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Sarah & Dana's presentation from MAME 2012 about using Diigo to support close reading of digital text.

Sarah & Dana's presentation from MAME 2012 about using Diigo to support close reading of digital text.

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Digging deeper with diigo Digging deeper with diigo Presentation Transcript

  • Digging Deeper with Diigo:Using technology to facilitate close reading of digital text Sarah Zietz, Librarian Dana Bleicher, English Department Chair Grand Blanc High School
  • What is Diigo? Collect, highlight, remember Share – with colleagues and/or students Highlight Bookmark Tag/organize Notes Comments/sticky notes Images
  • Bookmark
  • Make connections, ask questions, drawconclusions using sticky notes
  • Highlight Highlight areas of confusion, bias, main ideas, evidence, etc. Set up a standard color key ahead of time such as:  Yellow – thesis and/or main ideas  Blue – supporting evidence  Green – author conclusions  Pink – opposing viewpoints
  • Share
  • Common Core Literacy The new benchmarks increase emphasis on:  Close/Attentive Reading  Critical Thinking About the Text/Higher “Cognitive Demand”  Determine Author Purpose or Bias  Formulate & Defend Opinion  Identify Claim vs. Assumption  Higher Level Reasoning  Make logical inferences  Analyze the structure of texts  Compare and contrast treatments of the same topic  Reading Informational Texts “[The benchmarks are based on an] assumption that literacy is a shared responsibility.”“Common Core State Standards Webinar." Interview. Video blog post. Webinar. Scholastic, 25 Oct. 2010. Web.<https://scholastic.webex.com/>.Common Core Institute. "Aligning Assessments to the Common Core State Standards." Common Core. Holiday Inn Detroit - Livonia,Detroit. 18 Oct. 2011. Lecture.
  • Why Focus on Reading?According to Doug Lemov, author of Teach Like a Champion, ―Reading is the skill. Teaching students to unlock the full meaning of the texts they read is the single most important skill a teacher can foster. If your students can read well, they can essentially do anything.‖Lemov goes on to make the case that ―If you teach, no matter the subject, you have the opportunity and the obligation to ensure that your students read more (and better). This opportunity will result in their being both more informed regarding the topic of your instruction and more effective assimilators and analyzers of information – better readers – in the future. It’s a double investment paying both short- and long-term results.‖Lemov, Doug. Teach like a Champion: 49 Techniques That Put Students on the Path to College. San Francisco: Jossey-Bass, 2010. Print. Page 249
  • Status Quo Statistics are Grim• ―The American Institutes for Research (AIR) reports that only 13% of American adults are capable of performing complex literacy tasks.‖• ―The National Assessment of Educational Progress (NAEP) shows that secondary school students are reading significantly below expected levels.‖• ―The National Assessment of Adult Literacy (NAAL) finds that literacy scores of high school graduates have dropped between 1992 and 2003.‖Publication. NTCE Principles of Adolescent Literacy Reform. National Council of Teachers of English, Apr. 2006. Web. 29 Aug. 2010. <http://www.ncte.org/library/NCTEFiles/Resources/Positions/Adol-Lit-Brief.pdf>.
  • …Getting Worried Yet?  The National Center for Educational Statistics (NCES) reports a continuing and significant reading achievement gap between certain racial/ethnic/SES groups.  The Alliance for Excellent Education (AEE) points to 8.7 million secondary school students— that is one in four—who are unable to read and comprehend the material in their textbooks.  The 2005 ACT College Readiness Benchmark for Reading found that only about half the students tested were ready for college-level reading, and the 2005 scores were the lowest in a decade.Publication. NTCE Principles of Adolescent Literacy Reform. National Council of Teachers of English, Apr. 2006.Web. 29 Aug. 2010. <http://www.ncte.org/library/NCTEFiles/Resources/Positions/Adol-Lit-Brief.pdf>.
  • Too Many of our StudentsStruggle with ReadingComprehension ―The ability to read and understand complicated information is important to success in college and, increasingly, in the workplace. An analysis of the NAEP long-term trend reading assessments reveals that only half of all White 17 year olds, less than one-quarter of Latino 17 year olds, and less than one-fifth of African American 17 year olds can read at this level.‖ ―By age 17, only about 1 in 17 seventeen year olds can read and gain information from specialized text, for example the science section in the local newspaper.‖ ―This includes:  1 in 12 White 17 year olds,  1 in 50 Latino 17 year olds, and  1 in 100 African American 17 year olds.‖Haycock, Kati and Sandra Huang, Are Todays High School Graduates Ready?, Thinking K-16, Vol. 5, Issue 1, The Education Trust, Washington, DC, 2001.
  • More Reading Can Help Close Achievement Gaps. “People who are undernourished need good food. Readers who are under- nourished need good books. Lots of them.”Gallagher, Kelly, and Richard L. Allington. Readicide: How Schools Are Killing Reading and What You Can Do aboutIt. Portland, Me.: Stenhouse, 2009. Print. Page 32
  • Content Area Literacy isKeyAgain, according to Doug Lemov, ―…Untapped opportunities to read more effectively occur throughout every corner of the building…The overall value of the additional high-quality reading you could do in a typical school day could equal or possibly exceed the value of what happens in designated reading classes. When you stop to consider how much high quality reading students might do outside reading class, the untapped potential is massive, but for now, most students simply don’t read much.‖He goes on to explain that…‖We are what we have read and how we read it, and no other single activity has the capacity to yield so much educational value. And yet students in many schools spend precious little time actually reading. Likely, they read for less than an hour a day. Even in their reading or literature classes, they are as likely to talk about a reading or respond to what they may (or may not) have read as they are to actually read.‖Lemov, Doug. Teach like a Champion: 49 Techniques That Put Students on the Path to College. San Francisco: Jossey-Bass, 2010. Print. Pages 250-251
  • Common Core Reading The new benchmarks redefine what our students should be reading… 1) They call for a dramatic increase in informational reading. • 4th Grade: 50% Literary 50% Informational • 8th Grade: 45% Literary 55% Informational • 12th Grade 30% Literary 70% Informational 2) They call for a dramatic increase in the “lexile” difficulty of student texts. "Common Core State Standards Webinar." Interview. Video blog post. Webinar. Scholastic, 25 Oct. 2010. Web. <https://scholastic.webex.com/>.
  • Change in text complexity in textbooks over the last century Source: MetametricsHall, Amber. "Common Core State Standards Overview." Grand Blanc CommunitySchools. Oct. 2011. Lecture. Power Point
  • Lexile levels today and with CCSS…an increase of two levels. Current Common Core Typical text measures Text complexity grade bands (by grade) and associated Lexile rangesHall, Amber. "Common Core State Standards Overview." Grand Blanc CommunitySchools. Oct. 2011. Lecture. Power Point
  • CCSS Anchor Reading Standards Main Ideas and Details  CCSS.ELA-Literacy.CCRA.R.1 Read closely to determine what the text says explicitly and to make logical inferences from it; cite specific textual evidence when writing or speaking to support conclusions drawn from the text.  CCSS.ELA-Literacy.CCRA.R.2 Determine central ideas or themes of a text and analyze their development; summarize the key supporting details and ideas.  CCSS.ELA-Literacy.CCRA.R.3 Analyze how and why individuals, events, or ideas develop and interact over the course of a text. Craft and Structure  CCSS.ELA-Literacy.CCRA.R.4 Interpret words and phrases as they are used in a text, including determining technical, connotative, and figurative meanings, and analyze how specific word choices shape meaning or tone.  CCSS.ELA-Literacy.CCRA.R.5 Analyze the structure of texts, including how specific sentences, paragraphs, and larger portions of the text (e.g., a section, chapter, scene, or stanza) relate to each other and the whole.  CCSS.ELA-Literacy.CCRA.R.6 Assess how point of view or purpose shapes the content and style of a text. Integration of Knowledge and Ideas  CCSS.ELA-Literacy.CCRA.R.7 Integrate and evaluate content presented in diverse media and formats, including visually and quantitatively, as well as in words.1  CCSS.ELA-Literacy.CCRA.R.8 Delineate and evaluate the argument and specific claims in a text, including the validity of the reasoning as well as the relevance and sufficiency of the evidence.  CCSS.ELA-Literacy.CCRA.R.9 Analyze how two or more texts address similar themes or topics in order to build knowledge or to compare the approaches the authors take. Range of Reading and Level of Text ComplexityCommon Core State Standards for English Language Arts and comprehend complex literary and and Technical Subjects. N.p.: Common Core Sta  CCSS.ELA-Literacy.CCRA.R.10 Read & Literacy in History/Social Studies, Science, informational texts independently and proficiently.
  • CCSS Anchor Reading Standards Supported by Close Reading: Main Ideas and Details  CCSS.ELA-Literacy.CCRA.R.1 Read closely to determine what the text says explicitly and to make logical inferences from it; cite specific textual evidence when writing or speaking to support conclusions drawn from the text. Craft and Structure  CCSS.ELA-Literacy.CCRA.R.4 Interpret words and phrases as they are used in a text, including determining technical, connotative, and figurative meanings, and analyze how specific word choices shape meaning or tone.  CCSS.ELA-Literacy.CCRA.R.5 Analyze the structure of texts, including how specific sentences, paragraphs, and larger portions of the text (e.g., a section, chapter, scene, or stanza) relate to each other and the whole. Integration of Knowledge and Ideas  CCSS.ELA-Literacy.CCRA.R.8 Delineate and evaluate the argument and specific claims in a text, including the validity of the reasoning as well as the relevance and sufficiency of the evidence.Common Core State Standards for English Language Arts & Literacy in History/Social Studies, Science, and Technical Subjects. N.p.: Common Core Sta  CCSS.ELA-Literacy.CCRA.R.9 Analyze how two or more texts address similar themes or topics in order to build knowledge or to compare the
  • CCSS Anchor Writing Standards Text Types and Purposes1  CCSS.ELA-Literacy.CCRA.W.1 Write arguments to support claims in an analysis of substantive topics or texts using valid reasoning and relevant and sufficient evidence.  CCSS.ELA-Literacy.CCRA.W.2 Write informative/explanatory texts to examine and convey complex ideas and information clearly and accurately through the effective selection, organization, and analysis of content.  CCSS.ELA-Literacy.CCRA.W.3 Write narratives to develop real or imagined experiences or events using effective technique, well-chosen details and well-structured event sequences. Production and Distribution of Writing  CCSS.ELA-Literacy.CCRA.W.4 Produce clear and coherent writing in which the development, organization, and style are appropriate to task, purpose, and audience.  CCSS.ELA-Literacy.CCRA.W.5 Develop and strengthen writing as needed by planning, revising, editing, rewriting, or trying a new approach.  CCSS.ELA-Literacy.CCRA.W.6 Use technology, including the Internet, to produce and publish writing and to interact and collaborate with others. Research to Build and Present Knowledge  CCSS.ELA-Literacy.CCRA.W.7 Conduct short as well as more sustained research projects based on focused questions, demonstrating understanding of the subject under investigation.  CCSS.ELA-Literacy.CCRA.W.8 Gather relevant information from multiple print and digital sources, assess the credibility and accuracy of each source, and integrate the information while avoiding plagiarism.  CCSS.ELA-Literacy.CCRA.W.9 Draw evidence from literary or informational texts to support analysis, reflection, and research. Range of Writing  CCSS.ELA-Literacy.CCRA.W.10 Write routinely over extended time frames (time for research, reflection, and revision) and shorter time frames (a single sitting or a day or two) for a range of tasks, purposes, and audiences.Common Core State Standards for English Language Arts & Literacy in History/Social Studies, Science, and Technical Subjects. N.p.: Common Core Sta
  • CCSS Anchor Writing Standards Supported by Close Reading/Use of Diigo Text Types and Purposes1  CCSS.ELA-Literacy.CCRA.W.1 Write arguments to support claims in an analysis of substantive topics or texts using valid reasoning and relevant and sufficient evidence.  CCSS.ELA-Literacy.CCRA.W.2 Write informative/explanatory texts to examine and convey complex ideas and information clearly and accurately through the effective selection, organization, and analysis of content. Production and Distribution of Writing  CCSS.ELA-Literacy.CCRA.W.6 Use technology, including the Internet, to produce and publish writing and to interact and collaborate with others. Research to Build and Present Knowledge  CCSS.ELA-Literacy.CCRA.W.8 Gather relevant information from multiple print and digital sources, assess the credibility and accuracy of each source, and integrate the information while avoiding plagiarism.  CCSS.ELA-Literacy.CCRA.W.9 Draw evidence from literary or informational texts to support analysis, reflection, and research. Range of Writing  CCSS.ELA-Literacy.CCRA.W.10 Write routinely over extended time frames (time for research, reflection, and revision) and shorter time frames (a single sitting or a day or two) for a range of tasks, purposes, and audiences.Common Core State Standards for English Language Arts & Literacy in History/Social Studies, Science, and Technical Subjects. N.p.: Common Core Sta
  • Reading Strategies What Good & Struggling Readers do During Reading Good Readers: Struggling Readers:  Pay attention to meaning/are  Overattend to individual able to identify key information. words/are often unable to make  Monitor comprehension while meaning. reading.  Do not monitor comprehension  Stop and use ―fix-up‖ strategies. while reading.  Visualize while reading.  Are unaware of ―fix-up‖ strategies.‖  Make inferences.  Are unable to visualize while  Make connections both inside reading. and outside of the text.  Cannot make inferences.  Have a high tolerance for ambiguity  Are unable to make connections, both inside and  Ask questions of the text. outside of the text.  Are active and engaged.  Do not ask questions of the text.  Are passive and unengaged.Gallagher, Kelly, and Richard L. Allington. Readicide: How Schools Are Killing Reading and What You Can Do aboutIt. Portland, Me.: Stenhouse, 2009. Print. Page 103
  • Fix-It Strategies & Sticky Note Ideas • Argue with the author • Evaluate the author’s • Ask about the author ideas • Ask questions • Examine the text structure • ―Chunk‖ the text • Highlight area of • Comment confusion • Consider how the time • Make connections to frame influenced the books author • Make connections to • Consider the author’s films intended audience • Make connections to • Consider the author’s personal experience purpose • Make connections to • Draw conclusions real-world events • ParaphraseGallagher, Kelly, and Richard L. Allington. Readicide: How Schools Are Killing Reading and What You Can Do about It. Portland, Me.:Stenhouse, 2009. Print. Page 103 • Prediction
  • Highlighting Ideas Main ideas & supporting details Author bias Counter arguments Use of literary devices Facts & statistics Parts of paragraph Effective/Ineffective arguments Arguments & supporting claims Text/quotations to use in research papers Explicit/Implicit information Essential vocabulary
  • Methods of IncreasingCritical Thinking• Self-monitoring: “Focused instruction can teach students how to consider their own understandings of a text and learn how to proceed when their understanding fails‖ (Bereiter and Bird, 1985).• Interpretation and Analysis: “A successful program of literacy education enables students to dissect, deconstruct, and re-construct texts as they engage in meaning making‖ (Newmann, King, & Rigdon, 1997).• Multi-disciplinary: “Critical thinking takes slightly different form in each discipline, and effective instruction for adolescent literacy helps students develop capacities for critical thinking in each discipline‖ (Greenleaf et al.,2001).• Technology: “Many adolescents are drawn to technology, and incorporating technology into instruction can increase motivation at the same time that it enhances adolescent literacy by fostering student engagement‖ (Merchant, 2001).Publication. NTCE Principles of Adolescent Literacy Reform. National Council of Teachers of English, Apr. 2006. Web. 29 Aug. 2010. <http://www.ncte.org/library/NCTEFiles/Resources/Positions/Adol-Lit-Brief.pdf>.
  • Diigo Toolbar Buttons Bookmark Highlight Comment (using toolbar button) Read Later Sticky Note (right click on text)
  • In the Gale Databases: Make sure you use the Bookmark this Document Link
  • Learn from our mistakes Check your computers ahead of time – depending on how things are set up by your tech department, you may or may not be able to install browser extensions. In databases, use the ―share‖ tool to share the article to your Diigo account then open the article from ―My Library‖ in Diigo to annotate or highlight. If the database article that you bookmarked won’t open, try opening up/logging into the database in another tab to authenticate your session. You can’t highlight or sticky note PDF documents on the Web. However, you can bookmark them and add page comments (comments appear on the side instead of attached to a specific location