©2012 Cengage Learning.
All Rights Reserved.
Chapter 13
Arranging the Learning Environment
©2012 Cengage Learning.
All Rights Reserved.
The Inclusive Environment
• Arrange environments so that all children
can be ...
©2012 Cengage Learning.
All Rights Reserved.
Preventive Discipline
• Communicate to children your
expectations.
• Make it ...
©2012 Cengage Learning.
All Rights Reserved.
Arrangements for Learning
• Set up the environment for learning to take
place...
©2012 Cengage Learning.
All Rights Reserved.
Arrangements for Learning (continued)
• Types of learning
– Self-help or inde...
©2012 Cengage Learning.
All Rights Reserved.
Arrangements for Learning (continued)
– Toilet facilities
• Allowing space to...
©2012 Cengage Learning.
All Rights Reserved.
Arrangements for Learning (continued)
– Cubby areas
• A place for each child ...
©2012 Cengage Learning.
All Rights Reserved.
Arrangements for Learning (continued)
– Sleeping areas
• Put in a quiet area ...
©2012 Cengage Learning.
All Rights Reserved.
Arrangements for Learning (continued)
– Teacher-structured activities
• Have ...
©2012 Cengage Learning.
All Rights Reserved.
Arrangements for Learning (continued)
– Discovery learning—free play, center ...
©2012 Cengage Learning.
All Rights Reserved.
Planning Early Learning Environments
• Safety
– Order and organization
• Arra...
©2012 Cengage Learning.
All Rights Reserved.
Planning Early Learning Environments
(continued)
– Safe outdoor environments
...
©2012 Cengage Learning.
All Rights Reserved.
Planning Early Learning Environments
(continued)
• Visibility
– Children will...
©2012 Cengage Learning.
All Rights Reserved.
Planning Early Learning Environments
(continued)
• Matching children and equi...
©2012 Cengage Learning.
All Rights Reserved.
Planning Early Learning Environments
(continued)
• Ease of movement
– The cla...
©2012 Cengage Learning.
All Rights Reserved.
Planning Early Learning Environments
(continued)
• Promoting independence
– I...
©2012 Cengage Learning.
All Rights Reserved.
Planning Early Learning Environments
(continued)
• Teachers’ availability
– I...
©2012 Cengage Learning.
All Rights Reserved.
Planning Early Learning Environments
(continued)
• Offering choice
– Giving c...
©2012 Cengage Learning.
All Rights Reserved.
Planning Early Learning Environments
(continued)
• Novelty versus familiarity...
©2012 Cengage Learning.
All Rights Reserved.
Planning Early Learning Environments
(continued)
• Structured flexibility
– W...
©2012 Cengage Learning.
All Rights Reserved.
Scheduling
• Principles related to scheduling
– Accommodating individual diff...
©2012 Cengage Learning.
All Rights Reserved.
Scheduling (continued)
– Giving advance notice—let children know that
one act...
©2012 Cengage Learning.
All Rights Reserved.
Application of Scheduling Principles
• Every center needs to do what works fo...
©2012 Cengage Learning.
All Rights Reserved.
Application of Scheduling Principles
(continued)
• Learning goals schedule an...
©2012 Cengage Learning.
All Rights Reserved.
Application of Scheduling Principles
(continued)
• Teacher schedules
– This d...
©2012 Cengage Learning.
All Rights Reserved.
Application of Scheduling Principles
(continued)
• Transitions
– Planning for...
©2012 Cengage Learning.
All Rights Reserved.
Application of Scheduling Principles
(continued)
• Procedures
– Establishing ...
©2012 Cengage Learning.
All Rights Reserved.
Application of Scheduling Principles
(continued)
• Considerations for infants...
©2012 Cengage Learning.
All Rights Reserved.
Application of Scheduling Principles
(continued)
• Consideration for early el...
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Chapter13 allen7e

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EDU 221 Children With Exceptionalities

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Chapter13 allen7e

  1. 1. ©2012 Cengage Learning. All Rights Reserved. Chapter 13 Arranging the Learning Environment
  2. 2. ©2012 Cengage Learning. All Rights Reserved. The Inclusive Environment • Arrange environments so that all children can be successful. – Avoid loud centers that could be distracting for hearing-impaired children. – Avoid clutter on floor that would be a hazard for children with mobility issues.
  3. 3. ©2012 Cengage Learning. All Rights Reserved. Preventive Discipline • Communicate to children your expectations. • Make it easy for children to learn. • Avoid unnecessary errors. • Ensure a positive climate.
  4. 4. ©2012 Cengage Learning. All Rights Reserved. Arrangements for Learning • Set up the environment for learning to take place. • Materials should be at eye level and easily organized. • Have enough room to move, discover, and play. • Observe to find problem areas and rearrange centers to stop them.
  5. 5. ©2012 Cengage Learning. All Rights Reserved. Arrangements for Learning (continued) • Types of learning – Self-help or independence skills • Emphasize activities that promote independence and self-help skills. • Child learns to dress, eat, and ask for help.
  6. 6. ©2012 Cengage Learning. All Rights Reserved. Arrangements for Learning (continued) – Toilet facilities • Allowing space to maneuver • A handrail to allow independence in sitting and standing • A footstool for feet to resist fear of falling in
  7. 7. ©2012 Cengage Learning. All Rights Reserved. Arrangements for Learning (continued) – Cubby areas • A place for each child to place personal belongings • Kept close to the exit and toilet areas • Allow for independence of saving materials or getting items for nap time
  8. 8. ©2012 Cengage Learning. All Rights Reserved. Arrangements for Learning (continued) – Sleeping areas • Put in a quiet area away from distractions • Close blinds, play soft music • Cots should be stored where children can help with setup and cleanup
  9. 9. ©2012 Cengage Learning. All Rights Reserved. Arrangements for Learning (continued) – Teacher-structured activities • Have a space where a teacher can work with a small group, large group, or one-on-one. • Lessons are taught related to skills the children need to work on. • After the lesson, the goal is for the children to continue practice on their own.
  10. 10. ©2012 Cengage Learning. All Rights Reserved. Arrangements for Learning (continued) – Discovery learning—free play, center time • Children discover while engaging with materials • Play is a form of learning through a child-directed activity
  11. 11. ©2012 Cengage Learning. All Rights Reserved. Planning Early Learning Environments • Safety – Order and organization • Arrange equipment so that everything has its place. • Order the environment and reset it so that each child has the opportunity to play with it new.
  12. 12. ©2012 Cengage Learning. All Rights Reserved. Planning Early Learning Environments (continued) – Safe outdoor environments • Supervision • Age appropriate • Safe fall zones • Equipment and surface maintenance
  13. 13. ©2012 Cengage Learning. All Rights Reserved. Planning Early Learning Environments (continued) • Visibility – Children will hide to try new things and for the pleasure of it. – Teachers need to see all areas of the room and outdoors at all times. – Find a place to stand to allow 100 percent visibility.
  14. 14. ©2012 Cengage Learning. All Rights Reserved. Planning Early Learning Environments (continued) • Matching children and equipment – Check toys for safety. – Include all parts of the toy. – Check for choking hazards. – Toys need to be appropriate for the youngest learner and yet not bore the more advanced.
  15. 15. ©2012 Cengage Learning. All Rights Reserved. Planning Early Learning Environments (continued) • Ease of movement – The class needs to be set up so that the children can move freely through the room. – The children should not have so much freedom that they begin to run and cause safety issues.
  16. 16. ©2012 Cengage Learning. All Rights Reserved. Planning Early Learning Environments (continued) • Promoting independence – In arranging the environment, all materials that children are allowed to have should be where the children can reach them. – Children should know how to put the toys back. – Shelves should be labeled for ease. – Simple directions should be used for transitions.
  17. 17. ©2012 Cengage Learning. All Rights Reserved. Planning Early Learning Environments (continued) • Teachers’ availability – If the classroom is organized effectively, teachers can teach. – Zone teaching is one way. – Teachers work in a zone or area and enhance learning while the children are in that play area.
  18. 18. ©2012 Cengage Learning. All Rights Reserved. Planning Early Learning Environments (continued) • Offering choice – Giving children options for play or snack – Allowing children to assert their independence – More options to learn the same material
  19. 19. ©2012 Cengage Learning. All Rights Reserved. Planning Early Learning Environments (continued) • Novelty versus familiarity – Children like the familiarity of their class. – It provides comfort. – Novelty, though, keeps the excitement going.
  20. 20. ©2012 Cengage Learning. All Rights Reserved. Planning Early Learning Environments (continued) • Structured flexibility – Well-structured environments allow flexibility in use and design. – The rules are consistent, but the discovery with the materials is flexible and adaptable to meet each child’s needs.
  21. 21. ©2012 Cengage Learning. All Rights Reserved. Scheduling • Principles related to scheduling – Accommodating individual differences, lessons relate to each individual’s needs. – Varying activity levels—vary high-movement activities with quiet activities to allow children to regain their energy. – Ensuring orderly sequences—the schedule should flow, not be choppy without connections. Build in transitions.
  22. 22. ©2012 Cengage Learning. All Rights Reserved. Scheduling (continued) – Giving advance notice—let children know that one activity is ending and a new one is about to begin.
  23. 23. ©2012 Cengage Learning. All Rights Reserved. Application of Scheduling Principles • Every center needs to do what works for them. • Staff numbers and children’s ages and ability levels need to be considered. • Refer to the text for a sample schedule.
  24. 24. ©2012 Cengage Learning. All Rights Reserved. Application of Scheduling Principles (continued) • Learning goals schedule and embedded learning opportunities – Goals are what is taught. – They come from the IEP or the curriculum for that age group. – They are taught throughout the day in a variety of settings using a variety of materials.
  25. 25. ©2012 Cengage Learning. All Rights Reserved. Application of Scheduling Principles (continued) • Teacher schedules – This documents what a teacher will be teaching where in the classroom. – It is done both individually and in a large group. – It is usually done one week at a time.
  26. 26. ©2012 Cengage Learning. All Rights Reserved. Application of Scheduling Principles (continued) • Transitions – Planning for transitions will ease the pressure of one activity ending and another starting. – Transitions should be planned. – It is a great time to do one-on-one activities or reinforce a new skill.
  27. 27. ©2012 Cengage Learning. All Rights Reserved. Application of Scheduling Principles (continued) • Procedures – Establishing a routine for all procedures will enable children to be independent. – A piece of music can be used as a cue. – Determine procedures to be taught. – How to teach them. – Practice them. – Reinforce them and review.
  28. 28. ©2012 Cengage Learning. All Rights Reserved. Application of Scheduling Principles (continued) • Considerations for infants and toddlers – Use the environment to teach, everything from the flooring to the lighting. – Set up the environment so that the teacher can enjoy the children exploring without constant worry about safety. – Aim for continuity of care, where a caregiver stays with a child for years instead of months.
  29. 29. ©2012 Cengage Learning. All Rights Reserved. Application of Scheduling Principles (continued) • Consideration for early elementary years – Children should be encouraged to be independent. – Children are expected to improve their literacy skills. – A balance of high physical activity with quiet activity is necessary. – Outdoor recess should be a consideration.
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