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RTI intervention slide presetation
 

RTI intervention slide presetation

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  • Remind participants that during Read and Comprehend, students will be using this path of connected comprehension through the modes of instruction detailed in the gradual release of responsibility ACTIVITY: Tell participants that you will now model a think aloud, think along, and think together. YOU WILL NEED PREPARE THE DEMO BASED ON YOUR GRADE LEVEL!!! USE THE THEME FROM THE COMMITTEE SAMPLER (THIS IS THE THEME FROM THE PREVIEW BOOK). GRADES K-2 ONLY Think Aloud and Think Along Use the Shared Reading Book to model both the Think Aloud and Think Along. Explain that you will be modeling both a think aloud and think along from this one selection; but in the real sequence of instruction, the students will have already been exposed to the strategy with the modeled reading by receiving a think aloud in the modeled reading. During the modeled reading the teacher is simply “modeling” and exposing the students to the strategy during the think aloud. When moving in to Shared Reading the strategy is explicitly introduced through a Think Aloud and then Students are invited to “Think Along” with the Teacher. Use the teachers notes from the shared reading (Lesson 4) to model the Think Aloud and Think Along. Think Together Next, discuss the think together portion. This happens during interactive reading. The teacher first engages the class in a “think along” on portions of the selection and then asks the students to read parts of the story together while participating in a “think together”. Do NOT model this, simple explain what would happen. Use Lesson 9 to support you in your planning for this. GRADES 3-5 ONLY Think Aloud and Think Along Use the Shared Reading Story to model both the Think Aloud and Think Along. Explain that you will be modeling both a think aloud and think along from this one selection; but in the real sequence of instruction, the students will have already been exposed to the strategy with the modeled reading by receiving a think aloud in the modeled reading. During the modeled reading the teacher is simply “modeling” and exposing the students to the strategy during the think aloud. When moving in to Shared Reading the strategy is explicitly introduced through a Think Aloud and then Students are invited to “Think Along” with the Teacher. Use the teachers notes from the shared reading (Lesson 3) to model the Think Aloud and Think Along. Think Together Next discuss the think together portion. This happens during interactive reading. The teacher first engages the class in a “think along” on portions of the selection (Lesson 4) and then asks the students to read parts of the story together while participating in a “think together” ( Lesson 5). Do NOT model this part, use both Lesson 4 and 5 to help you explain.
  • Explain that during Interactive Reading these are the techniques students will use. (This is in their Learning log on page 4) Briefly share what each of these techniques entail using the notes below. 1. Read, Cover, Remember, Retell Technique: Partners alternate reading only as much text as their hand can cover, covering the text with their hand, and then retelling the contents of the text to their partner. 2. Say Something Technique: Students are asked to take turns reading a section of text, covering it up, and then saying something about it to their partner. This differs from Read, Cover, Remember, Retell in that what the student says to their partner can be more than a straight retell of the contents – it can be any thought or idea they have in response to the text. 3. Partner Jigsaw Technique: This technique is particularly applicable to nonfiction selections such as articles that can be easily divided into sections. Partners are each assigned a specific section of text to read. Then partners debrief with another set of partners in order to learn about the parts of the selection they did not read. 4. Two-Word Technique: Partners read a selection together. Then they both use a sticky note to write only two words that reflect their thinking about the text. Children then take turns reading their words to their partner, explaining why they chose the words they did and how the words relate to the selection or to their own lives. 5. Reverse Think-Aloud Technique: One partner follows along silently while the other partner reads aloud. The student following along selects a point in the text to stop the other student and ask a question about what he or she is thinking about the text at that moment. Partners then reverse roles.
  • Ask participants to read the quote to themselves. Explain that a test does not tell us anything. It is the evaluation of that test that tells us what a student can and can not do If needed: Give example of “A” or “B” – on a report card. A “B” tells us only that a student did well. It does not tell us what things the student is doing well and what things the student still needs to work on in order to get an “A”. Only the evaluation of the assessments that the student took and looking at what they did well and what they need to work on will tell use what this student needs to move to an A. Assessment drives our instruction to save us time. If we look at exactly what the student’s need we can pinpoint our instruction (tailor it). If we don’t we “spin our wheels” all year “guessing” what they might need and then usually finding out they didn’t need it or they weren’t ready for it so we have to keep teaching it over and over again, which takes time Again -Spend time to save time – spend time giving the assessments in the beginning to save time the rest of the year. Literacy by Design has several assessments that are easy to assess and provide valuable information that allows you to evaluate how your students are doing and were they need to continue to work.
  • Skills by Student – This section allows the teacher to see individual students and how they are progressing with the skills tested. Explain that this is a useful tool for grouping students for guided reading. Point out the Instructional Reading Level column. Explain that READS records the level by READS level. To correlate this level to your level of choice you can use the Rigby READS Reading Level Correlation chart. Activity: Using the Correlation Chart Have participants pull out the Small Group Reading Appendix. Have participants turn to page A19 Explain that this is the correlation chart that helps them correlate the READS level to the Literacy by Design level. Tell participants we will practice using the chart. Ask them to find Elizabeth Allison. What is her Instructional Reading Level? (Kindergarten) What level would that be equivalent to a Literacy by Design? (B) Try the next child, Meg Andrews. What is her Instructional Reading Level? (3-2) What level would this be equivalent to Literacy by Design? (O). Explain that what is probably the easiest to do is to first convert the instructional level to Literacy by Design level. Tell them that they will try that now. We have done the first two together, have them get into partners and convert the rest of the classroom by writing the letter out to the side of the sheet. Allow about 5 min. When they are done, have them now use the grouping sheet in the Learning Log on page 1 to group the students by level. (use the next slides to show them an example)

RTI intervention slide presetation RTI intervention slide presetation Presentation Transcript