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Ukbi 2011 presentation - Maximising Commercial Impact from public R&D
 

Ukbi 2011 presentation - Maximising Commercial Impact from public R&D

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This was the deck that I used to present at the UKBI 2011 conference @ the Hilton in Manchester UK. ...

This was the deck that I used to present at the UKBI 2011 conference @ the Hilton in Manchester UK.

As the slides seemed popular I thought that I'd better load them!

They are very graphic intensive and low in narrative/text - as is my style - so if you really are interested in understanding the content you could tweet me @brianamc

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  • \nNot only corporates that can benefit from the Innovation Division of Labour\nUniversities (and KTs not fully exploiting this yet!! LINK to project focus!!\n
  • He wound up at an MIT conference for young pres- idents when coincidentally the subject of Linux came up. Perched in the lec- ture hall, McEwen listened intently to the remarkable story of how Linus Torvalds and a loose volunteer brigade of software developers had assembled the world-class computer operating system over the Internet. The lecturer explained how Torvalds revealed his code to the world, allowing thousands of anonymous programmers to vet it and make contributions of their own.\nMcEwen had an epiphany and sat back in his chair to contemplate. If Goldcorp employees couldn’t find the Red Lake gold, maybe someone else could. And maybe the key to finding those people was to open up the ex- ploration process in the same way Torvalds “open sourced” Linux.\nMcEwen raced back to Toronto to present the idea to his head geolo- gist. “I’d like to take all of our geology, all the data we have that goes back to 1948, and put it into a file and share it with the world,” he said. “Then we’ll ask the world to tell us where we’re going to find the next six million ounces of gold.” McEwen saw this as an opportunity to harness some of the best minds in the industry. Perhaps understandably, the in-house geol- ogists were just a little skeptical.\nMining is an intensely secretive industry, and apart from the minerals themselves, geological data is the most precious and carefully guarded re- source. It’s like the Cadbury secret—it’s just not something companies go around sharing. Goldcorp employees wondered whether the global com- munity of geologists would respond to Goldcorp’s call in the same way that software developers rallied around Linus Torvalds. Moreover, they worried about how the contest would reflect on them and their inability to find the illusive gold deposits.\nMcEwen acknowledges in retrospect that the strategy was controversial and risky.\n\nThe contestants had identified 110 targets on the Red Lake property, 50 percent of which had not been previously identified by the company. Over 80 percent of the new targets yielded substantial quantities of gold. In fact, since the challenge was initiated an astounding eight million ounces of gold have been found. McEwen estimates the collaborative process shaved two to three years off their exploration time.\n\nBut with 55,000 acres, nobody at Goldcorp could figure out where to look for the buried treasure. To avert a wild goose chase, McEwan shared on the Web Goldcorp's geological data going back to 1948 and offered $575,000 in prizes to those who could come up with the best way to find and extract the gold.\nParticipants in the contest found 55 drilling targets Goldcorp had not identified. Eighty percent hit pay dirt. "In fact, since the challenge was initiated, an astounding eight million ounces of gold have been found" and in four years Goldcorp's cost of production dropped 600%.\n\n
  • He wound up at an MIT conference for young pres- idents when coincidentally the subject of Linux came up. Perched in the lec- ture hall, McEwen listened intently to the remarkable story of how Linus Torvalds and a loose volunteer brigade of software developers had assembled the world-class computer operating system over the Internet. The lecturer explained how Torvalds revealed his code to the world, allowing thousands of anonymous programmers to vet it and make contributions of their own.\nMcEwen had an epiphany and sat back in his chair to contemplate. If Goldcorp employees couldn’t find the Red Lake gold, maybe someone else could. And maybe the key to finding those people was to open up the ex- ploration process in the same way Torvalds “open sourced” Linux.\nMcEwen raced back to Toronto to present the idea to his head geolo- gist. “I’d like to take all of our geology, all the data we have that goes back to 1948, and put it into a file and share it with the world,” he said. “Then we’ll ask the world to tell us where we’re going to find the next six million ounces of gold.” McEwen saw this as an opportunity to harness some of the best minds in the industry. Perhaps understandably, the in-house geol- ogists were just a little skeptical.\nMining is an intensely secretive industry, and apart from the minerals themselves, geological data is the most precious and carefully guarded re- source. It’s like the Cadbury secret—it’s just not something companies go around sharing. Goldcorp employees wondered whether the global com- munity of geologists would respond to Goldcorp’s call in the same way that software developers rallied around Linus Torvalds. Moreover, they worried about how the contest would reflect on them and their inability to find the illusive gold deposits.\nMcEwen acknowledges in retrospect that the strategy was controversial and risky.\n\nThe contestants had identified 110 targets on the Red Lake property, 50 percent of which had not been previously identified by the company. Over 80 percent of the new targets yielded substantial quantities of gold. In fact, since the challenge was initiated an astounding eight million ounces of gold have been found. McEwen estimates the collaborative process shaved two to three years off their exploration time.\n\nBut with 55,000 acres, nobody at Goldcorp could figure out where to look for the buried treasure. To avert a wild goose chase, McEwan shared on the Web Goldcorp's geological data going back to 1948 and offered $575,000 in prizes to those who could come up with the best way to find and extract the gold.\nParticipants in the contest found 55 drilling targets Goldcorp had not identified. Eighty percent hit pay dirt. "In fact, since the challenge was initiated, an astounding eight million ounces of gold have been found" and in four years Goldcorp's cost of production dropped 600%.\n\n
  • He wound up at an MIT conference for young pres- idents when coincidentally the subject of Linux came up. Perched in the lec- ture hall, McEwen listened intently to the remarkable story of how Linus Torvalds and a loose volunteer brigade of software developers had assembled the world-class computer operating system over the Internet. The lecturer explained how Torvalds revealed his code to the world, allowing thousands of anonymous programmers to vet it and make contributions of their own.\nMcEwen had an epiphany and sat back in his chair to contemplate. If Goldcorp employees couldn’t find the Red Lake gold, maybe someone else could. And maybe the key to finding those people was to open up the ex- ploration process in the same way Torvalds “open sourced” Linux.\nMcEwen raced back to Toronto to present the idea to his head geolo- gist. “I’d like to take all of our geology, all the data we have that goes back to 1948, and put it into a file and share it with the world,” he said. “Then we’ll ask the world to tell us where we’re going to find the next six million ounces of gold.” McEwen saw this as an opportunity to harness some of the best minds in the industry. Perhaps understandably, the in-house geol- ogists were just a little skeptical.\nMining is an intensely secretive industry, and apart from the minerals themselves, geological data is the most precious and carefully guarded re- source. It’s like the Cadbury secret—it’s just not something companies go around sharing. Goldcorp employees wondered whether the global com- munity of geologists would respond to Goldcorp’s call in the same way that software developers rallied around Linus Torvalds. Moreover, they worried about how the contest would reflect on them and their inability to find the illusive gold deposits.\nMcEwen acknowledges in retrospect that the strategy was controversial and risky.\n\nThe contestants had identified 110 targets on the Red Lake property, 50 percent of which had not been previously identified by the company. Over 80 percent of the new targets yielded substantial quantities of gold. In fact, since the challenge was initiated an astounding eight million ounces of gold have been found. McEwen estimates the collaborative process shaved two to three years off their exploration time.\n\nBut with 55,000 acres, nobody at Goldcorp could figure out where to look for the buried treasure. To avert a wild goose chase, McEwan shared on the Web Goldcorp's geological data going back to 1948 and offered $575,000 in prizes to those who could come up with the best way to find and extract the gold.\nParticipants in the contest found 55 drilling targets Goldcorp had not identified. Eighty percent hit pay dirt. "In fact, since the challenge was initiated, an astounding eight million ounces of gold have been found" and in four years Goldcorp's cost of production dropped 600%.\n\n
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  • SEE http://www.timeshighereducation.co.uk/story.asp?sectioncode=26&storycode=413162\n\nAND\n\nhttp://www.guardian.co.uk/science/video/2010/aug/04/gameculture-crowdsourcing\n
  • SEE http://www.timeshighereducation.co.uk/story.asp?sectioncode=26&storycode=413162\n\nAND\n\nhttp://www.guardian.co.uk/science/video/2010/aug/04/gameculture-crowdsourcing\n
  • SEE http://www.timeshighereducation.co.uk/story.asp?sectioncode=26&storycode=413162\n\nAND\n\nhttp://www.guardian.co.uk/science/video/2010/aug/04/gameculture-crowdsourcing\n
  • SEE http://www.timeshighereducation.co.uk/story.asp?sectioncode=26&storycode=413162\n\nAND\n\nhttp://www.guardian.co.uk/science/video/2010/aug/04/gameculture-crowdsourcing\n
  • SEE http://www.timeshighereducation.co.uk/story.asp?sectioncode=26&storycode=413162\n\nAND\n\nhttp://www.guardian.co.uk/science/video/2010/aug/04/gameculture-crowdsourcing\n
  • SEE http://www.timeshighereducation.co.uk/story.asp?sectioncode=26&storycode=413162\n\nAND\n\nhttp://www.guardian.co.uk/science/video/2010/aug/04/gameculture-crowdsourcing\n
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  • \nAt least for first filter for ideas. Distribute the workload!\nWith a small team evaluating all ideas, the workload can be large. Change that equation. With a large number of participants evaluating a small number of ideas, the work of identifying the most promising ideas is significantly easier, and better.\nThe great thing here is that people will self-select to provide feedback. They naturally weigh in on what interests them.\n
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  • Can EMPLOY them all:\n\nnot matter how big you are you will not have the skill set to cover 4-6K researchers...\n\nNo matter how big you are you will not have the industrial or sector links you need\n\nNo matter how big you are you will not have \n\nWANT to employ them ...\ncoming reduction in public funding ... \nimpact \n\nLinks to the abilityt to give some skin in the game...\n\nInstitutions need people to organise peopel \nthey take on goals other thatn orgingal goals\n\n
  • Can EMPLOY them all:\n\nnot matter how big you are you will not have the skill set to cover 4-6K researchers...\n\nNo matter how big you are you will not have the industrial or sector links you need\n\nNo matter how big you are you will not have \n\nWANT to employ them ...\ncoming reduction in public funding ... \nimpact \n\nLinks to the abilityt to give some skin in the game...\n\nInstitutions need people to organise peopel \nthey take on goals other thatn orgingal goals\n\n
  • Can EMPLOY them all:\n\nnot matter how big you are you will not have the skill set to cover 4-6K researchers...\n\nNo matter how big you are you will not have the industrial or sector links you need\n\nNo matter how big you are you will not have \n\nWANT to employ them ...\ncoming reduction in public funding ... \nimpact \n\nLinks to the abilityt to give some skin in the game...\n\nInstitutions need people to organise peopel \nthey take on goals other thatn orgingal goals\n\n
  • Can EMPLOY them all:\n\nnot matter how big you are you will not have the skill set to cover 4-6K researchers...\n\nNo matter how big you are you will not have the industrial or sector links you need\n\nNo matter how big you are you will not have \n\nWANT to employ them ...\ncoming reduction in public funding ... \nimpact \n\nLinks to the abilityt to give some skin in the game...\n\nInstitutions need people to organise peopel \nthey take on goals other thatn orgingal goals\n\n
  • Can EMPLOY them all:\n\nnot matter how big you are you will not have the skill set to cover 4-6K researchers...\n\nNo matter how big you are you will not have the industrial or sector links you need\n\nNo matter how big you are you will not have \n\nWANT to employ them ...\ncoming reduction in public funding ... \nimpact \n\nLinks to the abilityt to give some skin in the game...\n\nInstitutions need people to organise peopel \nthey take on goals other thatn orgingal goals\n\n
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  • At very least, other forms of financing - angel investing, bootstrapping, or using public grants - will become all the more crucial to the financing of early ventures. Or some more complex mix of all. Studies show that Angel funds in the US are not far below traditional venture capital.\n\n
  • At very least, other forms of financing - angel investing, bootstrapping, or using public grants - will become all the more crucial to the financing of early ventures. Or some more complex mix of all. Studies show that Angel funds in the US are not far below traditional venture capital.\n\n
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  • External had:\nproduct dev and regulatory expertise\nNew the dental market\nHad access to investor networks\n
  • External had:\nproduct dev and regulatory expertise\nNew the dental market\nHad access to investor networks\n
  • External had:\nproduct dev and regulatory expertise\nNew the dental market\nHad access to investor networks\n
  • External had:\nproduct dev and regulatory expertise\nNew the dental market\nHad access to investor networks\n
  • External had:\nproduct dev and regulatory expertise\nNew the dental market\nHad access to investor networks\n
  • External had:\nproduct dev and regulatory expertise\nNew the dental market\nHad access to investor networks\n
  • External had:\nproduct dev and regulatory expertise\nNew the dental market\nHad access to investor networks\n
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Ukbi 2011 presentation - Maximising Commercial Impact from public R&D Ukbi 2011 presentation - Maximising Commercial Impact from public R&D Presentation Transcript

  • Maximising Commercial Impact of UK R&D Brian McCaul Director of Commercialisation University of Leeds
  • Maximising Commercial Impact of UK R&D Brian McCaul Director of Commercialisation University of Leeds
  • Maximising Commercial Impact of UK R&D Brian McCaul Knowledge Transfer 2.0 Services
  • State of the Knowledge Transfer Nation...?
  • State of the Knowledge Transfer Nation...? Not
  • State of the Knowledge Transfer Nation...? Not No prescribed Programme
  • State of the Knowledge Transfer Nation...? Not No prescribed Programme No Best Practice Model
  • State of the Knowledge Transfer Nation...? Not No prescribed Programme No Best Practice Model Just some examples that have worked
  • Some trends inInnovation practice...
  • Towards OpennessOpen InnovationOpen SourceCrowd sourcingCo-creation“most of the smart peopledon’t work for you”
  • “I’d like to take all of our geology, all the data we have that goesback to 1948, and put it into a file and share it with the world,”
  • Over 80 percent of the new targets yielded substantial quantities ofgold. 8 million ounces of gold found. Shaved two to three years offexploration time.
  • Towards Collaboration..
  • Towards Collaboration..
  • Towards Collaboration.. KT was about individual research excellence - groups or individuals
  • Towards Collaboration.. KT 2.0 understands that innovation is a social process KT was about individual research excellence - groups or individuals
  • Towards Collaboration.. KT 2.0 understands that innovation is a social process KT was about individual research excellence - groups or individuals
  • Procter & Gamble
  • Procter & Gamble Harvard Business Review article authored by two P&G executives, the companyʼs innovation success rate has more than doubled while the cost of innovation has fallen
  • Towards Services... Actual Forecast100 Shift towards Services in the US since 1800 75 Agriculture Per cent-age Goods 50 Services 25 Year Source: J Spoher, Haas School of Business (via H Chesbrough) 0 1800 1850 1900 1950 2000 2010 2050 services goods agriculture
  • Innovation Platform or Burning Platform...Nokia’s CEO’s wake-up call to his firm’s “burning platform” - resulting from a failure to keep-up with innovation in the mobile space – is a timely reminder of how ‘platforms’ themselves are thekey to staying ahead of the game.Maybe the new Microsoft tie-up will turn things round – maybe it won’t. But this short video of Henry Chesbrough is a neat summary of how innovation changed while Nokia wasnt looking.It seems increasingly that key to building such innovation platforms - as with Google Android, now the largest mobile platform, and the Apple iPhone operating system - has been openness toco-creation, and user-innovation. This not only applies to innovation strategy in the software space but, increasingly, in the product space, as articles in the New York Times and TheEconomist have recently addressed. Summary: there appears to be a real price to be paid for a lack of openness in both product and software innovation.
  • Innovation Platform or Burning Platform... "Our competitors arent taking our market share with devices; they are taking our market share with an entire ecosystem...Nokia’s CEO’s wake-up call to his firm’s “burning platform” - resulting from a failure to keep-up with innovation in the mobile space – is a timely reminder of how ‘platforms’ themselves are thekey to staying ahead of the game.Maybe the new Microsoft tie-up will turn things round – maybe it won’t. But this short video of Henry Chesbrough is a neat summary of how innovation changed while Nokia wasnt looking. Were not collaborating internally... Nokia,It seems increasingly that key to building such innovation platforms - as with Google Android, now the largest mobile platform, and the Apple iPhone operating system - has been openness toco-creation, and user-innovation. This not only applies to innovation strategy in the software space but, increasingly, in the product space, as articles in the New York Times and TheEconomist have recently addressed. Summary: there appears to be a real price to be paid for a lack of openness in both product and software innovation. our platform is burning." Nokia CEO Stephen Elop
  • Innovation Platform or Burning Platform...Nokia’s CEO’s wake-up call to his firm’s “burning platform” - resulting from a failure to keep-up with innovation in the mobile space – is a timely reminder of how ‘platforms’ themselves are thekey to staying ahead of the game.Maybe the new Microsoft tie-up will turn things round – maybe it won’t. But this short video of Henry Chesbrough is a neat summary of how innovation changed while Nokia wasnt looking.It seems increasingly that key to building such innovation platforms - as with Google Android, now the largest mobile platform, and the Apple iPhone operating system - has been openness toco-creation, and user-innovation. This not only applies to innovation strategy in the software space but, increasingly, in the product space, as articles in the New York Times and TheEconomist have recently addressed. Summary: there appears to be a real price to be paid for a lack of openness in both product and software innovation.
  • Innovation Platform or Burning Platform...Nokia’s CEO’s wake-up call to his firm’s “burning platform” - resulting from a failure to keep-up with innovation in the mobile space – is a timely reminder of how ‘platforms’ themselves are thekey to staying ahead of the game.Maybe the new Microsoft tie-up will turn things round – maybe it won’t. But this short video of Henry Chesbrough is a neat summary of how innovation changed while Nokia wasnt looking.It seems increasingly that key to building such innovation platforms - as with Google Android, now the largest mobile platform, and the Apple iPhone operating system - has been openness toco-creation, and user-innovation. This not only applies to innovation strategy in the software space but, increasingly, in the product space, as articles in the New York Times and TheEconomist have recently addressed. Summary: there appears to be a real price to be paid for a lack of openness in both product and software innovation. “Whenever we see a business plan for a new device, we immediately ask. OK, where’s the services associated with that device”
  • So how does this allow us to increase‘Impact’ & improve IP transfer...
  • 3 Pinch-points make KT inefficient
  • 3 Pinch-points make KT inefficient n tio lec Se ct je ro 1P
  • 3 Pinch-points make KT inefficient 2B n tio us lec ine Se ss De ct je ve ro lop 1P me nt
  • 3 Pinch-points make KT inefficient 2B n tio us lec ine Se ss De ct je ve ro lop 1P me nt 3 The Funding Valley of Death
  • 1Pinch-pointSelection
  • 1 Pinch-point SelectionIt’s not too many good ideas
  • 1 Pinch-point SelectionIt’s not too many good ideasIt’s not too little resource
  • 1 Pinch-point SelectionIt’s not too many good ideasIt’s not too little resourceIt’s Filter Failure
  • Filtering:
  • Filtering:Is time-consuming
  • Filtering:Is time-consumingRequires a lot of clever people
  • Filtering:Is time-consumingRequires a lot of clever peopleIs still not the market, but a guess
  • The digital age has ushered newways to filter information...Crowds, with cognitive diversity & multiple perspectives,in aggregate provide stronger raw intelligence of any single person
  • Project selection through the:Wisdom of the CrowdImproves decision making, removes aconstraint, increases transparency...
  • Scaling Development Capability
  • Scaling Development Capability 2B us ine ss De ve lop me nt
  • Pinch-point You can’t do it all alone...
  • Pinch-point You can’t do it all alone... KT used to be about assembling and employing the most able team
  • Pinch-point You can’t do it all alone... KT used to be about KT 2.0  is all about assembling and employing assembling & connecting the most able team the right network
  • Proposition 1You can’t do it all alone...
  • Proposition 1You can’t do it all alone... KT 2.0  is about assembling the right network…
  • Proposition 1You can’t do it all alone... KT 2.0  is about assembling the right network… Can’t employ all the smart people...
  • Proposition 1You can’t do it all alone... KT 2.0  is about assembling the right network… Can’t employ all the smart people... Don’t want to employ them...
  • Proposition 1 You can’t do it all alone... KT 2.0  is about assembling the right network… Can’t employ all the smart people... Don’t want to employ them... Can give ‘skin’ toParticularly to plan non-emloyees...and develop acomplex businessproposition
  • Overcoming Investment Constraints
  • Overcoming Investment Constraints 3 The Funding Valley of Death
  • We can’t wait for the lightning strike Externals more credible Project selection via externals better KT was solely focused on the large VC deal and avoidance of the ‘low-value’ deal
  • We can’t wait for the lightning strike KT2.0 understands that alternative funding/exit strategies will become an important part of the mix Externals more credible Project selection via externals better KT was solely focused on the large VC deal and avoidance of the ‘low-value’ deal
  • We can’t wait for the lightning strike KT2.0 understands that alternative funding/exit strategies will become an important part of the mix Externals more credible Project selection via externals better KT was solely focused on the large VC deal and avoidance of the ‘low-value’ deal
  • “the future isn’t biganymore, the futureis small”
  • “the future isn’t biganymore, the futureis small”we might revisitthe dismissivenotion of the‘walking dead’spinout.
  • Pinch-pointCascading ExploitationOpportunities
  • Pinch-pointCascading ExploitationOpportunitiesIP Group or Fusion IP etc
  • Pinch-pointCascading ExploitationOpportunitiesIP Group or Fusion IP etc Tech Transfer Office
  • Pinch-pointCascading ExploitationOpportunitiesIP Group or Fusion IP etc Tech Transfer Office Virtual Community
  • Pinch-pointCascading ExploitationOpportunitiesIP Group or Fusion IP etc Tech Transfer Office Virtual Community IP-net
  • Pinch-pointCascading ExploitationOpportunitiesIP Group or Fusion IP etc Tech Transfer Office Virtual Community IP-net ‘Glasgow model’
  • Pinch-pointCascading ExploitationOpportunitiesIP Group or Fusion IP etc Tech Transfer Office Virtual Community IP-net ‘Glasgow model’ The academic
  • Pinch-pointCascading ExploitationOpportunitiesIP Group or Fusion IP etc Tech Transfer Office Virtual Community IP-net ‘Glasgow model’ The academic
  • Pinch-pointCascading ExploitationOpportunitiesIP Group or Fusion IP etc Tech Transfer Office Virtual Community IP-net ‘Glasgow model’ The academic
  • Green Chemical Dyeing Technology
  • Green Chemical Dyeing Technology
  • Green Chemical Dyeing Technology ...by VC because took a year to review
  • Green Chemical Dyeing Technology ...by VC because took a year to review FILTER FAILURE
  • Green Chemical Dyeing Technology ...by VC because took a year to review FILTER FAILURE & University didn’t have connections to market
  • Green Chemical Dyeing Technology ...by VC because took a year to review FILTER FAILURE & University didn’t have connections to market FAILURE TO COLLABORATE
  • Green Chemical Dyeing Technology ...by VC because took a year to review FILTER FAILURE & University didn’t have connections to market FAILURE TO COLLABORATE
  • Green Chemical Dyeing Technology
  • Green Chemical Dyeing Technology ...Now largest Licence option for University
  • Internal Committee Rejected as “not compelling” FILTER FAILURE Full value lies in platform for other services
  • Internal Committee Rejected as “not compelling” FILTER FAILURE Full value lies in platform for other services
  • First Angel Investment seven yearsFirst Sales, broad range of marketsLot of press attention...
  • Filling without Drilling
  • Filling without Drilling
  • Filling without Drilling Because VC sat on it since 2003
  • Filling without Drilling Because VC sat on it since 2003 FILTER FAILURE
  • Filling without Drilling Because VC sat on it since 2003 FILTER FAILURE University failed to progress
  • Filling without Drilling Because VC sat on it since 2003 FILTER FAILURE University failed to progressLACK OF INTERNAL BIZ DEV. CAPABILITY
  • Filling without Drilling Because VC sat on it since 2003 FILTER FAILURE University failed to progressLACK OF INTERNAL BIZ DEV. CAPABILITY Spun out - Oversubscribed First investment round of £1.5m
  • Filling without Drilling Because VC sat on it since 2003 FILTER FAILURE University failed to progressLACK OF INTERNAL BIZ DEV. CAPABILITY Spun out - Oversubscribed First investment round of £1.5m
  • Ten-fold Income Increase...1000000 ere! 750000 rts h Licence Income a nt st 500000 rime 250000 Expe 0 2004/5 2005/6 2006/07 2008/09 2009/10 2010/11 20011/12
  • Ten-fold Income Increase...1000000 ere! 750000 rts h Licence Income a nt st 500000 rime 250000 Expe 0 2004/5 2005/6 2006/07 2008/09 2009/10 2010/11 20011/12 With reduced cost base...
  • A New Game - New Rules... Knowledge Transfer 2.0 Getting more from less
  • Openness Accelerates Innovation & improves selection
  • Openness Accelerates Innovation & improves selectionCollaboration Provides Scalability & Reduces risk
  • Openness Accelerates Innovation & improves selectionCollaboration Provides Scalability & Reduces risk
  • Openness Accelerates Innovation & improves selectionCollaboration Provides Scalability & Reduces risk Building a Platform is Critical to Facilitating this
  • ... and to speed and scale ‘Impact’ and IP flow!
  • ThanksBrian.mccaul@mac.com Twitter: @brianamc