad • Platoon • Company • Battalion • Brigade • Divisions • Corps • Field army • Army group • Types of Branches2/10/2013 49 © 2008 K.V.P Consulting; CMMI-Mils Presentation Version 2.2
    • Divisions -Each Division has - combat entities - combat service -combat service support units - graphic symbol (two Xs) XX Division Division Cav (Recon) Signal Field Artillery Division Chemical Troops Military Police Intelligence Logistics Aviation Support Engineers Mechanized Armor Brigade Armor Brigade Brigade2/10/2013 © 2008 K.V.P Consulting; CMMI-Mils Presentation 50 Version 2.2
    • Corps - A Corps (pronounced /ˈkɔər/ "core"; from the Latin corpus "body") is either a large formation, or an administrative grouping of troops within an armed force with a common function such as Artillery or Signals representing an arm of service. Corps may also refer to a branch of service such as the United States Marine Corps, the Corps of Royal Marines - graphic symbol (three Xs)2/10/2013 © 2008 K.V.P Consulting; CMMI-Mils Presentation 51 Version 2.2
    • Army group An army group is a military organization consisting of several field armies, which is self-sufficient for indefinite periods. It is usually responsible for a particular geographic area. An army group is the largest field organization handled by a single commander usually a full General or Field Marshal and it generally includes between 400,000 and 1,500,000 troops - graphic symbol (five Xs) XXXXX2/10/2013 © 2008 K.V.P Consulting; CMMI-Mils Presentation 52 Version 2.2
    • Types of Branches 1) Combat Arms: involved in actual fighting 2) Combat Support: provide operational assistance to combat arms to include combat missions as necessary 3) Combat Service Support: provide logistical and administrative support to the army; personnel normally not directly involved in combat operations2/10/2013 © 2008 K.V.P Consulting; CMMI-Mils Presentation 53 Version 2.2
    • Agenda 2 • Industry Organization Typical Structure • Military Organization Structure • Initial Observation • CMMI-Mils • Structure • Capability Level Definition • Maturity Level Definition • Generic Practices Definition • Process Area Content • Revised Definitions2/10/2013 54 © 2008 K.V.P Consulting; CMMI-Mils Presentation Version 2.2
    • 2/10/2013 © 2008 K.V.P Consulting; CMMI-Mils Presentation 55 Version 2.2
    • Initial Observation • Little integration between unit • Task over process vs. process-driven • Sporadic interagency coordination • Immature analysis techniques • Prescription vs. guidance • Operational ‘networks and task forces’ (levels are archaic) • Knowledge and technology • Culture • Doctrine vs. concepts • Complexity + complicatedness = confusion…2/10/2013 56 © 2008 K.V.P Consulting; CMMI-Mils Presentation Version 2.2
    • Agenda 2 • Industry Organization Typical Structure • Military Organization Structure • Initial Observation • CMMI-Mils • Structure • Capability Level Definition • Maturity Level Definition • Generic Practices Definition • Process Area Content • Revised Definitions2/10/2013 57 © 2008 K.V.P Consulting; CMMI-Mils Presentation Version 2.2
    • CMMI-Mils2/10/2013 © 2008 K.V.P Consulting; CMMI-Mils Presentation Version 2.2 58
    • Agenda 2 • Industry Organization Typical Structure • Military Organization Structure • Initial Observation • CMMI-Mils • Structure • Process Institutionalization • Capability Level Definition • Maturity Level Definition • Generic Practices Definition • Process Area Content2/10/2013 • Revised Definitions 59 © 2008 K.V.P Consulting; CMMI-Mils Presentation Version 2.2
    • High Level Structure • CMMI-MilS is a comprehensive model that is covering all aspects of the military and security organizations • It is true that the model start point is the single soldier; however the best benefit from the implementation starts at • Brigade and division level in ‘pure’ military operations • Battalion and brigade in peace keeping operations (it also depends in the task and objectives statements) • Special and intelligence operations – at the appropriate level • Security, law enforcement and emergency organizations – at the appropriate level2/10/2013 60 © 2008 K.V.P Consulting; CMMI-Mils Presentation Version 2.2
    • High Level Structure • The CMMI-MilS make use of all CMMI’s PAs including PSP and TSP as the core Body of Knowledge. This is the reason that we have divided it to different volumes: • Volumes #1 - Universal Process Areas - this collection of process areas and practices address the Unit & Theater Management needs • Volumes #2 - Combat Process Areas - this collection of process areas and practices address the requirements to develop and maintain appropriate Combat Capabilities • Volumes #3 - Combat Support Capabilities - this collection of process areas and practices address the requirements to develop and maintain appropriate Combat Support Capabilities with full alignment with the mission objectives and goals2/10/2013 61 © 2008 K.V.P Consulting; CMMI-Mils Presentation Version 2.2
    • High Level Structure • The CMMI-MilS make use of all CMMI’s PAs including PSP and TSP as the core Body of Knowledge. This is the reason that we have divided it to different volumes: • Volumes #4 - Combat Service Support Capabilities - this collection of process areas and practices address the requirements to develop and maintain appropriate Combat Service Support Capabilities with full alignment with the mission objectives and goals • Volumes #5 - Force Building Processes - this collection of process areas and practices address the requirements to develop and maintain appropriate and efficient procedures and tactics to enable effective force building that will answer the operational need from the current threat to the future2/10/2013 62 © 2008 K.V.P Consulting; CMMI-Mils Presentation Version 2.2
    • CMMI Originals to CMMI-MilS Cross Reference Table #1CMMI Originals CMMI-MilS CMMI Originals CMMI-MilSCausal Analysis and Causal Analysis and Resolution Organizational Process Arms & Unit Process DefinitionResolution (CAR) (CAR) Definition (OPD) (AUPD)Configuration Management Configuration Management (CM) Organizational Process Arms & Unit Process Focus(CM) Focus (OPF) (AUPF)Decision Analysis and Decision Analysis and Resolution Organizational Process Unit Process Performance (UPP)Resolution (DAR) (DAR) Performance (OPP)Project Planning (PP) Mission Planning (MP) Organizational Training Arms & Unit Training (AUT) (OT)Project Monitoring and Mission Monitoring and Control Process and Product Process and Mission QualityControl (PMC) (MMC) Quality Assurance (PPQA) Assurance (PMQA)Integrated Project Joint Mission Management (JMM) Quantitative Project Quantitative MissionManagement (IPM) Management (QPM) Management (QMM)Measurement and Analysis Measurement and Analysis (MA) Requirements Management Objectives & Gals Management(MA) (REQM) (OGM)Organizational Innovation and Tactical & Operational Innovation Risk Management (RSKM) Risk Management (RSKM)Deployment (OID) and Deployment (TOID) 2/10/2013 63 © 2008 K.V.P Consulting; CMMI-Mils Presentation Version 2.2
    • CMMI Originals to CMMI-MilS Cross Reference Table #2CMMI-SVC Originals CMMI-MilS CMMI –DEV Originals CMMI-MilSCapacity and Availability Capacity and Availability Product Integration (PI) Joint Missions IntegrationManagement (CAM) Management (CAM) (JMI)Incident Resolution and Incident Resolution and Prevention Requirements Development (RD) Objectives & GalsPrevention (IRP) (IRP) Development (OGD)Service Continuity (SCON) Service Continuity (SCON) Supplier Agreement Management (SAM)Service Delivery (SD) Service Delivery (SD) Technical Solution (TS) Tactical & Operational Solution Development (TOSD)Service System Development Service System Development(SSD) (SSD) Validation (VAL) Validation (VAL)Strategic Service Management Strategic Service Management Verification (VER) Verification (VER)(STSM) (STSM)Service System Transition Service System Transition (SST) CMMI-ACQ Originals CMMI-MilS(SST) Agreement Management Combat Support Management (AM) (CSM) Acquisition Technical Combat Support Technical Management (ATM) Management (CSTM) 2/10/2013 Solicitation and Supplier Solicitation and Support 64 © 2008 K.V.P Consulting; CMMI-Mils PresentationAgreement Development Version 2.2 Agreement Development (SSAD) (SSAD)
    • Structure – Process AreasVolumes #1 - Universal Process Volumes #2 - Combat Volumes #3 - Combat Volumes #4 - Combat Service Volumes #5 – ForceAreas - Unit & Theater Process Areas Support Capabilities Support Capabilities Building ProcessesManagement1. Causal Analysis and 1. Joint Mission 1. Combat Support 1. Capacity and Availability 1. Arms & Unit Resolution (CAR) Management (JMM) Management (CSM) Management (CAM) Process Definition2. Configuration Management 2. Joint Missions 2. Combat Support 2. Incident Resolution and (AUPD) (CM) Integration (JMI) Technical Management Prevention (IRP) 2. Arms & Unit3. Decision Analysis and 3. Tactical & (CSTM) 3. Service Continuity (SCON) Process Focus Resolution (DAR) Operational Solution 3. Solicitation and Support 4. Service Delivery (SD) (AUPF)4. Mission Planning (MP) Development Agreement 5. Service System Development 3. Unit Process5. Mission Monitoring and (TOSD) Development (SSAD) (SSD) Performance Control (MMC) 4. Validation (VAL) 6. Strategic Service (UPP)6. Measurement and Analysis 5. Verification (VER) Management (STSM) 4. Arms & Unit (MA) 7. Service System Transition Training (AUT)7. Tactical & Operational (SST) Innovation and Deployment (TOID)8. Process and Mission Quality Assurance (PMQA)9. Quantitative Mission Management (QMM)10. Objectives & Gals Management (OGM)11. Risk Management (RSKM)12. Objectives & Gals Development (OGD) Red highlighted Pas are in use in more than one PA with elaborations to others 2/10/2013 65 © 2008 K.V.P Consulting; CMMI-Mils Presentation Version 2.2
    • Structure – Maturity Levels (Partial List) Maturity Level 1: Maturity Level 2: Maturity Level 3: Maturity Level 4: Maturity Level 5: Initial Managed Defined Quantitatively Optimizing Managed Configuration Decision Analysis and Quantitative Mission Causal Analysis and Management (CM) Resolution (DAR) Management (QMM) Resolution (CAR) Mission Planning Risk Management Unit Process Tactical & (MP) (RSKM) Performance (UPP) Operational Mission Monitoring Joint Mission Innovation and and Control (MMC) Management (JMM) Deployment (TOID) Measurement and Joint Missions Analysis (MA) Integration (JMI) Process and Mission Arms & Unit Process Quality Assurance Definition (AUPD) (PMQA) Arms & Unit Process Objectives & Gals Focus (AUPF) Management (OGM) Arms & Unit Training Objectives & Gals (AUT) Development (OGD) Tactical & Operational Solution Development (TOSD) Validation (VAL) Verification (VER) Red highlighted Pas are in use in more than one PA with elaborations to others2/10/2013 66 © 2008 K.V.P Consulting; CMMI-Mils Presentation Version 2.2
    • Agenda 2 • Industry Organization Typical Structure • Military Organization Structure • Initial Observation • CMMI-Mils • Structure • Process Institutionalization • Capability Level Definition • Maturity Level Definition • Generic Practices Definition • Process Area Content2/10/2013 • Revised Definitions 67 © 2008 K.V.P Consulting; CMMI-Mils Presentation Version 2.2
    • Process Institutionalization • Institutionalization is an important concept in process improvement. When mentioned in the generic goal and generic practice descriptions, institutionalization implies that the process is ingrained in the way the work is performed and there is commitment and consistency to performing the process. • An institutionalized process is more likely to be retained during times of stress. When the requirements and objectives for the process change, however, the implementation of the process may also need to change to ensure that it remains effective. The generic practices describe activities that address these aspects of institutionalization.2/10/2013 68 © 2008 K.V.P Consulting; CMMI-Mils Presentation Version 2.2
    • Agenda 2 • Industry Organization Typical Structure • Military Organization Structure • Initial Observation • CMMI-Mils • Structure • Process Institutionalization • Capability Level Definition • Maturity Level Definition • Generic Practices Definition • Process Area Content2/10/2013 • Revised Definitions 69 © 2008 K.V.P Consulting; CMMI-Mils Presentation Version 2.2
    • Capability Level Definition • Capability Level 0: Incomplete • Capability Level 1: Performed • Capability Level 2: Managed • Capability Level 3: Defined • Capability Level 4: Quantitatively Managed • Capability Level 5: Optimizing2/10/2013 70 © 2008 K.V.P Consulting; CMMI-Mils Presentation Version 2.2
    • Capability Level 1: Performed • A capability level 1 process is characterized as a “performed process.” A performed process is a process that satisfies the specific goals of the process area. It supports and enables the steps needed to achieve the task goals and objectives. • Although capability level 1 results in important improvements, those improvements can be lost over time if they are not institutionalized. The application of institutionalization (the CMMI generic practices at capability levels 2 through 5) helps to ensure that improvements are maintained2/10/2013 71 © 2008 K.V.P Consulting; CMMI-Mils Presentation Version 2.2
    • Agenda 2 • Industry Organization Typical Structure • Military Organization Structure • Initial Observation • CMMI-Mils • Structure • Process Institutionalization • Capability Level Definition • Maturity Level Definition • Generic Practices Definition • Process Area Content2/10/2013 • Revised Definitions 72 © 2008 K.V.P Consulting; CMMI-Mils Presentation Version 2.2
    • Maturity Level Definition • Maturity Level 1: Initial • Maturity Level 2: Managed • Maturity Level 3: Defined • Capability Level 3: Defined • Maturity Level 4: Quantitatively Managed • Maturity Level 5: Optimizing2/10/2013 73 © 2008 K.V.P Consulting; CMMI-Mils Presentation Version 2.2
    • Maturity Level 2: Managed • At maturity level 2, the Arms and Units (functional units) of the ‘mother’ units have ensured that processes are planned and executed in accordance with policy; the unit members are skilled people who have adequate resources to perform controlled outputs; involve relevant stakeholders; are monitored, controlled, and reviewed; and are evaluated for adherence to their process descriptions. The process discipline reflected by maturity level 2 helps to ensure that existing practices are retained during times of stress. When these practices are in place, units are performed and managed according to their documented plans.2/10/2013 74 © 2008 K.V.P Consulting; CMMI-Mils Presentation Version 2.2
    • Agenda 2 • Industry Organization Typical Structure • Military Organization Structure • Initial Observation • CMMI-Mils • Structure • Process Institutionalization • Capability Level Definition • Maturity Level Definition • Generic Practices Definition • Process Area Content2/10/2013 • Revised Definitions 75 © 2008 K.V.P Consulting; CMMI-Mils Presentation Version 2.2
    • Generic Practices Definition • GP 1.1 Perform Specific Practices • GP 2.1 Establish an Organizational Policy • GP 2.2 Plan the Process • GP 2.3 Provide Resources • GP 2.4 Assign Responsibility • GP 2.5 Train People • GP 2.6 Manage Configurations • GP 2.7 Identify and Involve Relevant Stakeholders • GP 2.8 Monitor and Control the Process • GP 2.9 Objectively Evaluate Adherence • GP 2.10 Review Status with Higher Level Management • GP 3.1 Establish a Defined Process • GP 3.2 Collect Improvement Information • GP 4.1 Establish Quantitative Objectives for the Process • GP 4.2 Stabilize Subprocess Performance • GP 5.1 Ensure Continuous Process Improvement • GP 5.2 Correct Root Causes of Problems2/10/2013 76 © 2008 K.V.P Consulting; CMMI-Mils Presentation Version 2.2
    • GP 2.6 Manage Configurations • Place designated work products of the process under appropriate levels of control. • The purpose of this generic practice is to establish and maintain the integrity of the process designated elements (or their descriptions) throughout their useful life. • The designated work products are specifically identified in the plan for performing the process, along with a specification of the appropriate level of control. • Different levels of control are appropriate for different work products and for different points in time2/10/2013 77 © 2008 K.V.P Consulting; CMMI-Mils Presentation Version 2.2
    • Agenda 2 • Industry Organization Typical Structure • Military Organization Structure • Initial Observation • CMMI-Mils • Structure • Process Institutionalization • Capability Level Definition • Maturity Level Definition • Generic Practices Definition • Process Area Content2/10/2013 • Revised Definitions 78 © 2008 K.V.P Consulting; CMMI-Mils Presentation Version 2.2
    • Process Area Content2/10/2013 © 2008 K.V.P Consulting; CMMI-Mils Presentation Version 2.2 79
    • Core Process Area • Causal Analysis and Resolution (CAR) • Configuration Management (CM) • Decision Analysis and Resolution (DAR) • Mission Planning (MP) • Mission Monitoring and Control (MMC) • Joint Mission Management (JMM) • Measurement and Analysis (MA) • Tactical & Operational Innovation and Deployment (TOID) • Arms & Unit Process Definition (AUPD) • Arms & Unit Process Focus (AUPF) • Unit Process Performance (UPP) • Arms & Unit Training (AUT) • Process and Mission Quality Assurance (PMQA) • Quantitative Mission Management (QMM) • Objectives & Gals Management (OGM) • Risk Management (RSKM)2/10/2013 80 © 2008 K.V.P Consulting; CMMI-Mils Presentation Version 2.2
    • Configuration Management (CM) A Unit & Theater Management PA at Maturity Level 2 • The purpose of Configuration Management (CM) is to establish and maintain the integrity of mission elements and related units using configuration identification, configuration control, configuration status accounting, and configuration audits2/10/2013 81 © 2008 K.V.P Consulting; CMMI-Mils Presentation Version 2.2
    • Mission Planning (MP) A Unit & Theater Management PA at Maturity Level 2 • The purpose of Mission Planning (MP) is to establish and maintain plans that define mission activities2/10/2013 82 © 2008 K.V.P Consulting; CMMI-Mils Presentation Version 2.2
    • Agenda 2 • Industry Organization Typical Structure • Military Organization Structure • Initial Observation • CMMI-Mils • Structure • Process Institutionalization • Capability Level Definition • Maturity Level Definition • Generic Practices Definition • Process Area Content2/10/2013 • Revised Definitions 83 © 2008 K.V.P Consulting; CMMI-Mils Presentation Version 2.2
    • Some of the CMMI-MilS Revised Definitions • Acceptance Criteria • Organizational Process Assets • Achievement Profile • Performance Parameters • Acquisition • Process Improvement • Allocated Requirement • Process Performance • Appropriate • Process Tailoring • As Needed • Quality • Baseline • Quality and Process-performance • Bidirectional Traceability Objectives • Capability Evaluation • Quantitative Objective • Capability Level • Quantitatively Managed Process • Capable Process • Shared Vision • CMMI Framework • Special Cause Of Process Variation • Defined Process • Stable Process • Discipline • Statistical Predictability • Lifecycle Model • Statistically Managed Process • Nondevelopmental Item (NDI) • Tailoring • Operational Concept • Technical Data Package • Operational Scenario • Validation • Organizational Policy • Verification2/10/2013 84 © 2008 K.V.P Consulting; CMMI-Mils Presentation Version 2.2
    • CMMI Definitions • Tailoring • Tailoring a process makes, alters, or adapts the process description for a particular end. For example, a task force establishes its defined process by tailoring from the command set of standard processes to meet the objectives, constraints, and environment of the mission as described in the mission profile • Tailoring Guidelines • Organizational guidelines that enable unit, teams, and functional units to appropriately adapt standard processes for their use. The command’s set of standard processes is described as a general level that may not be directly usable to perform a process. • Tailoring guidelines aid those who establish the defined processes for units. Tailoring guidelines cover (1) selecting a standard process, (2) selecting an appropriate mission profile, and (3) tailoring the selected standard process and profile to fit unit / mission needs. Tailoring guidelines describe what can and cannot be modified and identify process components that are candidates for modification.2/10/2013 85 © 2008 K.V.P Consulting; CMMI-Mils Presentation Version 2.2
    • Agenda 3 • Detailed Examples and Elaborations • Operational Units • Combat Support Units • Support Units • Intelligence and Special Forces units • Special Cases • High Maturity Concept in Military Service Orientation2/10/2013 86 © 2008 K.V.P Consulting; CMMI-Mils Presentation Version 2.2
    • Detailed Examples and Elaborations2/10/2013 © 2008 K.V.P Consulting; CMMI-Mils Presentation Version 2.2 87
    • Agenda 3 • Detailed Examples and Elaborations • Operational Units • Combat Support Units • Support Units • Intelligence and Special Forces units • Special Cases • High Maturity Concept in Military Service Orientation2/10/2013 88 © 2008 K.V.P Consulting; CMMI-Mils Presentation Version 2.2
    • Operational Units • We will watch a short clips and will discuss: • Understanding operational environment • Understanding operational requirements • Military concept for configuration item • Tactical estimations and replanning2/10/2013 89 © 2008 K.V.P Consulting; CMMI-Mils Presentation Version 2.2
    • Military concept for configuration Squad Leader Weapons SGT Combat Medic Advanced Marksman Fire Team Leader Automatic Rifleman Grenadier Rifleman2/10/2013 © 2008 K.V.P Consulting; CMMI-Mils Presentation 90 Version 2.2
    • Military concept for configuration2/10/2013 © 2008 K.V.P Consulting; CMMI-Mils Presentation 91 Version 2.2
    • Agenda 3 • Detailed Examples and Elaborations • Operational Units • Combat Support Units • Support Units • Intelligence and Special Forces units • Special Cases • High Maturity Concept in Military Service Orientation2/10/2013 92 © 2008 K.V.P Consulting; CMMI-Mils Presentation Version 2.2
    • Combat Support Units • We can list the operational needs from Combat Support Units (in this case = Fire Support) in targets and targeting in the following list: • Mapping and classification of targets to operational priorities • Adjusting target (single) to operational achievement • Adjusting target life cycle time to attack timing • Adjusting ammunitions to target profile • Adjusting ammunitions elicitation to target profile and mission success objectives • Adjusting ammunitions to platforms • Determining the platforms accessibility to target and target life cycle time2/10/2013 93 © 2008 K.V.P Consulting; CMMI-Mils Presentation Version 2.2
    • Agenda 3 • Detailed Examples and Elaborations • Operational Units • Combat Support Units • Support Units • Intelligence and Special Forces units • Special Cases • High Maturity Concept in Military Service Orientation2/10/2013 94 © 2008 K.V.P Consulting; CMMI-Mils Presentation Version 2.2
    • Support Units Approaches to Military Combat Services Support • Mass- Inventory = Days of Supply • More is better • Equipment measured in days of supply • Uses massive inventory to cope with uncertainty in demand and supply • On Time Supply = Flow Time • On-time is better • Inventory is reduced to a minimum and kept moving • Uses demand prediction and static optimization to purge uncertainty • Works great, except when it doesn’t = Battlefield uncertainty • Monitor and Respond = Speed / Quality of Effect • Adaptive is better • Inventory is dynamically positioned • Uses transportation flexibility to handle uncertainty2/10/2013 95 © 2008 K.V.P Consulting; CMMI-Mils Presentation Version 2.2
    • Military Combat Services Support Challenges in the Battlefield Center of Gravity ?2/10/2013 © 2008 K.V.P Consulting; CMMI-Mils Presentation 96 Version 2.2
    • Support Units and VSM • SUN TZU - lived c. 544—496 BC - THE Art of War • We may take it then that an army without its baggage-train is lost; without provisions it is lost; without bases of supply it is lost • Make forays in fertile country in order to supply your army with food • The skillful soldier does not raise a second levy, neither are his supply wagons loaded more than twice • Bring war material with you from home, but forage on the enemy. Thus the army will have food enough for its needs2/10/2013 97 © 2008 K.V.P Consulting; CMMI-Mils Presentation Version 2.2
    • Agenda 3 • Detailed Examples and Elaborations • Operational Units • Combat Support Units • Support Units • Intelligence and Special Forces units • Special Cases • High Maturity Concept in Military Service Orientation2/10/2013 98 © 2008 K.V.P Consulting; CMMI-Mils Presentation Version 2.2
    • Intelligence and Special Forces units • We will discuss: • Understanding Special Forces operational need • Special Forces for configuration item • Intelligence for configuration item • Intelligence Traceability • Mission estimations and replanning2/10/2013 99 © 2008 K.V.P Consulting; CMMI-Mils Presentation Version 2.2
    • Understanding Special Forces operational need and Intelligence Traceability2/10/2013 © 2008 K.V.P Consulting; CMMI-Mils Presentation 100 Version 2.2
    • Special Forces for configuration item2/10/2013 © 2008 K.V.P Consulting; CMMI-Mils Presentation 101 Version 2.2
    • Intelligence for configuration item2/10/2013 © 2008 K.V.P Consulting; CMMI-Mils Presentation 102 Version 2.2
    • Mission estimations and replanning2/10/2013 © 2008 K.V.P Consulting; CMMI-Mils Presentation 103 Version 2.2
    • Agenda 3 • Detailed Examples and Elaborations • Operational Units • Combat Support Units • Support Units • Intelligence and Special Forces units • Special Cases • High Maturity Concept in Military Service Orientation2/10/2013 104 © 2008 K.V.P Consulting; CMMI-Mils Presentation Version 2.2
    • Special Cases • We will Discuss • Law Enforcement (Police) • Traffic Control VSM • On traffic control – travel time vs. activity time vs. results and input • Information Traceability • Between domains; operational needs and operational needs and capabilities • Emergency Agencies • Operational Scenarios • Security Agencies • Configuration Management • Information Traceability2/10/2013 105 © 2008 K.V.P Consulting; CMMI-Mils Presentation Version 2.2
    • Agenda 3 • Detailed Examples and Elaborations • Operational Units • Combat Support Units • Support Units • Intelligence and Special Forces units • Special Cases • High Maturity Concept in Military Service Orientation2/10/2013 106 © 2008 K.V.P Consulting; CMMI-Mils Presentation Version 2.2
    • High Maturity Concept in Military Service Orientation How to use Bayesian Networks2/10/2013 © 2008 K.V.P Consulting; CMMI-Mils Presentation Version 2.2 107
    • Conceptual Planning, Execution and Operation of Combat Fire Support Effectiveness A Thinking Model with Practical Measurements © 2008 K.V.P Consulting; CMMI-Mils Presentation Version 2.2 1082/10/2013
    • Presentation Background • Recently I Was Asked To Evaluate the Fire Support Process • The process evaluation was conducted at different levels (vertical and horizontal) including the use of the following tools: Game Theory; Quality Function Deployment; Bayesian Networks and process flow simulation in the different domains • We used elements from the SEI SCAMPI method to perform this evaluation • This presentation is a brief summery of the process elements that we were able to identify and the building parameters for its performance measurements2/10/2013 109 © 2008 K.V.P Consulting; CMMI-Mils Presentation Version 2.2
    • Presentation Operational Idea • Military mission objective statement as much as other, must include quantitative objectives that are stated in a clear way • This will ensure that the executing force and its command will be able to quantify the achievements of objectives • This statement is even more significant when we deal with fire support units that prepare the battle field for the direct assault ground forces • A basic building block in battlefield management and evaluation is the commanding officer’s capability to accurately evaluate the fire support units effectiveness along with the efficiency of its resource usage. • Our objective in this presentation is to demonstrate that this fire support process complexity can be translated into simple multi- dimensional quantitative processes for resource planning and usage to improve the time required for achieving the mission statement2/10/2013 110 © 2008 K.V.P Consulting; CMMI-Mils Presentation Version 2.2
    • Main Challenges • Fire elicitation to achieve mission statements • Operating fire support in the appropriate timing • Targets planning • Planning and developing the fire support array • Enemy status evaluation and comparing it to the mission objectives • End to End attack lane (process simulation) from target definition and acquiring to ammunition availability and logistic considerations • Developing the support plan; such as acquisition planning; warfare R&D; adjusting ammunition to scenario and scenario simulations and testing2/10/2013 111 © 2008 K.V.P Consulting; CMMI-Mils Presentation Version 2.2
    • MissionObjectives Visualization of the Targets World 18 Destruction Un Known 12 Delay Neutralize Fix 6 Suppression 5 120 20 2/10/2013 112 ©Type BK.V.P Consulting; CMMI-Mils Presentation Version 2.2 2008 Type A Type B Type C Type D Type E Type F Targets
    • The Solution Challenge © 2008 K.V.P Consulting; CMMI-Mils Presentation Version 2.2 1132/10/2013
    • Professional Challenges (Partial list only) • Information analysis • Target Structure Analysis • Target Position in Destination Environment • Target Value Chain • Operational System Value Chain • Weapons Elicitation to Target Type and Classification2/10/2013 114 © 2008 K.V.P Consulting; CMMI-Mils Presentation Version 2.2
    • Operational Challenges (Partial list only) • Mission Objectives Definition in Quantitative Way and Structure • Definition of Good Enough Level • Differentiating Different Mission Objectives and Success Factors For the Different Battle Phases • Resource Usage and Adjustment Elicitation to Plan and Objectives2/10/2013 115 © 2008 K.V.P Consulting; CMMI-Mils Presentation Version 2.2
    • Core Scenarios for Conceptual Demonstration (Partial list only) • Scenario A – all resources are available – target will be hit on time with the relevant ammunition on the appropriate platform and the mission objective will be achieved • Scenario B – an alternate ammunition (secondary in compliance to target profile) on compromised platform • Scenario C – unknown probability to achieve the mission objective successfully due to delay in attack • Scenario D – analysis of the best mission objective with the considerations of the success of it and its impact on the theater behavior2/10/2013 116 © 2008 K.V.P Consulting; CMMI-Mils Presentation Version 2.2
    • The Thinking Model Conceptual Thinking Approach to Solve This Challenge © 2008 K.V.P Consulting; CMMI-Mils Presentation Version 2.2 1172/10/2013
    • Solution Approach Background • From our description till now, we can see that fire support planning, execution and control processes to achieve quantitative objectives that support mission objectives are highly complicated • We can split this complexity into two main vectors • Planning world that is a combination of multi functional teams and groups that in most cases are located in different locations and units organizations • Every core planning parameter (entity) in this world is assembled from two-dimension (and in most cases from more than two). Each of the core entities will have at least impact or effect on additional two or more entities • The given collection of planning parameters creates a planning process that must consider multi-dimension relationships and impacts between core entities and their building blocks as well as on the decisions to be made2/10/2013 118 © 2008 K.V.P Consulting; CMMI-Mils Presentation Version 2.2
    • Solution Approach Background - 2 • This complexity of relationships and internal and external weights brought us to adopt the Bayesian network (or a belief network) approach • Bayesian networks are directed acyclic graphs whose nodes represent variables, and whose arcs encode conditional independencies between the variables. • Nodes can represent any kind of variable, be it a measured parameter, a latent variable or a hypothesis. • They are not restricted to representing random variables, which represents another "Bayesian" aspect of a Bayesian network • Bayesian networks that model sequences of variables (such as for example speech signals or protein sequences) are called dynamic Bayesian networks. Generalizations of Bayesian networks that can represent and solve decision problems under2/10/2013 uncertainty are called influence diagrams. 119 © 2008 K.V.P Consulting; CMMI-Mils Presentation Version 2.2
    • Solution Approach Background - 3 • A Bayesian network is a carrier of the conditional independencies of a set of variables, not of their causal connections. • However, causal relations can be modeled by the closely related causal Bayesian network. • The additional semantics of the causal Bayesian networks specify that if a node X is actively caused to be in a given state x (an operation written as do(x)), then the probability density function changes to the one of the network obtained by cutting the links from Xs parents to X, and setting X to the caused value x (Pearl, 2000). • Using these semantics, one can predict the impact of external interventions from data obtained prior to intervention2/10/2013 120 © 2008 K.V.P Consulting; CMMI-Mils Presentation Version 2.2
    • Theoretical Conceptual way of thinking Graphical view2/10/2013 121 © 2008 K.V.P Consulting; CMMI-Mils Presentation Version 2.2
    • Conceptual way of thinking Graphical view The ‘Simple’ Model The Multi-Dimensional Model Timing Timing Target Target Target Life Target Life Ammunition Ammunition Time Time Attack Attack Platform Effectiveness Platform Effectiveness2/10/2013 122 © 2008 K.V.P Consulting; CMMI-Mils Presentation Version 2.2
    • Conceptual way of thinking Graphical view (4 out of 8 core elements)As we can see, each core element lives TimingIn its own three dimensions world.And have some overlappingwith at least two or more Targetsanother core elements withmore than one of the otherelement dimensions Ammunition Required Achievement 2/10/2013 123 © 2008 K.V.P Consulting; CMMI-Mils Presentation Version 2.2
    • Discussion Points • Ammunition performance data • Cost of poor planning building elements • Quantifying the operational impact of fire support planning • Effecting and effected stakeholders mapping • Quantifying the impact of fire support planning on the assaulting forces • Appling this model on other domains 1242/10/2013 © 2008 K.V.P Consulting; CMMI-Mils Presentation Version 2.2
    • Agenda 4 • Applying SCAMPI and Assessments to the Military Services • What we Looking For • Improvement Opportunities Suggestions • Current Status • Next Steps • About the Author • Contact2/10/2013 125 © 2008 K.V.P Consulting; CMMI-Mils Presentation Version 2.2
    • Applying SCAMPI and Assessments to the Military Services2/10/2013 © 2008 K.V.P Consulting; CMMI-Mils Presentation Version 2.2 126
    • Agenda 4 • Applying SCAMPI and Assessments to the Military Services • What we Looking For • Improvement Opportunities Suggestions • Current Status • Next Steps • About the Author • Contact2/10/2013 127 © 2008 K.V.P Consulting; CMMI-Mils Presentation Version 2.2
    • What we Looking For • Indicators on: •cultural •dependency •issues critical to Effects-based concept • Planning approaches to Complex conflict environments • Inter-Unit coordination throughout processes •External coordination throughout processes • Consideration of development of inter-arm / unit protocols or best practices • Inter-agency support is an integral ingredient for a functional Effects-based concept •Relationships? •Authority? •Strategic vs. operational vs. tactical •Coordination? Direction?2/10/2013 © 2008 K.V.P Consulting; CMMI-Mils Presentation 128 Version 2.2
    • Agenda 4 • Applying SCAMPI and Assessments to the Military Services • What we Looking For • Improvement Opportunities Suggestions • Current Status • Next Steps • About the Author • Contact2/10/2013 129 © 2008 K.V.P Consulting; CMMI-Mils Presentation Version 2.2
    • The objective of suggesting Improvement Opportunities Is to support the cconcepts of Effects Based Operations (Knowledge, Planning, Execution, Assessment) in order to assist the development of future processes, organizations and Tactical Capabilities2/10/2013 © 2008 K.V.P Consulting; CMMI-Mils Presentation 130 Version 2.2
    • Agenda 4 • Applying SCAMPI and Assessments to the Military Services • What we Looking For • Improvement Opportunities Suggestions • Current Status • Next Steps • About the Author • Contact2/10/2013 131 © 2008 K.V.P Consulting; CMMI-Mils Presentation Version 2.2
    • Current Status • Piloted successfully in ‘low’ level units • Segments were piloted in ‘high’ level units • All five volumes were reviewed and approved as first drafts • High maturity measurements were developed for combat units • Four level of mission process, process simulations were developed2/10/2013 132 © 2008 K.V.P Consulting; CMMI-Mils Presentation Version 2.2
    • Agenda 4 • Applying SCAMPI and Assessments to the Military Services • What we Looking For • Improvement Opportunities Suggestions • Current Status • Next Steps • About the Author • Contact2/10/2013 133 © 2008 K.V.P Consulting; CMMI-Mils Presentation Version 2.2
    • CMMI-Mils Project - Next Steps • Additional pilots on ‘high’ level units • The model five volumes are adjusted to additional agencies • High maturity measurements are developed for the other segments according to the work plan • Additional mission profiles are developed according to the work plan2/10/2013 134 © 2008 K.V.P Consulting; CMMI-Mils Presentation Version 2.2
    • Participants Suggested Next Steps • Read the full model • Understand the different levels (model) vs. Levels (Units) for best implementation • Verify that you have defined measures and goals for the different units and profiles2/10/2013 135 © 2008 K.V.P Consulting; CMMI-Mils Presentation Version 2.2
    • Agenda 4 • Applying SCAMPI and Assessments to the Military Services • What we Looking For • Improvement Opportunities Suggestions • Current Status • Next Steps • About the Author • Contact2/10/2013 136 © 2008 K.V.P Consulting; CMMI-Mils Presentation Version 2.2
    • About the Author • Kobi Vider - Picker • 20 Years of Military experience • Over 17 years of experience in process improvement • Working with organizations on process improvement from strategic level to developers • Using a combined approach of methods (CMMI, Six Sigma, ITIL, PMBOK, SCRUM and LEAN) • Have deep and comprehensive experience in process simulation, measurements and quantitative management approaches • Master Black Belt in Six Sigma • Drivers for this work and model • As part of my research on military process I have come to the conclusion that appropriate combination of industry best practices on the security and military world can improve the effectiveness of resource planning and usage an by it to leverage mission success2/10/2013 137 © 2008 K.V.P Consulting; CMMI-Mils Presentation Version 2.2
    • Contact Kobi Vider – Picker K.V.P Consulting +972522946676 Kobi.vider@hotmail.com Kobivp@aol.com2/10/2013 © 2008 K.V.P Consulting; CMMI-Mils Presentation Version 2.2 138
    • 2/10/2013 © 2008 K.V.P Consulting; CMMI-Mils Presentation 139 Version 2.2