NICNE Advertising Presentation

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  • Today we will cover the Customer Life Cycle, how non-profits are unique, why it’s important to advertise, how to allocate your budget, and tactics for implementing your marketing strategy.
  • Today we will cover the Customer Life Cycle, how non-profits are unique, why it’s important to advertise, how to allocate your budget, and tactics for implementing your marketing strategy.
  • Today we will cover the Customer Life Cycle, how non-profits are unique, why it’s important to advertise, how to allocate your budget, and tactics for implementing your marketing strategy.
  • Today we will cover the Customer Life Cycle, how non-profits are unique, why it’s important to advertise, how to allocate your budget, and tactics for implementing your marketing strategy.
  • Today we will cover the Customer Life Cycle, how non-profits are unique, why it’s important to advertise, how to allocate your budget, and tactics for implementing your marketing strategy.
  • First up, let’s go over the Customer Life Cycle. It is important to understand how your brand interacts with your target audience.

    The Customer Life Cycle describe the progression of steps a customer goes through when considering, purchasing, using and maintaining loyalty to a product or service.

    Some people have never heard of you, others are raving fans and still others are not happy with you.

    Here are the generally accepted levels within the Customer Life Cycle:

    Awareness - they’ve maybe heard of you, vaguely
    Interest - they’ve heard of you and maybe visited your website. No purchases.
    Action - they’ve made a single purchase/donation
    Evaluation - They form opinions on whether or not your product or service met their needs.
    Advocacy - They are fans of the brand. They purchase frequently and tell their friends about your brand.

    No single marketing tool can be used to move people through the cycle but some can be a catalyst to move them from one part of the cycle to another.

    For example, raising awareness can be done through traditional media - moving someone to the advocacy level can be accomplished using social media because they already have shown a willingness to hear your message.

    Your marketing strategy should include solutions based on who you’re targeting, where they are in the customer life cycle and how to reach them to move them closer to the brand advocate level.
  • First up, let’s go over the Customer Life Cycle. It is important to understand how your brand interacts with your target audience.

    The Customer Life Cycle describe the progression of steps a customer goes through when considering, purchasing, using and maintaining loyalty to a product or service.

    Some people have never heard of you, others are raving fans and still others are not happy with you.

    Here are the generally accepted levels within the Customer Life Cycle:

    Awareness - they’ve maybe heard of you, vaguely
    Interest - they’ve heard of you and maybe visited your website. No purchases.
    Action - they’ve made a single purchase/donation
    Evaluation - They form opinions on whether or not your product or service met their needs.
    Advocacy - They are fans of the brand. They purchase frequently and tell their friends about your brand.

    No single marketing tool can be used to move people through the cycle but some can be a catalyst to move them from one part of the cycle to another.

    For example, raising awareness can be done through traditional media - moving someone to the advocacy level can be accomplished using social media because they already have shown a willingness to hear your message.

    Your marketing strategy should include solutions based on who you’re targeting, where they are in the customer life cycle and how to reach them to move them closer to the brand advocate level.
  • First up, let’s go over the Customer Life Cycle. It is important to understand how your brand interacts with your target audience.

    The Customer Life Cycle describe the progression of steps a customer goes through when considering, purchasing, using and maintaining loyalty to a product or service.

    Some people have never heard of you, others are raving fans and still others are not happy with you.

    Here are the generally accepted levels within the Customer Life Cycle:

    Awareness - they’ve maybe heard of you, vaguely
    Interest - they’ve heard of you and maybe visited your website. No purchases.
    Action - they’ve made a single purchase/donation
    Evaluation - They form opinions on whether or not your product or service met their needs.
    Advocacy - They are fans of the brand. They purchase frequently and tell their friends about your brand.

    No single marketing tool can be used to move people through the cycle but some can be a catalyst to move them from one part of the cycle to another.

    For example, raising awareness can be done through traditional media - moving someone to the advocacy level can be accomplished using social media because they already have shown a willingness to hear your message.

    Your marketing strategy should include solutions based on who you’re targeting, where they are in the customer life cycle and how to reach them to move them closer to the brand advocate level.
  • First up, let’s go over the Customer Life Cycle. It is important to understand how your brand interacts with your target audience.

    The Customer Life Cycle describe the progression of steps a customer goes through when considering, purchasing, using and maintaining loyalty to a product or service.

    Some people have never heard of you, others are raving fans and still others are not happy with you.

    Here are the generally accepted levels within the Customer Life Cycle:

    Awareness - they’ve maybe heard of you, vaguely
    Interest - they’ve heard of you and maybe visited your website. No purchases.
    Action - they’ve made a single purchase/donation
    Evaluation - They form opinions on whether or not your product or service met their needs.
    Advocacy - They are fans of the brand. They purchase frequently and tell their friends about your brand.

    No single marketing tool can be used to move people through the cycle but some can be a catalyst to move them from one part of the cycle to another.

    For example, raising awareness can be done through traditional media - moving someone to the advocacy level can be accomplished using social media because they already have shown a willingness to hear your message.

    Your marketing strategy should include solutions based on who you’re targeting, where they are in the customer life cycle and how to reach them to move them closer to the brand advocate level.
  • First up, let’s go over the Customer Life Cycle. It is important to understand how your brand interacts with your target audience.

    The Customer Life Cycle describe the progression of steps a customer goes through when considering, purchasing, using and maintaining loyalty to a product or service.

    Some people have never heard of you, others are raving fans and still others are not happy with you.

    Here are the generally accepted levels within the Customer Life Cycle:

    Awareness - they’ve maybe heard of you, vaguely
    Interest - they’ve heard of you and maybe visited your website. No purchases.
    Action - they’ve made a single purchase/donation
    Evaluation - They form opinions on whether or not your product or service met their needs.
    Advocacy - They are fans of the brand. They purchase frequently and tell their friends about your brand.

    No single marketing tool can be used to move people through the cycle but some can be a catalyst to move them from one part of the cycle to another.

    For example, raising awareness can be done through traditional media - moving someone to the advocacy level can be accomplished using social media because they already have shown a willingness to hear your message.

    Your marketing strategy should include solutions based on who you’re targeting, where they are in the customer life cycle and how to reach them to move them closer to the brand advocate level.
  • First up, let’s go over the Customer Life Cycle. It is important to understand how your brand interacts with your target audience.

    The Customer Life Cycle describe the progression of steps a customer goes through when considering, purchasing, using and maintaining loyalty to a product or service.

    Some people have never heard of you, others are raving fans and still others are not happy with you.

    Here are the generally accepted levels within the Customer Life Cycle:

    Awareness - they’ve maybe heard of you, vaguely
    Interest - they’ve heard of you and maybe visited your website. No purchases.
    Action - they’ve made a single purchase/donation
    Evaluation - They form opinions on whether or not your product or service met their needs.
    Advocacy - They are fans of the brand. They purchase frequently and tell their friends about your brand.

    No single marketing tool can be used to move people through the cycle but some can be a catalyst to move them from one part of the cycle to another.

    For example, raising awareness can be done through traditional media - moving someone to the advocacy level can be accomplished using social media because they already have shown a willingness to hear your message.

    Your marketing strategy should include solutions based on who you’re targeting, where they are in the customer life cycle and how to reach them to move them closer to the brand advocate level.
  • First up, let’s go over the Customer Life Cycle. It is important to understand how your brand interacts with your target audience.

    The Customer Life Cycle describe the progression of steps a customer goes through when considering, purchasing, using and maintaining loyalty to a product or service.

    Some people have never heard of you, others are raving fans and still others are not happy with you.

    Here are the generally accepted levels within the Customer Life Cycle:

    Awareness - they’ve maybe heard of you, vaguely
    Interest - they’ve heard of you and maybe visited your website. No purchases.
    Action - they’ve made a single purchase/donation
    Evaluation - They form opinions on whether or not your product or service met their needs.
    Advocacy - They are fans of the brand. They purchase frequently and tell their friends about your brand.

    No single marketing tool can be used to move people through the cycle but some can be a catalyst to move them from one part of the cycle to another.

    For example, raising awareness can be done through traditional media - moving someone to the advocacy level can be accomplished using social media because they already have shown a willingness to hear your message.

    Your marketing strategy should include solutions based on who you’re targeting, where they are in the customer life cycle and how to reach them to move them closer to the brand advocate level.
  • First up, let’s go over the Customer Life Cycle. It is important to understand how your brand interacts with your target audience.

    The Customer Life Cycle describe the progression of steps a customer goes through when considering, purchasing, using and maintaining loyalty to a product or service.

    Some people have never heard of you, others are raving fans and still others are not happy with you.

    Here are the generally accepted levels within the Customer Life Cycle:

    Awareness - they’ve maybe heard of you, vaguely
    Interest - they’ve heard of you and maybe visited your website. No purchases.
    Action - they’ve made a single purchase/donation
    Evaluation - They form opinions on whether or not your product or service met their needs.
    Advocacy - They are fans of the brand. They purchase frequently and tell their friends about your brand.

    No single marketing tool can be used to move people through the cycle but some can be a catalyst to move them from one part of the cycle to another.

    For example, raising awareness can be done through traditional media - moving someone to the advocacy level can be accomplished using social media because they already have shown a willingness to hear your message.

    Your marketing strategy should include solutions based on who you’re targeting, where they are in the customer life cycle and how to reach them to move them closer to the brand advocate level.
  • First up, let’s go over the Customer Life Cycle. It is important to understand how your brand interacts with your target audience.

    The Customer Life Cycle describe the progression of steps a customer goes through when considering, purchasing, using and maintaining loyalty to a product or service.

    Some people have never heard of you, others are raving fans and still others are not happy with you.

    Here are the generally accepted levels within the Customer Life Cycle:

    Awareness - they’ve maybe heard of you, vaguely
    Interest - they’ve heard of you and maybe visited your website. No purchases.
    Action - they’ve made a single purchase/donation
    Evaluation - They form opinions on whether or not your product or service met their needs.
    Advocacy - They are fans of the brand. They purchase frequently and tell their friends about your brand.

    No single marketing tool can be used to move people through the cycle but some can be a catalyst to move them from one part of the cycle to another.

    For example, raising awareness can be done through traditional media - moving someone to the advocacy level can be accomplished using social media because they already have shown a willingness to hear your message.

    Your marketing strategy should include solutions based on who you’re targeting, where they are in the customer life cycle and how to reach them to move them closer to the brand advocate level.
  • First up, let’s go over the Customer Life Cycle. It is important to understand how your brand interacts with your target audience.

    The Customer Life Cycle describe the progression of steps a customer goes through when considering, purchasing, using and maintaining loyalty to a product or service.

    Some people have never heard of you, others are raving fans and still others are not happy with you.

    Here are the generally accepted levels within the Customer Life Cycle:

    Awareness - they’ve maybe heard of you, vaguely
    Interest - they’ve heard of you and maybe visited your website. No purchases.
    Action - they’ve made a single purchase/donation
    Evaluation - They form opinions on whether or not your product or service met their needs.
    Advocacy - They are fans of the brand. They purchase frequently and tell their friends about your brand.

    No single marketing tool can be used to move people through the cycle but some can be a catalyst to move them from one part of the cycle to another.

    For example, raising awareness can be done through traditional media - moving someone to the advocacy level can be accomplished using social media because they already have shown a willingness to hear your message.

    Your marketing strategy should include solutions based on who you’re targeting, where they are in the customer life cycle and how to reach them to move them closer to the brand advocate level.
  • First up, let’s go over the Customer Life Cycle. It is important to understand how your brand interacts with your target audience.

    The Customer Life Cycle describe the progression of steps a customer goes through when considering, purchasing, using and maintaining loyalty to a product or service.

    Some people have never heard of you, others are raving fans and still others are not happy with you.

    Here are the generally accepted levels within the Customer Life Cycle:

    Awareness - they’ve maybe heard of you, vaguely
    Interest - they’ve heard of you and maybe visited your website. No purchases.
    Action - they’ve made a single purchase/donation
    Evaluation - They form opinions on whether or not your product or service met their needs.
    Advocacy - They are fans of the brand. They purchase frequently and tell their friends about your brand.

    No single marketing tool can be used to move people through the cycle but some can be a catalyst to move them from one part of the cycle to another.

    For example, raising awareness can be done through traditional media - moving someone to the advocacy level can be accomplished using social media because they already have shown a willingness to hear your message.

    Your marketing strategy should include solutions based on who you’re targeting, where they are in the customer life cycle and how to reach them to move them closer to the brand advocate level.
  • As a Non-profit you are unique in several ways:

    You have a narrow targeted audience - donors, those who use your services (consumers) , volunteers drawn to your particular cause - and each need a specific message and call to action.
    You are also unique because you have a compelling message. This cannot be said for a company selling widgets. You represent a cause or service that needs attention in the community.

    Your audience is often motivated, this also makes you unique. Your targeted audience is often highly motivated to work with you for the greater good.

    Now add to the mix the fact that most non-profits are understaffed and underfunded and it becomes very troublesome to figure out how to market your organization effectively. These key elements that make you unique can serve as both challenges and opportunities when it comes to getting the most bang for you advertising buck.
  • As a Non-profit you are unique in several ways:

    You have a narrow targeted audience - donors, those who use your services (consumers) , volunteers drawn to your particular cause - and each need a specific message and call to action.
    You are also unique because you have a compelling message. This cannot be said for a company selling widgets. You represent a cause or service that needs attention in the community.

    Your audience is often motivated, this also makes you unique. Your targeted audience is often highly motivated to work with you for the greater good.

    Now add to the mix the fact that most non-profits are understaffed and underfunded and it becomes very troublesome to figure out how to market your organization effectively. These key elements that make you unique can serve as both challenges and opportunities when it comes to getting the most bang for you advertising buck.
  • As a Non-profit you are unique in several ways:

    You have a narrow targeted audience - donors, those who use your services (consumers) , volunteers drawn to your particular cause - and each need a specific message and call to action.
    You are also unique because you have a compelling message. This cannot be said for a company selling widgets. You represent a cause or service that needs attention in the community.

    Your audience is often motivated, this also makes you unique. Your targeted audience is often highly motivated to work with you for the greater good.

    Now add to the mix the fact that most non-profits are understaffed and underfunded and it becomes very troublesome to figure out how to market your organization effectively. These key elements that make you unique can serve as both challenges and opportunities when it comes to getting the most bang for you advertising buck.
  • As a Non-profit you are unique in several ways:

    You have a narrow targeted audience - donors, those who use your services (consumers) , volunteers drawn to your particular cause - and each need a specific message and call to action.
    You are also unique because you have a compelling message. This cannot be said for a company selling widgets. You represent a cause or service that needs attention in the community.

    Your audience is often motivated, this also makes you unique. Your targeted audience is often highly motivated to work with you for the greater good.

    Now add to the mix the fact that most non-profits are understaffed and underfunded and it becomes very troublesome to figure out how to market your organization effectively. These key elements that make you unique can serve as both challenges and opportunities when it comes to getting the most bang for you advertising buck.
  • The first question that most non-profit organizations ask is, “How much of my budget should I be spending on advertising?” or the ever popular, “Should I be spending any money at all on advertising?” First, you must understand why advertising is important.

    There is a perception that non-profits shouldn’t spend money on advertising -it should be free. Well this is definitely not a best practice. Imagine if McDonalds or Wal-Mart had not spent any money on advertising - we wouldn’t even know about them. Ads create awareness and help fuel desire in consumers.

    Dan Pallotta of the Harvard Business Review wrote, “People have a natural desire to be altruistic. When that desire is stimulated, we will give more money to urgent causes — possibly much more” in a 2009 blog post. He argues that if big brand were only allowed to get their advertising donated their ads, running at two in the morning (which is often the case with donated ad time), we would not know of their product or desire to purchase it.

    Palotta quotes John Kenneth Galbraith, an economist, who says, “a broad empirical relationship exists between what is spent on production and what is spent synthesizing the desires for that production.” The more time one spends with a brand and interacts with it the more time and money they are willing to invest.
  • The first question that most non-profit organizations ask is, “How much of my budget should I be spending on advertising?” or the ever popular, “Should I be spending any money at all on advertising?” First, you must understand why advertising is important.

    There is a perception that non-profits shouldn’t spend money on advertising -it should be free. Well this is definitely not a best practice. Imagine if McDonalds or Wal-Mart had not spent any money on advertising - we wouldn’t even know about them. Ads create awareness and help fuel desire in consumers.

    Dan Pallotta of the Harvard Business Review wrote, “People have a natural desire to be altruistic. When that desire is stimulated, we will give more money to urgent causes — possibly much more” in a 2009 blog post. He argues that if big brand were only allowed to get their advertising donated their ads, running at two in the morning (which is often the case with donated ad time), we would not know of their product or desire to purchase it.

    Palotta quotes John Kenneth Galbraith, an economist, who says, “a broad empirical relationship exists between what is spent on production and what is spent synthesizing the desires for that production.” The more time one spends with a brand and interacts with it the more time and money they are willing to invest.
  • The first question that most non-profit organizations ask is, “How much of my budget should I be spending on advertising?” or the ever popular, “Should I be spending any money at all on advertising?” First, you must understand why advertising is important.

    There is a perception that non-profits shouldn’t spend money on advertising -it should be free. Well this is definitely not a best practice. Imagine if McDonalds or Wal-Mart had not spent any money on advertising - we wouldn’t even know about them. Ads create awareness and help fuel desire in consumers.

    Dan Pallotta of the Harvard Business Review wrote, “People have a natural desire to be altruistic. When that desire is stimulated, we will give more money to urgent causes — possibly much more” in a 2009 blog post. He argues that if big brand were only allowed to get their advertising donated their ads, running at two in the morning (which is often the case with donated ad time), we would not know of their product or desire to purchase it.

    Palotta quotes John Kenneth Galbraith, an economist, who says, “a broad empirical relationship exists between what is spent on production and what is spent synthesizing the desires for that production.” The more time one spends with a brand and interacts with it the more time and money they are willing to invest.
  • The first question that most non-profit organizations ask is, “How much of my budget should I be spending on advertising?” or the ever popular, “Should I be spending any money at all on advertising?” First, you must understand why advertising is important.

    There is a perception that non-profits shouldn’t spend money on advertising -it should be free. Well this is definitely not a best practice. Imagine if McDonalds or Wal-Mart had not spent any money on advertising - we wouldn’t even know about them. Ads create awareness and help fuel desire in consumers.

    Dan Pallotta of the Harvard Business Review wrote, “People have a natural desire to be altruistic. When that desire is stimulated, we will give more money to urgent causes — possibly much more” in a 2009 blog post. He argues that if big brand were only allowed to get their advertising donated their ads, running at two in the morning (which is often the case with donated ad time), we would not know of their product or desire to purchase it.

    Palotta quotes John Kenneth Galbraith, an economist, who says, “a broad empirical relationship exists between what is spent on production and what is spent synthesizing the desires for that production.” The more time one spends with a brand and interacts with it the more time and money they are willing to invest.
  • Now that it is clear how important it is to advertise and market your business, we can get back to the questions of how much of your budget should be spent on advertising. We believe that the amount of budget spent on advertising depends on the size of your organization as well as the size of your budget (which are usually mutually exclusive). This also depends on your goals for the year. In the for-profit world it is typical to spend 10-20% of projected gross revenues on marketing communications and advertising.

    But, in the non-profit world this is not as clear with the dual bottom line of both dollars and people. The advantage of developing a budget based on your organization’s finances is that it’s organic - it grows as your organization grows. If you are just starting out or launching a new program, service or advocacy campaign, your budget may be higher than if you are just funding on-going programs for the year. Take a look at your goals for the year and allocate a comfortable amount to your advertising budget. If you are newer you may have more trouble figuring out exactly how much you will need, so it will be imperative to track what you are doing along the way and how effective it is and adjust accordingly throughout the year - this will help you plan for the future as well. If you are an older organization you need to look at past budgets, etc. and try to find a realistic number. Another key point it to look at how many organizations, if any, you are competing with. This will help you to determine how aggressively you need to be.

    The average allocation is from 0-10% of your annual organizational budget. Advocacy organizations tend to allocate a higher percentage of their budgets to communications since their work is communication-based. You can then break it down further to the percent of the allocated budget that you expect to spend on various activities - purchasing ads, producing the ads, special events coordination, etc.

    Also note that advertising can also include donor communications (annual reports, fundrasing collateral, etc.) Traditional "advertising" and donor communications are nearly the same thing in most non-profits

  • Now that it is clear how important it is to advertise and market your business, we can get back to the questions of how much of your budget should be spent on advertising. We believe that the amount of budget spent on advertising depends on the size of your organization as well as the size of your budget (which are usually mutually exclusive). This also depends on your goals for the year. In the for-profit world it is typical to spend 10-20% of projected gross revenues on marketing communications and advertising.

    But, in the non-profit world this is not as clear with the dual bottom line of both dollars and people. The advantage of developing a budget based on your organization’s finances is that it’s organic - it grows as your organization grows. If you are just starting out or launching a new program, service or advocacy campaign, your budget may be higher than if you are just funding on-going programs for the year. Take a look at your goals for the year and allocate a comfortable amount to your advertising budget. If you are newer you may have more trouble figuring out exactly how much you will need, so it will be imperative to track what you are doing along the way and how effective it is and adjust accordingly throughout the year - this will help you plan for the future as well. If you are an older organization you need to look at past budgets, etc. and try to find a realistic number. Another key point it to look at how many organizations, if any, you are competing with. This will help you to determine how aggressively you need to be.

    The average allocation is from 0-10% of your annual organizational budget. Advocacy organizations tend to allocate a higher percentage of their budgets to communications since their work is communication-based. You can then break it down further to the percent of the allocated budget that you expect to spend on various activities - purchasing ads, producing the ads, special events coordination, etc.

    Also note that advertising can also include donor communications (annual reports, fundrasing collateral, etc.) Traditional "advertising" and donor communications are nearly the same thing in most non-profits

  • Now that it is clear how important it is to advertise and market your business, we can get back to the questions of how much of your budget should be spent on advertising. We believe that the amount of budget spent on advertising depends on the size of your organization as well as the size of your budget (which are usually mutually exclusive). This also depends on your goals for the year. In the for-profit world it is typical to spend 10-20% of projected gross revenues on marketing communications and advertising.

    But, in the non-profit world this is not as clear with the dual bottom line of both dollars and people. The advantage of developing a budget based on your organization’s finances is that it’s organic - it grows as your organization grows. If you are just starting out or launching a new program, service or advocacy campaign, your budget may be higher than if you are just funding on-going programs for the year. Take a look at your goals for the year and allocate a comfortable amount to your advertising budget. If you are newer you may have more trouble figuring out exactly how much you will need, so it will be imperative to track what you are doing along the way and how effective it is and adjust accordingly throughout the year - this will help you plan for the future as well. If you are an older organization you need to look at past budgets, etc. and try to find a realistic number. Another key point it to look at how many organizations, if any, you are competing with. This will help you to determine how aggressively you need to be.

    The average allocation is from 0-10% of your annual organizational budget. Advocacy organizations tend to allocate a higher percentage of their budgets to communications since their work is communication-based. You can then break it down further to the percent of the allocated budget that you expect to spend on various activities - purchasing ads, producing the ads, special events coordination, etc.

    Also note that advertising can also include donor communications (annual reports, fundrasing collateral, etc.) Traditional "advertising" and donor communications are nearly the same thing in most non-profits

  • Now that it is clear how important it is to advertise and market your business, we can get back to the questions of how much of your budget should be spent on advertising. We believe that the amount of budget spent on advertising depends on the size of your organization as well as the size of your budget (which are usually mutually exclusive). This also depends on your goals for the year. In the for-profit world it is typical to spend 10-20% of projected gross revenues on marketing communications and advertising.

    But, in the non-profit world this is not as clear with the dual bottom line of both dollars and people. The advantage of developing a budget based on your organization’s finances is that it’s organic - it grows as your organization grows. If you are just starting out or launching a new program, service or advocacy campaign, your budget may be higher than if you are just funding on-going programs for the year. Take a look at your goals for the year and allocate a comfortable amount to your advertising budget. If you are newer you may have more trouble figuring out exactly how much you will need, so it will be imperative to track what you are doing along the way and how effective it is and adjust accordingly throughout the year - this will help you plan for the future as well. If you are an older organization you need to look at past budgets, etc. and try to find a realistic number. Another key point it to look at how many organizations, if any, you are competing with. This will help you to determine how aggressively you need to be.

    The average allocation is from 0-10% of your annual organizational budget. Advocacy organizations tend to allocate a higher percentage of their budgets to communications since their work is communication-based. You can then break it down further to the percent of the allocated budget that you expect to spend on various activities - purchasing ads, producing the ads, special events coordination, etc.

    Also note that advertising can also include donor communications (annual reports, fundrasing collateral, etc.) Traditional "advertising" and donor communications are nearly the same thing in most non-profits

  • Now that it is clear how important it is to advertise and market your business, we can get back to the questions of how much of your budget should be spent on advertising. We believe that the amount of budget spent on advertising depends on the size of your organization as well as the size of your budget (which are usually mutually exclusive). This also depends on your goals for the year. In the for-profit world it is typical to spend 10-20% of projected gross revenues on marketing communications and advertising.

    But, in the non-profit world this is not as clear with the dual bottom line of both dollars and people. The advantage of developing a budget based on your organization’s finances is that it’s organic - it grows as your organization grows. If you are just starting out or launching a new program, service or advocacy campaign, your budget may be higher than if you are just funding on-going programs for the year. Take a look at your goals for the year and allocate a comfortable amount to your advertising budget. If you are newer you may have more trouble figuring out exactly how much you will need, so it will be imperative to track what you are doing along the way and how effective it is and adjust accordingly throughout the year - this will help you plan for the future as well. If you are an older organization you need to look at past budgets, etc. and try to find a realistic number. Another key point it to look at how many organizations, if any, you are competing with. This will help you to determine how aggressively you need to be.

    The average allocation is from 0-10% of your annual organizational budget. Advocacy organizations tend to allocate a higher percentage of their budgets to communications since their work is communication-based. You can then break it down further to the percent of the allocated budget that you expect to spend on various activities - purchasing ads, producing the ads, special events coordination, etc.

    Also note that advertising can also include donor communications (annual reports, fundrasing collateral, etc.) Traditional "advertising" and donor communications are nearly the same thing in most non-profits

  • It is important to create a detailed marketing plan to help you outline and meet the goals of your organization. And, most importantly, make sure that you track your efforts and measure their effectiveness throughout the year so that you can reevaluate next year and alter your planning in the necessary areas to ensure maximum success. Planning is important for targeting your audience - you can't be on every outlet all the time due to budget and staffing shortages - so target your specific audience using the right media outlets.

    Depending on your efforts there are many ways to track and measure. For example if you have an ad in the newspaper or radio you may want to include a a unique URL so that you can track where people are coming from. You can also use a “How Heard” type questions on your materials. No matter what you do it is important to keep track of what works so that for your next event or next year’s marketing plan you will know how best to allocate your budget.


  • It is important to create a detailed marketing plan to help you outline and meet the goals of your organization. And, most importantly, make sure that you track your efforts and measure their effectiveness throughout the year so that you can reevaluate next year and alter your planning in the necessary areas to ensure maximum success. Planning is important for targeting your audience - you can't be on every outlet all the time due to budget and staffing shortages - so target your specific audience using the right media outlets.

    Depending on your efforts there are many ways to track and measure. For example if you have an ad in the newspaper or radio you may want to include a a unique URL so that you can track where people are coming from. You can also use a “How Heard” type questions on your materials. No matter what you do it is important to keep track of what works so that for your next event or next year’s marketing plan you will know how best to allocate your budget.


  • It is important to create a detailed marketing plan to help you outline and meet the goals of your organization. And, most importantly, make sure that you track your efforts and measure their effectiveness throughout the year so that you can reevaluate next year and alter your planning in the necessary areas to ensure maximum success. Planning is important for targeting your audience - you can't be on every outlet all the time due to budget and staffing shortages - so target your specific audience using the right media outlets.

    Depending on your efforts there are many ways to track and measure. For example if you have an ad in the newspaper or radio you may want to include a a unique URL so that you can track where people are coming from. You can also use a “How Heard” type questions on your materials. No matter what you do it is important to keep track of what works so that for your next event or next year’s marketing plan you will know how best to allocate your budget.


  • Before you can plan the tactics for reaching your goals, you need to know the ways that you can get the most bang for your buck when it comes to advertising. That way you can plan your strategy accordingly.

    There are many things that you can do to leverage your organizations dollars in the most effective way. Most outlets have free or reduced rates for non-profits, so as a first step always be sure to ask for the non-profit rates. Even Google Ad words has a special program for non-profits through their Google Grants program. The Google Grants program empowers non-profits to achieve their goals by helping them promote their websites via advertising on Google. Google ads appear when users search on Google and take users, on-click, to the website being advertised. You can track Google AdWords easily as well as the traffic to your website.

    Most media outlets have special rates for non-profits, but some may not mention if you don’t bring it up.

    Always ask for Bonus. Many media outlets offer non-profits bonus spots or PSA spots with their paid advertising - Buy 2 get 1 free or even sometimes buy 1 get 1 free.

    These are just a few things you can do right up front to make sure that you are getting the best your money can buy. Next, we will go through specifics on public relations, Social Media, Traditional advertising, and some tips on how to plan your special events/fundraisers to optimize your budget.

  • Before you can plan the tactics for reaching your goals, you need to know the ways that you can get the most bang for your buck when it comes to advertising. That way you can plan your strategy accordingly.

    There are many things that you can do to leverage your organizations dollars in the most effective way. Most outlets have free or reduced rates for non-profits, so as a first step always be sure to ask for the non-profit rates. Even Google Ad words has a special program for non-profits through their Google Grants program. The Google Grants program empowers non-profits to achieve their goals by helping them promote their websites via advertising on Google. Google ads appear when users search on Google and take users, on-click, to the website being advertised. You can track Google AdWords easily as well as the traffic to your website.

    Most media outlets have special rates for non-profits, but some may not mention if you don’t bring it up.

    Always ask for Bonus. Many media outlets offer non-profits bonus spots or PSA spots with their paid advertising - Buy 2 get 1 free or even sometimes buy 1 get 1 free.

    These are just a few things you can do right up front to make sure that you are getting the best your money can buy. Next, we will go through specifics on public relations, Social Media, Traditional advertising, and some tips on how to plan your special events/fundraisers to optimize your budget.

  • Before you can plan the tactics for reaching your goals, you need to know the ways that you can get the most bang for your buck when it comes to advertising. That way you can plan your strategy accordingly.

    There are many things that you can do to leverage your organizations dollars in the most effective way. Most outlets have free or reduced rates for non-profits, so as a first step always be sure to ask for the non-profit rates. Even Google Ad words has a special program for non-profits through their Google Grants program. The Google Grants program empowers non-profits to achieve their goals by helping them promote their websites via advertising on Google. Google ads appear when users search on Google and take users, on-click, to the website being advertised. You can track Google AdWords easily as well as the traffic to your website.

    Most media outlets have special rates for non-profits, but some may not mention if you don’t bring it up.

    Always ask for Bonus. Many media outlets offer non-profits bonus spots or PSA spots with their paid advertising - Buy 2 get 1 free or even sometimes buy 1 get 1 free.

    These are just a few things you can do right up front to make sure that you are getting the best your money can buy. Next, we will go through specifics on public relations, Social Media, Traditional advertising, and some tips on how to plan your special events/fundraisers to optimize your budget.

  • Before you can plan the tactics for reaching your goals, you need to know the ways that you can get the most bang for your buck when it comes to advertising. That way you can plan your strategy accordingly.

    There are many things that you can do to leverage your organizations dollars in the most effective way. Most outlets have free or reduced rates for non-profits, so as a first step always be sure to ask for the non-profit rates. Even Google Ad words has a special program for non-profits through their Google Grants program. The Google Grants program empowers non-profits to achieve their goals by helping them promote their websites via advertising on Google. Google ads appear when users search on Google and take users, on-click, to the website being advertised. You can track Google AdWords easily as well as the traffic to your website.

    Most media outlets have special rates for non-profits, but some may not mention if you don’t bring it up.

    Always ask for Bonus. Many media outlets offer non-profits bonus spots or PSA spots with their paid advertising - Buy 2 get 1 free or even sometimes buy 1 get 1 free.

    These are just a few things you can do right up front to make sure that you are getting the best your money can buy. Next, we will go through specifics on public relations, Social Media, Traditional advertising, and some tips on how to plan your special events/fundraisers to optimize your budget.

  • Before you can plan the tactics for reaching your goals, you need to know the ways that you can get the most bang for your buck when it comes to advertising. That way you can plan your strategy accordingly.

    There are many things that you can do to leverage your organizations dollars in the most effective way. Most outlets have free or reduced rates for non-profits, so as a first step always be sure to ask for the non-profit rates. Even Google Ad words has a special program for non-profits through their Google Grants program. The Google Grants program empowers non-profits to achieve their goals by helping them promote their websites via advertising on Google. Google ads appear when users search on Google and take users, on-click, to the website being advertised. You can track Google AdWords easily as well as the traffic to your website.

    Most media outlets have special rates for non-profits, but some may not mention if you don’t bring it up.

    Always ask for Bonus. Many media outlets offer non-profits bonus spots or PSA spots with their paid advertising - Buy 2 get 1 free or even sometimes buy 1 get 1 free.

    These are just a few things you can do right up front to make sure that you are getting the best your money can buy. Next, we will go through specifics on public relations, Social Media, Traditional advertising, and some tips on how to plan your special events/fundraisers to optimize your budget.

  • Before you can plan the tactics for reaching your goals, you need to know the ways that you can get the most bang for your buck when it comes to advertising. That way you can plan your strategy accordingly.

    There are many things that you can do to leverage your organizations dollars in the most effective way. Most outlets have free or reduced rates for non-profits, so as a first step always be sure to ask for the non-profit rates. Even Google Ad words has a special program for non-profits through their Google Grants program. The Google Grants program empowers non-profits to achieve their goals by helping them promote their websites via advertising on Google. Google ads appear when users search on Google and take users, on-click, to the website being advertised. You can track Google AdWords easily as well as the traffic to your website.

    Most media outlets have special rates for non-profits, but some may not mention if you don’t bring it up.

    Always ask for Bonus. Many media outlets offer non-profits bonus spots or PSA spots with their paid advertising - Buy 2 get 1 free or even sometimes buy 1 get 1 free.

    These are just a few things you can do right up front to make sure that you are getting the best your money can buy. Next, we will go through specifics on public relations, Social Media, Traditional advertising, and some tips on how to plan your special events/fundraisers to optimize your budget.

  • Before you can plan the tactics for reaching your goals, you need to know the ways that you can get the most bang for your buck when it comes to advertising. That way you can plan your strategy accordingly.

    There are many things that you can do to leverage your organizations dollars in the most effective way. Most outlets have free or reduced rates for non-profits, so as a first step always be sure to ask for the non-profit rates. Even Google Ad words has a special program for non-profits through their Google Grants program. The Google Grants program empowers non-profits to achieve their goals by helping them promote their websites via advertising on Google. Google ads appear when users search on Google and take users, on-click, to the website being advertised. You can track Google AdWords easily as well as the traffic to your website.

    Most media outlets have special rates for non-profits, but some may not mention if you don’t bring it up.

    Always ask for Bonus. Many media outlets offer non-profits bonus spots or PSA spots with their paid advertising - Buy 2 get 1 free or even sometimes buy 1 get 1 free.

    These are just a few things you can do right up front to make sure that you are getting the best your money can buy. Next, we will go through specifics on public relations, Social Media, Traditional advertising, and some tips on how to plan your special events/fundraisers to optimize your budget.

  • Before you can plan the tactics for reaching your goals, you need to know the ways that you can get the most bang for your buck when it comes to advertising. That way you can plan your strategy accordingly.

    There are many things that you can do to leverage your organizations dollars in the most effective way. Most outlets have free or reduced rates for non-profits, so as a first step always be sure to ask for the non-profit rates. Even Google Ad words has a special program for non-profits through their Google Grants program. The Google Grants program empowers non-profits to achieve their goals by helping them promote their websites via advertising on Google. Google ads appear when users search on Google and take users, on-click, to the website being advertised. You can track Google AdWords easily as well as the traffic to your website.

    Most media outlets have special rates for non-profits, but some may not mention if you don’t bring it up.

    Always ask for Bonus. Many media outlets offer non-profits bonus spots or PSA spots with their paid advertising - Buy 2 get 1 free or even sometimes buy 1 get 1 free.

    These are just a few things you can do right up front to make sure that you are getting the best your money can buy. Next, we will go through specifics on public relations, Social Media, Traditional advertising, and some tips on how to plan your special events/fundraisers to optimize your budget.

  • Before you can plan the tactics for reaching your goals, you need to know the ways that you can get the most bang for your buck when it comes to advertising. That way you can plan your strategy accordingly.

    There are many things that you can do to leverage your organizations dollars in the most effective way. Most outlets have free or reduced rates for non-profits, so as a first step always be sure to ask for the non-profit rates. Even Google Ad words has a special program for non-profits through their Google Grants program. The Google Grants program empowers non-profits to achieve their goals by helping them promote their websites via advertising on Google. Google ads appear when users search on Google and take users, on-click, to the website being advertised. You can track Google AdWords easily as well as the traffic to your website.

    Most media outlets have special rates for non-profits, but some may not mention if you don’t bring it up.

    Always ask for Bonus. Many media outlets offer non-profits bonus spots or PSA spots with their paid advertising - Buy 2 get 1 free or even sometimes buy 1 get 1 free.

    These are just a few things you can do right up front to make sure that you are getting the best your money can buy. Next, we will go through specifics on public relations, Social Media, Traditional advertising, and some tips on how to plan your special events/fundraisers to optimize your budget.

  • Public relations is often overlooked, but it can be one of the best free tools around to draw needed attention toward your organization or special event. The most important thing to remember about public relations is that you need to create a newsworthy angle for your event. For non-profits this is usually not extremely difficult since you are serving a purpose or need in the community. Keep in mind that your ribbon cutting, photo op, anniversary is news to you, but might not be to the general public - find a way to localize your story...tie it to a local, regional or national news topic.

    How is it covered?
    It is important for you to understand how the local media operate. Figure out who covers what types of stories - beats, and make sure you are sending your press release to the appropriate reporters. Read through the paper/watch the news to get a feel for who covers each beat and try to develop a relationship with them - ask them how they prefer to receive information and get to know their assistants. Make friends with the morning anchors - possibly invite them to join your board of directors. Keep in mind that if you are personable and do well during on air interviews (or have a spokesperson who is) it will be easier for you to find opportunities. (use Grace/Kristan example - meaning that she gets asked to come on because she is very personable - nothing to do with being non-profit just an example of being a good interviewee)

    It is also useful to understand how the TV newsroom works - story meetings at about 10am, talk with assignment editors the day of your event/announcement, reporters come in about 2 pm, typically best to have news conferences after 10 or before 3pm, educate the photog if that’s all you have - answer your own questions because he or she usually is under-prepared.

    Radio locally is very understaffed. They rarely show up for a news conference - phone-in interviews can work, but in-studio interviews work better. Try to schedule an interview sometime the week before your event.

    Don’t send your news releases too early - it’s good to send it a few weeks in advance so they can plan, but then send it again about a week or week and a half before the event. Also, if you take some photos you could send them along with a release after the event.

    When dealing with the media it is important to understand how they work and create a situation that makes it easy for them to obtain the needed information and footage.

    Example - In the past we have had clients hold events during the lunch hour. There is a lot going on during the lunch hour and it is important to remember that anytime the news media shows up for your event or new conference they are usually in a hurry. They may show up right before and want an interview - most likely because they cannot stay the entire time. Or they may show up late and want interviews afterwards. It is important for you to get your message out no only to the audience at the event, but to those that were unable to attend as well. If doing an interview will cause your event to start a few minutes late - it is most likely a fair trade-off.

    Next up...New Media

  • Public relations is often overlooked, but it can be one of the best free tools around to draw needed attention toward your organization or special event. The most important thing to remember about public relations is that you need to create a newsworthy angle for your event. For non-profits this is usually not extremely difficult since you are serving a purpose or need in the community. Keep in mind that your ribbon cutting, photo op, anniversary is news to you, but might not be to the general public - find a way to localize your story...tie it to a local, regional or national news topic.

    How is it covered?
    It is important for you to understand how the local media operate. Figure out who covers what types of stories - beats, and make sure you are sending your press release to the appropriate reporters. Read through the paper/watch the news to get a feel for who covers each beat and try to develop a relationship with them - ask them how they prefer to receive information and get to know their assistants. Make friends with the morning anchors - possibly invite them to join your board of directors. Keep in mind that if you are personable and do well during on air interviews (or have a spokesperson who is) it will be easier for you to find opportunities. (use Grace/Kristan example - meaning that she gets asked to come on because she is very personable - nothing to do with being non-profit just an example of being a good interviewee)

    It is also useful to understand how the TV newsroom works - story meetings at about 10am, talk with assignment editors the day of your event/announcement, reporters come in about 2 pm, typically best to have news conferences after 10 or before 3pm, educate the photog if that’s all you have - answer your own questions because he or she usually is under-prepared.

    Radio locally is very understaffed. They rarely show up for a news conference - phone-in interviews can work, but in-studio interviews work better. Try to schedule an interview sometime the week before your event.

    Don’t send your news releases too early - it’s good to send it a few weeks in advance so they can plan, but then send it again about a week or week and a half before the event. Also, if you take some photos you could send them along with a release after the event.

    When dealing with the media it is important to understand how they work and create a situation that makes it easy for them to obtain the needed information and footage.

    Example - In the past we have had clients hold events during the lunch hour. There is a lot going on during the lunch hour and it is important to remember that anytime the news media shows up for your event or new conference they are usually in a hurry. They may show up right before and want an interview - most likely because they cannot stay the entire time. Or they may show up late and want interviews afterwards. It is important for you to get your message out no only to the audience at the event, but to those that were unable to attend as well. If doing an interview will cause your event to start a few minutes late - it is most likely a fair trade-off.

    Next up...New Media

  • Public relations is often overlooked, but it can be one of the best free tools around to draw needed attention toward your organization or special event. The most important thing to remember about public relations is that you need to create a newsworthy angle for your event. For non-profits this is usually not extremely difficult since you are serving a purpose or need in the community. Keep in mind that your ribbon cutting, photo op, anniversary is news to you, but might not be to the general public - find a way to localize your story...tie it to a local, regional or national news topic.

    How is it covered?
    It is important for you to understand how the local media operate. Figure out who covers what types of stories - beats, and make sure you are sending your press release to the appropriate reporters. Read through the paper/watch the news to get a feel for who covers each beat and try to develop a relationship with them - ask them how they prefer to receive information and get to know their assistants. Make friends with the morning anchors - possibly invite them to join your board of directors. Keep in mind that if you are personable and do well during on air interviews (or have a spokesperson who is) it will be easier for you to find opportunities. (use Grace/Kristan example - meaning that she gets asked to come on because she is very personable - nothing to do with being non-profit just an example of being a good interviewee)

    It is also useful to understand how the TV newsroom works - story meetings at about 10am, talk with assignment editors the day of your event/announcement, reporters come in about 2 pm, typically best to have news conferences after 10 or before 3pm, educate the photog if that’s all you have - answer your own questions because he or she usually is under-prepared.

    Radio locally is very understaffed. They rarely show up for a news conference - phone-in interviews can work, but in-studio interviews work better. Try to schedule an interview sometime the week before your event.

    Don’t send your news releases too early - it’s good to send it a few weeks in advance so they can plan, but then send it again about a week or week and a half before the event. Also, if you take some photos you could send them along with a release after the event.

    When dealing with the media it is important to understand how they work and create a situation that makes it easy for them to obtain the needed information and footage.

    Example - In the past we have had clients hold events during the lunch hour. There is a lot going on during the lunch hour and it is important to remember that anytime the news media shows up for your event or new conference they are usually in a hurry. They may show up right before and want an interview - most likely because they cannot stay the entire time. Or they may show up late and want interviews afterwards. It is important for you to get your message out no only to the audience at the event, but to those that were unable to attend as well. If doing an interview will cause your event to start a few minutes late - it is most likely a fair trade-off.

    Next up...New Media

  • Public relations is often overlooked, but it can be one of the best free tools around to draw needed attention toward your organization or special event. The most important thing to remember about public relations is that you need to create a newsworthy angle for your event. For non-profits this is usually not extremely difficult since you are serving a purpose or need in the community. Keep in mind that your ribbon cutting, photo op, anniversary is news to you, but might not be to the general public - find a way to localize your story...tie it to a local, regional or national news topic.

    How is it covered?
    It is important for you to understand how the local media operate. Figure out who covers what types of stories - beats, and make sure you are sending your press release to the appropriate reporters. Read through the paper/watch the news to get a feel for who covers each beat and try to develop a relationship with them - ask them how they prefer to receive information and get to know their assistants. Make friends with the morning anchors - possibly invite them to join your board of directors. Keep in mind that if you are personable and do well during on air interviews (or have a spokesperson who is) it will be easier for you to find opportunities. (use Grace/Kristan example - meaning that she gets asked to come on because she is very personable - nothing to do with being non-profit just an example of being a good interviewee)

    It is also useful to understand how the TV newsroom works - story meetings at about 10am, talk with assignment editors the day of your event/announcement, reporters come in about 2 pm, typically best to have news conferences after 10 or before 3pm, educate the photog if that’s all you have - answer your own questions because he or she usually is under-prepared.

    Radio locally is very understaffed. They rarely show up for a news conference - phone-in interviews can work, but in-studio interviews work better. Try to schedule an interview sometime the week before your event.

    Don’t send your news releases too early - it’s good to send it a few weeks in advance so they can plan, but then send it again about a week or week and a half before the event. Also, if you take some photos you could send them along with a release after the event.

    When dealing with the media it is important to understand how they work and create a situation that makes it easy for them to obtain the needed information and footage.

    Example - In the past we have had clients hold events during the lunch hour. There is a lot going on during the lunch hour and it is important to remember that anytime the news media shows up for your event or new conference they are usually in a hurry. They may show up right before and want an interview - most likely because they cannot stay the entire time. Or they may show up late and want interviews afterwards. It is important for you to get your message out no only to the audience at the event, but to those that were unable to attend as well. If doing an interview will cause your event to start a few minutes late - it is most likely a fair trade-off.

    Next up...New Media

  • Public relations is often overlooked, but it can be one of the best free tools around to draw needed attention toward your organization or special event. The most important thing to remember about public relations is that you need to create a newsworthy angle for your event. For non-profits this is usually not extremely difficult since you are serving a purpose or need in the community. Keep in mind that your ribbon cutting, photo op, anniversary is news to you, but might not be to the general public - find a way to localize your story...tie it to a local, regional or national news topic.

    How is it covered?
    It is important for you to understand how the local media operate. Figure out who covers what types of stories - beats, and make sure you are sending your press release to the appropriate reporters. Read through the paper/watch the news to get a feel for who covers each beat and try to develop a relationship with them - ask them how they prefer to receive information and get to know their assistants. Make friends with the morning anchors - possibly invite them to join your board of directors. Keep in mind that if you are personable and do well during on air interviews (or have a spokesperson who is) it will be easier for you to find opportunities. (use Grace/Kristan example - meaning that she gets asked to come on because she is very personable - nothing to do with being non-profit just an example of being a good interviewee)

    It is also useful to understand how the TV newsroom works - story meetings at about 10am, talk with assignment editors the day of your event/announcement, reporters come in about 2 pm, typically best to have news conferences after 10 or before 3pm, educate the photog if that’s all you have - answer your own questions because he or she usually is under-prepared.

    Radio locally is very understaffed. They rarely show up for a news conference - phone-in interviews can work, but in-studio interviews work better. Try to schedule an interview sometime the week before your event.

    Don’t send your news releases too early - it’s good to send it a few weeks in advance so they can plan, but then send it again about a week or week and a half before the event. Also, if you take some photos you could send them along with a release after the event.

    When dealing with the media it is important to understand how they work and create a situation that makes it easy for them to obtain the needed information and footage.

    Example - In the past we have had clients hold events during the lunch hour. There is a lot going on during the lunch hour and it is important to remember that anytime the news media shows up for your event or new conference they are usually in a hurry. They may show up right before and want an interview - most likely because they cannot stay the entire time. Or they may show up late and want interviews afterwards. It is important for you to get your message out no only to the audience at the event, but to those that were unable to attend as well. If doing an interview will cause your event to start a few minutes late - it is most likely a fair trade-off.

    Next up...New Media

  • Text campaigns can be a great way to solicit donations. A recent successful example would be the Red Cross Haiti text campaign. It made it extremely easy for people to donate $10 to Haiti relief just by texting Haiti to a short number. This then charges it to their cell phone bill. According to The Chronicle of Philanthropy the Red Cross was able to raise $29-million in just 15 days with the their text campaign for Haiti relief. mGive.com/TextDonations is the site of one company that helped the Red Cross implement this campaign.

    Another great way to keep in touch with your audience is through e-mail newsletters and e-mail blasts. You can update donors and volunteers on upcoming opportunities as well as consumers on your program offerings, etc. Good Tracking.

    When it comes to social media there are tons of outlets - Facebook, Twitter, MySpace, LinkedIn, FourSquare, Flickr, YouTube, Friendster, and hundreds more. Today, we will look briefly at Facebook and Twitter.
  • Text campaigns can be a great way to solicit donations. A recent successful example would be the Red Cross Haiti text campaign. It made it extremely easy for people to donate $10 to Haiti relief just by texting Haiti to a short number. This then charges it to their cell phone bill. According to The Chronicle of Philanthropy the Red Cross was able to raise $29-million in just 15 days with the their text campaign for Haiti relief. mGive.com/TextDonations is the site of one company that helped the Red Cross implement this campaign.

    Another great way to keep in touch with your audience is through e-mail newsletters and e-mail blasts. You can update donors and volunteers on upcoming opportunities as well as consumers on your program offerings, etc. Good Tracking.

    When it comes to social media there are tons of outlets - Facebook, Twitter, MySpace, LinkedIn, FourSquare, Flickr, YouTube, Friendster, and hundreds more. Today, we will look briefly at Facebook and Twitter.
  • Text campaigns can be a great way to solicit donations. A recent successful example would be the Red Cross Haiti text campaign. It made it extremely easy for people to donate $10 to Haiti relief just by texting Haiti to a short number. This then charges it to their cell phone bill. According to The Chronicle of Philanthropy the Red Cross was able to raise $29-million in just 15 days with the their text campaign for Haiti relief. mGive.com/TextDonations is the site of one company that helped the Red Cross implement this campaign.

    Another great way to keep in touch with your audience is through e-mail newsletters and e-mail blasts. You can update donors and volunteers on upcoming opportunities as well as consumers on your program offerings, etc. Good Tracking.

    When it comes to social media there are tons of outlets - Facebook, Twitter, MySpace, LinkedIn, FourSquare, Flickr, YouTube, Friendster, and hundreds more. Today, we will look briefly at Facebook and Twitter.
  • Text campaigns can be a great way to solicit donations. A recent successful example would be the Red Cross Haiti text campaign. It made it extremely easy for people to donate $10 to Haiti relief just by texting Haiti to a short number. This then charges it to their cell phone bill. According to The Chronicle of Philanthropy the Red Cross was able to raise $29-million in just 15 days with the their text campaign for Haiti relief. mGive.com/TextDonations is the site of one company that helped the Red Cross implement this campaign.

    Another great way to keep in touch with your audience is through e-mail newsletters and e-mail blasts. You can update donors and volunteers on upcoming opportunities as well as consumers on your program offerings, etc. Good Tracking.

    When it comes to social media there are tons of outlets - Facebook, Twitter, MySpace, LinkedIn, FourSquare, Flickr, YouTube, Friendster, and hundreds more. Today, we will look briefly at Facebook and Twitter.
  • Text campaigns can be a great way to solicit donations. A recent successful example would be the Red Cross Haiti text campaign. It made it extremely easy for people to donate $10 to Haiti relief just by texting Haiti to a short number. This then charges it to their cell phone bill. According to The Chronicle of Philanthropy the Red Cross was able to raise $29-million in just 15 days with the their text campaign for Haiti relief. mGive.com/TextDonations is the site of one company that helped the Red Cross implement this campaign.

    Another great way to keep in touch with your audience is through e-mail newsletters and e-mail blasts. You can update donors and volunteers on upcoming opportunities as well as consumers on your program offerings, etc. Good Tracking.

    When it comes to social media there are tons of outlets - Facebook, Twitter, MySpace, LinkedIn, FourSquare, Flickr, YouTube, Friendster, and hundreds more. Today, we will look briefly at Facebook and Twitter.
  • Text campaigns can be a great way to solicit donations. A recent successful example would be the Red Cross Haiti text campaign. It made it extremely easy for people to donate $10 to Haiti relief just by texting Haiti to a short number. This then charges it to their cell phone bill. According to The Chronicle of Philanthropy the Red Cross was able to raise $29-million in just 15 days with the their text campaign for Haiti relief. mGive.com/TextDonations is the site of one company that helped the Red Cross implement this campaign.

    Another great way to keep in touch with your audience is through e-mail newsletters and e-mail blasts. You can update donors and volunteers on upcoming opportunities as well as consumers on your program offerings, etc. Good Tracking.

    When it comes to social media there are tons of outlets - Facebook, Twitter, MySpace, LinkedIn, FourSquare, Flickr, YouTube, Friendster, and hundreds more. Today, we will look briefly at Facebook and Twitter.
  • Text campaigns can be a great way to solicit donations. A recent successful example would be the Red Cross Haiti text campaign. It made it extremely easy for people to donate $10 to Haiti relief just by texting Haiti to a short number. This then charges it to their cell phone bill. According to The Chronicle of Philanthropy the Red Cross was able to raise $29-million in just 15 days with the their text campaign for Haiti relief. mGive.com/TextDonations is the site of one company that helped the Red Cross implement this campaign.

    Another great way to keep in touch with your audience is through e-mail newsletters and e-mail blasts. You can update donors and volunteers on upcoming opportunities as well as consumers on your program offerings, etc. Good Tracking.

    When it comes to social media there are tons of outlets - Facebook, Twitter, MySpace, LinkedIn, FourSquare, Flickr, YouTube, Friendster, and hundreds more. Today, we will look briefly at Facebook and Twitter.
  • Text campaigns can be a great way to solicit donations. A recent successful example would be the Red Cross Haiti text campaign. It made it extremely easy for people to donate $10 to Haiti relief just by texting Haiti to a short number. This then charges it to their cell phone bill. According to The Chronicle of Philanthropy the Red Cross was able to raise $29-million in just 15 days with the their text campaign for Haiti relief. mGive.com/TextDonations is the site of one company that helped the Red Cross implement this campaign.

    Another great way to keep in touch with your audience is through e-mail newsletters and e-mail blasts. You can update donors and volunteers on upcoming opportunities as well as consumers on your program offerings, etc. Good Tracking.

    When it comes to social media there are tons of outlets - Facebook, Twitter, MySpace, LinkedIn, FourSquare, Flickr, YouTube, Friendster, and hundreds more. Today, we will look briefly at Facebook and Twitter.
  • Facebook is useful for organizations that want to have a multi-level conversation with their donors and supporters, particularly as you struggle to get coverage in the local media and advertising budgets shrink.

    It allows you to form groups, tag photos, post links and videos.

    It also is the fastest growing site out there - who’s noticed that their mother or grandmother has joined? Or maybe you heard complaints from your kids when you did? Facebook recently hit the 400 million user mark, so if you think people aren't on it - you're wrong. If you are asking yourself if they will interact with your brand - 20 million people becomes fans of pages everyday.

    There are conversations, events, and networking opportunities that are only happening there; if you’re not on Facebook, you’re missing these opportunities.

    <click to show screenshot>

    Facebook also has a very popular application called "Causes" which lets you do fund- and friend-raising online. The application takes a modest - less than 5% fee - for credit-card based transactions that support your cause. Here you'll see the Susan G. Komen Breast Cancer Foundation. They have a half-million supporters and have raised nearly $60,000 on the Facebook page.



  • Facebook is useful for organizations that want to have a multi-level conversation with their donors and supporters, particularly as you struggle to get coverage in the local media and advertising budgets shrink.

    It allows you to form groups, tag photos, post links and videos.

    It also is the fastest growing site out there - who’s noticed that their mother or grandmother has joined? Or maybe you heard complaints from your kids when you did? Facebook recently hit the 400 million user mark, so if you think people aren't on it - you're wrong. If you are asking yourself if they will interact with your brand - 20 million people becomes fans of pages everyday.

    There are conversations, events, and networking opportunities that are only happening there; if you’re not on Facebook, you’re missing these opportunities.

    <click to show screenshot>

    Facebook also has a very popular application called "Causes" which lets you do fund- and friend-raising online. The application takes a modest - less than 5% fee - for credit-card based transactions that support your cause. Here you'll see the Susan G. Komen Breast Cancer Foundation. They have a half-million supporters and have raised nearly $60,000 on the Facebook page.



  • Facebook is useful for organizations that want to have a multi-level conversation with their donors and supporters, particularly as you struggle to get coverage in the local media and advertising budgets shrink.

    It allows you to form groups, tag photos, post links and videos.

    It also is the fastest growing site out there - who’s noticed that their mother or grandmother has joined? Or maybe you heard complaints from your kids when you did? Facebook recently hit the 400 million user mark, so if you think people aren't on it - you're wrong. If you are asking yourself if they will interact with your brand - 20 million people becomes fans of pages everyday.

    There are conversations, events, and networking opportunities that are only happening there; if you’re not on Facebook, you’re missing these opportunities.

    <click to show screenshot>

    Facebook also has a very popular application called "Causes" which lets you do fund- and friend-raising online. The application takes a modest - less than 5% fee - for credit-card based transactions that support your cause. Here you'll see the Susan G. Komen Breast Cancer Foundation. They have a half-million supporters and have raised nearly $60,000 on the Facebook page.



  • Facebook is useful for organizations that want to have a multi-level conversation with their donors and supporters, particularly as you struggle to get coverage in the local media and advertising budgets shrink.

    It allows you to form groups, tag photos, post links and videos.

    It also is the fastest growing site out there - who’s noticed that their mother or grandmother has joined? Or maybe you heard complaints from your kids when you did? Facebook recently hit the 400 million user mark, so if you think people aren't on it - you're wrong. If you are asking yourself if they will interact with your brand - 20 million people becomes fans of pages everyday.

    There are conversations, events, and networking opportunities that are only happening there; if you’re not on Facebook, you’re missing these opportunities.

    <click to show screenshot>

    Facebook also has a very popular application called "Causes" which lets you do fund- and friend-raising online. The application takes a modest - less than 5% fee - for credit-card based transactions that support your cause. Here you'll see the Susan G. Komen Breast Cancer Foundation. They have a half-million supporters and have raised nearly $60,000 on the Facebook page.



  • Twitter helps you stay connected to your customers, industry, networking contacts, media contacts...whomever you choose!


  • Twitter helps you stay connected to your donors, volunteers, industry, networking contacts, media contacts...whomever you choose!

    It’s immediate. Great for real-time feedback and to quickly share information.

    It’s also good for disseminating information and upcoming opportunities to your target audiences or finding out about the latest in your industry....and positioning yourself as an expert in your particular industry.

    Can also be used for crisis communications.

    Twitter gives your constituents direct access to employees and a way to contribute to your company.
    It also gives you first-hand feedback and the opportunity to change a service blunder into a win for your organization.

    Follow the leaders in your industry and share content that positions you as an expert yourself.


  • Twitter helps you stay connected to your donors, volunteers, industry, networking contacts, media contacts...whomever you choose!

    It’s immediate. Great for real-time feedback and to quickly share information.

    It’s also good for disseminating information and upcoming opportunities to your target audiences or finding out about the latest in your industry....and positioning yourself as an expert in your particular industry.

    Can also be used for crisis communications.

    Twitter gives your constituents direct access to employees and a way to contribute to your company.
    It also gives you first-hand feedback and the opportunity to change a service blunder into a win for your organization.

    Follow the leaders in your industry and share content that positions you as an expert yourself.


  • Twitter helps you stay connected to your donors, volunteers, industry, networking contacts, media contacts...whomever you choose!

    It’s immediate. Great for real-time feedback and to quickly share information.

    It’s also good for disseminating information and upcoming opportunities to your target audiences or finding out about the latest in your industry....and positioning yourself as an expert in your particular industry.

    Can also be used for crisis communications.

    Twitter gives your constituents direct access to employees and a way to contribute to your company.
    It also gives you first-hand feedback and the opportunity to change a service blunder into a win for your organization.

    Follow the leaders in your industry and share content that positions you as an expert yourself.


  • Twitter helps you stay connected to your donors, volunteers, industry, networking contacts, media contacts...whomever you choose!

    It’s immediate. Great for real-time feedback and to quickly share information.

    It’s also good for disseminating information and upcoming opportunities to your target audiences or finding out about the latest in your industry....and positioning yourself as an expert in your particular industry.

    Can also be used for crisis communications.

    Twitter gives your constituents direct access to employees and a way to contribute to your company.
    It also gives you first-hand feedback and the opportunity to change a service blunder into a win for your organization.

    Follow the leaders in your industry and share content that positions you as an expert yourself.


  • Twitter helps you stay connected to your donors, volunteers, industry, networking contacts, media contacts...whomever you choose!

    It’s immediate. Great for real-time feedback and to quickly share information.

    It’s also good for disseminating information and upcoming opportunities to your target audiences or finding out about the latest in your industry....and positioning yourself as an expert in your particular industry.

    Can also be used for crisis communications.

    Twitter gives your constituents direct access to employees and a way to contribute to your company.
    It also gives you first-hand feedback and the opportunity to change a service blunder into a win for your organization.

    Follow the leaders in your industry and share content that positions you as an expert yourself.


  • Twitter helps you stay connected to your donors, volunteers, industry, networking contacts, media contacts...whomever you choose!

    It’s immediate. Great for real-time feedback and to quickly share information.

    It’s also good for disseminating information and upcoming opportunities to your target audiences or finding out about the latest in your industry....and positioning yourself as an expert in your particular industry.

    Can also be used for crisis communications.

    Twitter gives your constituents direct access to employees and a way to contribute to your company.
    It also gives you first-hand feedback and the opportunity to change a service blunder into a win for your organization.

    Follow the leaders in your industry and share content that positions you as an expert yourself.


  • When planning your event you should try to find a local news or radio personality to emcee your event this will help create extra coverage leading up to your event as well as familiarity with the audience.

    Media Sponsorships can also be very beneficial, but there are also some cons:

    Pros - can be excellent coverage (WTVO with Great Home Giveaway for long-time partnership and lost of deliverables) vs. another non-profit I’ve worked with who doesn’t ask for a media contract so has no idea of how much because they actually get.
    Con- If you have one station involved, others may not cover the event.
  • When planning your event you should try to find a local news or radio personality to emcee your event this will help create extra coverage leading up to your event as well as familiarity with the audience.

    Media Sponsorships can also be very beneficial, but there are also some cons:

    Pros - can be excellent coverage (WTVO with Great Home Giveaway for long-time partnership and lost of deliverables) vs. another non-profit I’ve worked with who doesn’t ask for a media contract so has no idea of how much because they actually get.
    Con- If you have one station involved, others may not cover the event.
  • When planning your event you should try to find a local news or radio personality to emcee your event this will help create extra coverage leading up to your event as well as familiarity with the audience.

    Media Sponsorships can also be very beneficial, but there are also some cons:

    Pros - can be excellent coverage (WTVO with Great Home Giveaway for long-time partnership and lost of deliverables) vs. another non-profit I’ve worked with who doesn’t ask for a media contract so has no idea of how much because they actually get.
    Con- If you have one station involved, others may not cover the event.
  • When planning your event you should try to find a local news or radio personality to emcee your event this will help create extra coverage leading up to your event as well as familiarity with the audience.

    Media Sponsorships can also be very beneficial, but there are also some cons:

    Pros - can be excellent coverage (WTVO with Great Home Giveaway for long-time partnership and lost of deliverables) vs. another non-profit I’ve worked with who doesn’t ask for a media contract so has no idea of how much because they actually get.
    Con- If you have one station involved, others may not cover the event.
  • Strategically your website is the best tool in your arsenal when it comes to marketing. All of your advertising and public relations efforts should drive people to your website. If you only have a few brief opportunities to reach your audience (15 sec on radio) you need to drive them to your website as a call to action - Visit the website and donate, volunteer, etc.

    With that being said you can imagine how important it is to have your website is up-to-date. Often times your audience will spend more time interacting with your brand on your website so the appearance and usability are very important. You also want to make sure that all the links and functionality of your website work and make it easy for people to find information on programs, volunteering, donating to campaigns, signing up for your e-newsletters and more. those who use your services (consumers)

    Ask for more interaction on your site. Post videos and photos and ask your supporters to send photos, comments, etc. If you don't have a "Donate Now" application on your site - add one - as well as applications that allow people to register and pay for events online. This will make it easy for your audience to support your organization.

    For the media add an online newsroom - bios of leaders, compelling stories of people you've helped, an organizational timeline/history, downloadable graphics/logos and photos.
  • Strategically your website is the best tool in your arsenal when it comes to marketing. All of your advertising and public relations efforts should drive people to your website. If you only have a few brief opportunities to reach your audience (15 sec on radio) you need to drive them to your website as a call to action - Visit the website and donate, volunteer, etc.

    With that being said you can imagine how important it is to have your website is up-to-date. Often times your audience will spend more time interacting with your brand on your website so the appearance and usability are very important. You also want to make sure that all the links and functionality of your website work and make it easy for people to find information on programs, volunteering, donating to campaigns, signing up for your e-newsletters and more. those who use your services (consumers)

    Ask for more interaction on your site. Post videos and photos and ask your supporters to send photos, comments, etc. If you don't have a "Donate Now" application on your site - add one - as well as applications that allow people to register and pay for events online. This will make it easy for your audience to support your organization.

    For the media add an online newsroom - bios of leaders, compelling stories of people you've helped, an organizational timeline/history, downloadable graphics/logos and photos.
  • Strategically your website is the best tool in your arsenal when it comes to marketing. All of your advertising and public relations efforts should drive people to your website. If you only have a few brief opportunities to reach your audience (15 sec on radio) you need to drive them to your website as a call to action - Visit the website and donate, volunteer, etc.

    With that being said you can imagine how important it is to have your website is up-to-date. Often times your audience will spend more time interacting with your brand on your website so the appearance and usability are very important. You also want to make sure that all the links and functionality of your website work and make it easy for people to find information on programs, volunteering, donating to campaigns, signing up for your e-newsletters and more. those who use your services (consumers)

    Ask for more interaction on your site. Post videos and photos and ask your supporters to send photos, comments, etc. If you don't have a "Donate Now" application on your site - add one - as well as applications that allow people to register and pay for events online. This will make it easy for your audience to support your organization.

    For the media add an online newsroom - bios of leaders, compelling stories of people you've helped, an organizational timeline/history, downloadable graphics/logos and photos.
  • Strategically your website is the best tool in your arsenal when it comes to marketing. All of your advertising and public relations efforts should drive people to your website. If you only have a few brief opportunities to reach your audience (15 sec on radio) you need to drive them to your website as a call to action - Visit the website and donate, volunteer, etc.

    With that being said you can imagine how important it is to have your website is up-to-date. Often times your audience will spend more time interacting with your brand on your website so the appearance and usability are very important. You also want to make sure that all the links and functionality of your website work and make it easy for people to find information on programs, volunteering, donating to campaigns, signing up for your e-newsletters and more. those who use your services (consumers)

    Ask for more interaction on your site. Post videos and photos and ask your supporters to send photos, comments, etc. If you don't have a "Donate Now" application on your site - add one - as well as applications that allow people to register and pay for events online. This will make it easy for your audience to support your organization.

    For the media add an online newsroom - bios of leaders, compelling stories of people you've helped, an organizational timeline/history, downloadable graphics/logos and photos.
  • Strategically your website is the best tool in your arsenal when it comes to marketing. All of your advertising and public relations efforts should drive people to your website. If you only have a few brief opportunities to reach your audience (15 sec on radio) you need to drive them to your website as a call to action - Visit the website and donate, volunteer, etc.

    With that being said you can imagine how important it is to have your website is up-to-date. Often times your audience will spend more time interacting with your brand on your website so the appearance and usability are very important. You also want to make sure that all the links and functionality of your website work and make it easy for people to find information on programs, volunteering, donating to campaigns, signing up for your e-newsletters and more. those who use your services (consumers)

    Ask for more interaction on your site. Post videos and photos and ask your supporters to send photos, comments, etc. If you don't have a "Donate Now" application on your site - add one - as well as applications that allow people to register and pay for events online. This will make it easy for your audience to support your organization.

    For the media add an online newsroom - bios of leaders, compelling stories of people you've helped, an organizational timeline/history, downloadable graphics/logos and photos.
  • Here Prairie State Legal Services features news and a calendar of events, they even have an intranet that employees use to keep in touch, retrieve valuable information, get news from president and CEO, as well as connect with other departments and locations. They also have special areas targeting volunteers, consumers, and a function for donations.
  • Here Prairie State Legal Services features news and a calendar of events, they even have an intranet that employees use to keep in touch, retrieve valuable information, get news from president and CEO, as well as connect with other departments and locations. They also have special areas targeting volunteers, consumers, and a function for donations.
  • Here Prairie State Legal Services features news and a calendar of events, they even have an intranet that employees use to keep in touch, retrieve valuable information, get news from president and CEO, as well as connect with other departments and locations. They also have special areas targeting volunteers, consumers, and a function for donations.
  • Here Prairie State Legal Services features news and a calendar of events, they even have an intranet that employees use to keep in touch, retrieve valuable information, get news from president and CEO, as well as connect with other departments and locations. They also have special areas targeting volunteers, consumers, and a function for donations.
  • Here Prairie State Legal Services features news and a calendar of events, they even have an intranet that employees use to keep in touch, retrieve valuable information, get news from president and CEO, as well as connect with other departments and locations. They also have special areas targeting volunteers, consumers, and a function for donations.
  • Here Prairie State Legal Services features news and a calendar of events, they even have an intranet that employees use to keep in touch, retrieve valuable information, get news from president and CEO, as well as connect with other departments and locations. They also have special areas targeting volunteers, consumers, and a function for donations.
  • Here Prairie State Legal Services features news and a calendar of events, they even have an intranet that employees use to keep in touch, retrieve valuable information, get news from president and CEO, as well as connect with other departments and locations. They also have special areas targeting volunteers, consumers, and a function for donations.
  • Here Prairie State Legal Services features news and a calendar of events, they even have an intranet that employees use to keep in touch, retrieve valuable information, get news from president and CEO, as well as connect with other departments and locations. They also have special areas targeting volunteers, consumers, and a function for donations.
  • Here Prairie State Legal Services features news and a calendar of events, they even have an intranet that employees use to keep in touch, retrieve valuable information, get news from president and CEO, as well as connect with other departments and locations. They also have special areas targeting volunteers, consumers, and a function for donations.
  • Here Prairie State Legal Services features news and a calendar of events, they even have an intranet that employees use to keep in touch, retrieve valuable information, get news from president and CEO, as well as connect with other departments and locations. They also have special areas targeting volunteers, consumers, and a function for donations.
  • Here Prairie State Legal Services features news and a calendar of events, they even have an intranet that employees use to keep in touch, retrieve valuable information, get news from president and CEO, as well as connect with other departments and locations. They also have special areas targeting volunteers, consumers, and a function for donations.
  • The Golden Apple Foundation of Rockford found a donor to pay for their website, which offers news, upcoming events information, a sign-up for their newsletter and a donation functionality.
  • The Golden Apple Foundation of Rockford found a donor to pay for their website, which offers news, upcoming events information, a sign-up for their newsletter and a donation functionality.
  • The Golden Apple Foundation of Rockford found a donor to pay for their website, which offers news, upcoming events information, a sign-up for their newsletter and a donation functionality.
  • The Golden Apple Foundation of Rockford found a donor to pay for their website, which offers news, upcoming events information, a sign-up for their newsletter and a donation functionality.
  • The Golden Apple Foundation of Rockford found a donor to pay for their website, which offers news, upcoming events information, a sign-up for their newsletter and a donation functionality.
  • The Golden Apple Foundation of Rockford found a donor to pay for their website, which offers news, upcoming events information, a sign-up for their newsletter and a donation functionality.
  • The Golden Apple Foundation of Rockford found a donor to pay for their website, which offers news, upcoming events information, a sign-up for their newsletter and a donation functionality.
  • The advertising tips I have outlined today will help you to allocate your budget in the most effective way and give you a great strategy for getting out your compelling message. Focus on a recipient of your services who has a good story and make your advertising human. Then, you can carry it through to website, direct mail, newsletters, etc. By keeping your marketing focused with careful planning you will have effective marketing and alleviate some of the pressure on staff by utilizing time spent on advertising tasks.

    Remember to track and measure your efforts so that you can optimize your marketing efforts in the future.
  • The advertising tips I have outlined today will help you to allocate your budget in the most effective way and give you a great strategy for getting out your compelling message. Focus on a recipient of your services who has a good story and make your advertising human. Then, you can carry it through to website, direct mail, newsletters, etc. By keeping your marketing focused with careful planning you will have effective marketing and alleviate some of the pressure on staff by utilizing time spent on advertising tasks.

    Remember to track and measure your efforts so that you can optimize your marketing efforts in the future.
  • The advertising tips I have outlined today will help you to allocate your budget in the most effective way and give you a great strategy for getting out your compelling message. Focus on a recipient of your services who has a good story and make your advertising human. Then, you can carry it through to website, direct mail, newsletters, etc. By keeping your marketing focused with careful planning you will have effective marketing and alleviate some of the pressure on staff by utilizing time spent on advertising tasks.

    Remember to track and measure your efforts so that you can optimize your marketing efforts in the future.
  • Thank you for your time! I will now address any questions that you may have...
  • NICNE Advertising Presentation

    1. 1. Getting the Most Bang for Your Advertising Buck Pam Maher Principal KMK Media Group www.kmkmedia.com | Facebook.com/kmkmedia | twitter.com/kmkmedia
    2. 2. TODAY’S PRESENTATION www.kmkmedia.com | Facebook.com/kmkmedia | twitter.com/kmkmedia
    3. 3. TODAY’S PRESENTATION • Customer Life Cycle www.kmkmedia.com | Facebook.com/kmkmedia | twitter.com/kmkmedia
    4. 4. TODAY’S PRESENTATION • Customer Life Cycle • Challenges & Opportunities of Non-profits www.kmkmedia.com | Facebook.com/kmkmedia | twitter.com/kmkmedia
    5. 5. TODAY’S PRESENTATION • Customer Life Cycle • Challenges & Opportunities of Non-profits • Why Advertising? www.kmkmedia.com | Facebook.com/kmkmedia | twitter.com/kmkmedia
    6. 6. TODAY’S PRESENTATION • Customer Life Cycle • Challenges & Opportunities of Non-profits • Why Advertising? • Budget www.kmkmedia.com | Facebook.com/kmkmedia | twitter.com/kmkmedia
    7. 7. TODAY’S PRESENTATION • Customer Life Cycle • Challenges & Opportunities of Non-profits • Why Advertising? • Budget • Tactics www.kmkmedia.com | Facebook.com/kmkmedia | twitter.com/kmkmedia
    8. 8. FROM AWARENESS TO ADVOCACY www.kmkmedia.com | Facebook.com/kmkmedia | twitter.com/kmkmedia
    9. 9. FROM AWARENESS TO ADVOCACY Awareness www.kmkmedia.com | Facebook.com/kmkmedia | twitter.com/kmkmedia
    10. 10. FROM AWARENESS TO ADVOCACY Interest Awareness www.kmkmedia.com | Facebook.com/kmkmedia | twitter.com/kmkmedia
    11. 11. FROM AWARENESS TO ADVOCACY Action Interest Awareness www.kmkmedia.com | Facebook.com/kmkmedia | twitter.com/kmkmedia
    12. 12. FROM AWARENESS TO ADVOCACY Evaluation Action Interest Awareness www.kmkmedia.com | Facebook.com/kmkmedia | twitter.com/kmkmedia
    13. 13. FROM AWARENESS TO ADVOCACY Advocacy Evaluation Action Interest Awareness www.kmkmedia.com | Facebook.com/kmkmedia | twitter.com/kmkmedia
    14. 14. FROM AWARENESS TO ADVOCACY Advocacy Evaluation Action Interest Awareness www.kmkmedia.com | Facebook.com/kmkmedia | twitter.com/kmkmedia
    15. 15. NON-PROFITS AND ADVERTISING www.kmkmedia.com | Facebook.com/kmkmedia | twitter.com/kmkmedia
    16. 16. NON-PROFITS AND ADVERTISING Non-profits are unique in several ways: www.kmkmedia.com | Facebook.com/kmkmedia | twitter.com/kmkmedia
    17. 17. NON-PROFITS AND ADVERTISING Non-profits are unique in several ways: • Narrow target audience www.kmkmedia.com | Facebook.com/kmkmedia | twitter.com/kmkmedia
    18. 18. NON-PROFITS AND ADVERTISING Non-profits are unique in several ways: • Narrow target audience • Compelling message www.kmkmedia.com | Facebook.com/kmkmedia | twitter.com/kmkmedia
    19. 19. NON-PROFITS AND ADVERTISING Non-profits are unique in several ways: • Narrow target audience • Compelling message • Understaffed and underfunded www.kmkmedia.com | Facebook.com/kmkmedia | twitter.com/kmkmedia
    20. 20. WHY IS ADVERTISING IMPORTANT? www.kmkmedia.com | Facebook.com/kmkmedia | twitter.com/kmkmedia
    21. 21. WHY IS ADVERTISING IMPORTANT? • Perception that ads should only be donated www.kmkmedia.com | Facebook.com/kmkmedia | twitter.com/kmkmedia
    22. 22. WHY IS ADVERTISING IMPORTANT? • Perception that ads should only be donated • Donated ads are often run at undesirable times www.kmkmedia.com | Facebook.com/kmkmedia | twitter.com/kmkmedia
    23. 23. WHY IS ADVERTISING IMPORTANT? • Perception that ads should only be donated • Donated ads are often run at undesirable times • Donated ads are often poorly produced www.kmkmedia.com | Facebook.com/kmkmedia | twitter.com/kmkmedia
    24. 24. WHY IS ADVERTISING IMPORTANT? • Perception that ads should only be donated • Donated ads are often run at undesirable times • Donated ads are often poorly produced • “People have a natural desire to be altruistic. When that desire is stimulated, we will give more money to urgent causes — possibly much more.” - Dan Pallotta, Harvard Business Review www.kmkmedia.com | Facebook.com/kmkmedia | twitter.com/kmkmedia
    25. 25. BUDGET www.kmkmedia.com | Facebook.com/kmkmedia | twitter.com/kmkmedia
    26. 26. BUDGET • How much of the budget do I spend on advertising? www.kmkmedia.com | Facebook.com/kmkmedia | twitter.com/kmkmedia
    27. 27. BUDGET • How much of the budget do I spend on advertising? • Depends on certain factors... www.kmkmedia.com | Facebook.com/kmkmedia | twitter.com/kmkmedia
    28. 28. BUDGET • How much of the budget do I spend on advertising? • Depends on certain factors... • Industry www.kmkmedia.com | Facebook.com/kmkmedia | twitter.com/kmkmedia
    29. 29. BUDGET • How much of the budget do I spend on advertising? • Depends on certain factors... • Industry • Goals www.kmkmedia.com | Facebook.com/kmkmedia | twitter.com/kmkmedia
    30. 30. BUDGET • How much of the budget do I spend on advertising? • Depends on certain factors... • Industry • Goals • Size & Age of Organization www.kmkmedia.com | Facebook.com/kmkmedia | twitter.com/kmkmedia
    31. 31. DETAILED PLANNING www.kmkmedia.com | Facebook.com/kmkmedia | twitter.com/kmkmedia
    32. 32. DETAILED PLANNING • Marketing plan www.kmkmedia.com | Facebook.com/kmkmedia | twitter.com/kmkmedia
    33. 33. DETAILED PLANNING • Marketing plan • Track your efforts www.kmkmedia.com | Facebook.com/kmkmedia | twitter.com/kmkmedia
    34. 34. DETAILED PLANNING • Marketing plan • Track your efforts • Measure their effectiveness www.kmkmedia.com | Facebook.com/kmkmedia | twitter.com/kmkmedia
    35. 35. GETTING THE MOST BANG FOR YOUR BUCK www.kmkmedia.com | Facebook.com/kmkmedia | twitter.com/kmkmedia
    36. 36. GETTING THE MOST BANG FOR YOUR BUCK • Always ask for the non-profit rate www.kmkmedia.com | Facebook.com/kmkmedia | twitter.com/kmkmedia
    37. 37. GETTING THE MOST BANG FOR YOUR BUCK • Always ask for the non-profit rate • Google Grants www.kmkmedia.com | Facebook.com/kmkmedia | twitter.com/kmkmedia
    38. 38. GETTING THE MOST BANG FOR YOUR BUCK • Always ask for the non-profit rate • Google Grants • Special rates/bonus www.kmkmedia.com | Facebook.com/kmkmedia | twitter.com/kmkmedia
    39. 39. GETTING THE MOST BANG FOR YOUR BUCK • Always ask for the non-profit rate • Google Grants • Special rates/bonus • Tactics www.kmkmedia.com | Facebook.com/kmkmedia | twitter.com/kmkmedia
    40. 40. GETTING THE MOST BANG FOR YOUR BUCK • Always ask for the non-profit rate • Google Grants • Special rates/bonus • Tactics • Public Relations www.kmkmedia.com | Facebook.com/kmkmedia | twitter.com/kmkmedia
    41. 41. GETTING THE MOST BANG FOR YOUR BUCK • Always ask for the non-profit rate • Google Grants • Special rates/bonus • Tactics • Public Relations • Social Media www.kmkmedia.com | Facebook.com/kmkmedia | twitter.com/kmkmedia
    42. 42. GETTING THE MOST BANG FOR YOUR BUCK • Always ask for the non-profit rate • Google Grants • Special rates/bonus • Tactics • Public Relations • Social Media • Traditional Advertising www.kmkmedia.com | Facebook.com/kmkmedia | twitter.com/kmkmedia
    43. 43. GETTING THE MOST BANG FOR YOUR BUCK • Always ask for the non-profit rate • Google Grants • Special rates/bonus • Tactics • Public Relations • Social Media • Traditional Advertising • Special events/fundraisers www.kmkmedia.com | Facebook.com/kmkmedia | twitter.com/kmkmedia
    44. 44. GETTING THE MOST BANG FOR YOUR BUCK • Always ask for the non-profit rate • Google Grants • Special rates/bonus • Tactics • Public Relations • Social Media • Traditional Advertising • Special events/fundraisers • Website www.kmkmedia.com | Facebook.com/kmkmedia | twitter.com/kmkmedia
    45. 45. PUBLIC RELATIONS www.kmkmedia.com | Facebook.com/kmkmedia | twitter.com/kmkmedia
    46. 46. PUBLIC RELATIONS • What is news? www.kmkmedia.com | Facebook.com/kmkmedia | twitter.com/kmkmedia
    47. 47. PUBLIC RELATIONS • What is news? • How is it covered? www.kmkmedia.com | Facebook.com/kmkmedia | twitter.com/kmkmedia
    48. 48. PUBLIC RELATIONS • What is news? • How is it covered? • Newspapers www.kmkmedia.com | Facebook.com/kmkmedia | twitter.com/kmkmedia
    49. 49. PUBLIC RELATIONS • What is news? • How is it covered? • Newspapers • TV www.kmkmedia.com | Facebook.com/kmkmedia | twitter.com/kmkmedia
    50. 50. PUBLIC RELATIONS • What is news? • How is it covered? • Newspapers • TV • Radio www.kmkmedia.com | Facebook.com/kmkmedia | twitter.com/kmkmedia
    51. 51. NEW MEDIA www.kmkmedia.com | Facebook.com/kmkmedia | twitter.com/kmkmedia
    52. 52. NEW MEDIA • Text campaigns - mGive.com/TextDonations www.kmkmedia.com | Facebook.com/kmkmedia | twitter.com/kmkmedia
    53. 53. NEW MEDIA • Textcampaigns - mGive.com/TextDonations • E-mail newsletters www.kmkmedia.com | Facebook.com/kmkmedia | twitter.com/kmkmedia
    54. 54. NEW MEDIA • Textcampaigns - mGive.com/TextDonations • E-mail newsletters • Facebook, Twitter, MySpace www.kmkmedia.com | Facebook.com/kmkmedia | twitter.com/kmkmedia
    55. 55. NEW MEDIA • Textcampaigns - mGive.com/TextDonations • E-mail newsletters • Facebook, Twitter, MySpace • Facebook Causes www.kmkmedia.com | Facebook.com/kmkmedia | twitter.com/kmkmedia
    56. 56. WHY USE FACEBOOK? www.kmkmedia.com | Facebook.com/kmkmedia | twitter.com/kmkmedia
    57. 57. WHY USE FACEBOOK? • Usefulfor a deeper experience than with Twitter or LinkedIn www.kmkmedia.com | Facebook.com/kmkmedia | twitter.com/kmkmedia
    58. 58. WHY USE FACEBOOK? • Usefulfor a deeper experience than with Twitter or LinkedIn • Fastest growing social media site, particularly among users 35+ www.kmkmedia.com | Facebook.com/kmkmedia | twitter.com/kmkmedia
    59. 59. WHY USE FACEBOOK? • Usefulfor a deeper experience than with Twitter or LinkedIn • Fastest growing social media site, particularly among users 35+ • You’re missing opportunities if you’re not on it. www.kmkmedia.com | Facebook.com/kmkmedia | twitter.com/kmkmedia
    60. 60. WHY USE FACEBOOK? • Usefulfor a deeper experience than with Twitter or LinkedIn • Fastest growing social media site, particularly among users 35+ • You’re missing opportunities if you’re not on it. • Facebook Causes - specifically for non-profits (fund- and friend-raising) www.kmkmedia.com | Facebook.com/kmkmedia | twitter.com/kmkmedia
    61. 61. TO TWEET OR NOT TO TWEET? www.kmkmedia.com | Facebook.com/kmkmedia | twitter.com/kmkmedia
    62. 62. WHY USE TWITTER www.kmkmedia.com | Facebook.com/kmkmedia | twitter.com/kmkmedia
    63. 63. WHY USE TWITTER • Stay connected www.kmkmedia.com | Facebook.com/kmkmedia | twitter.com/kmkmedia
    64. 64. WHY USE TWITTER • Stay connected • Get real-time feedback www.kmkmedia.com | Facebook.com/kmkmedia | twitter.com/kmkmedia
    65. 65. WHY USE TWITTER • Stay connected • Get real-time feedback • Keep up with industry news www.kmkmedia.com | Facebook.com/kmkmedia | twitter.com/kmkmedia
    66. 66. WHY USE TWITTER • Stay connected • Get real-time feedback • Keep up with industry news • Disseminate information www.kmkmedia.com | Facebook.com/kmkmedia | twitter.com/kmkmedia
    67. 67. WHY USE TWITTER • Stay connected • Get real-time feedback • Keep up with industry news • Disseminate information • Learn from industry leaders www.kmkmedia.com | Facebook.com/kmkmedia | twitter.com/kmkmedia
    68. 68. WHY USE TWITTER • Stay connected • Get real-time feedback • Keep up with industry news • Disseminate information • Learn from industry leaders • Crisis Communications www.kmkmedia.com | Facebook.com/kmkmedia | twitter.com/kmkmedia
    69. 69. SPECIAL EVENTS/FUNDRAISERS www.kmkmedia.com | Facebook.com/kmkmedia | twitter.com/kmkmedia
    70. 70. SPECIAL EVENTS/FUNDRAISERS • Local Emcees www.kmkmedia.com | Facebook.com/kmkmedia | twitter.com/kmkmedia
    71. 71. SPECIAL EVENTS/FUNDRAISERS • Local Emcees • Media Sponsorships www.kmkmedia.com | Facebook.com/kmkmedia | twitter.com/kmkmedia
    72. 72. SPECIAL EVENTS/FUNDRAISERS • Local Emcees • Media Sponsorships • Pros/cons www.kmkmedia.com | Facebook.com/kmkmedia | twitter.com/kmkmedia
    73. 73. SPECIAL EVENTS/FUNDRAISERS • Local Emcees • Media Sponsorships • Pros/cons • Ask for details/contracts www.kmkmedia.com | Facebook.com/kmkmedia | twitter.com/kmkmedia
    74. 74. WEBSITES www.kmkmedia.com | Facebook.com/kmkmedia | twitter.com/kmkmedia
    75. 75. WEBSITES • Why is your website important? www.kmkmedia.com | Facebook.com/kmkmedia | twitter.com/kmkmedia
    76. 76. WEBSITES • Why is your website important? • Information www.kmkmedia.com | Facebook.com/kmkmedia | twitter.com/kmkmedia
    77. 77. WEBSITES • Why is your website important? • Information • Donations www.kmkmedia.com | Facebook.com/kmkmedia | twitter.com/kmkmedia
    78. 78. WEBSITES • Why is your website important? • Information • Donations • Tracking & Measurement www.kmkmedia.com | Facebook.com/kmkmedia | twitter.com/kmkmedia
    79. 79. WEBSITES • Why is your website important? • Information • Donations • Tracking & Measurement • Online newsroom www.kmkmedia.com | Facebook.com/kmkmedia | twitter.com/kmkmedia
    80. 80. EXAMPLES
    81. 81. EXAMPLES
    82. 82. EXAMPLES
    83. 83. EXAMPLES
    84. 84. EXAMPLES
    85. 85. EXAMPLES
    86. 86. EXAMPLES
    87. 87. EXAMPLES
    88. 88. EXAMPLES
    89. 89. EXAMPLES
    90. 90. EXAMPLES
    91. 91. EXAMPLES
    92. 92. STRATEGY www.kmkmedia.com | Facebook.com/kmkmedia | twitter.com/kmkmedia
    93. 93. STRATEGY • Allocate budget effectively www.kmkmedia.com | Facebook.com/kmkmedia | twitter.com/kmkmedia
    94. 94. STRATEGY • Allocatebudget effectively • Save time and money www.kmkmedia.com | Facebook.com/kmkmedia | twitter.com/kmkmedia
    95. 95. STRATEGY • Allocatebudget effectively • Save time and money • Track and measure www.kmkmedia.com | Facebook.com/kmkmedia | twitter.com/kmkmedia
    96. 96. Q&A •Email: pam@kmkmedia.com •Call: KMK Media Group at 815-399-2805 •View this presentation: www.kmkmedia.com/ADV2010 www.kmkmedia.com | Facebook.com/kmkmedia | twitter.com/kmkmedia

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