Your SlideShare is downloading. ×

Chapter04 allen7e

80

Published on

EDU 221 Children With Exceptionalities

EDU 221 Children With Exceptionalities

Published in: Education, Health & Medicine
0 Comments
0 Likes
Statistics
Notes
  • Be the first to comment

  • Be the first to like this

No Downloads
Views
Total Views
80
On Slideshare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
0
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
2
Comments
0
Likes
0
Embeds 0
No embeds

Report content
Flagged as inappropriate Flag as inappropriate
Flag as inappropriate

Select your reason for flagging this presentation as inappropriate.

Cancel
No notes for slide

Transcript

  • 1. ©2012 Cengage Learning. All Rights Reserved. Chapter 4 Normal and Exceptional Development
  • 2. ©2012 Cengage Learning. All Rights Reserved. What Is Normal or Typical Development? • This implies an ongoing process of growing, changing, and acquiring a range of complex skills. • Beginning in earliest infancy, the process moves along a developmental continuum according to a predictable pattern common to most children of the same age.
  • 3. ©2012 Cengage Learning. All Rights Reserved. What Is Normal or Typical Development? (continued) • Developmental sequences – Children learn skills in a sequence. – Based on their age, we know what skills the child should learn next. • Developmental milestones – This is the order in which the child will learn the skills from the developmental sequence.
  • 4. ©2012 Cengage Learning. All Rights Reserved. What Is Normal or Typical Development? (continued) • Infancy – Brain research has greatly improved. – Many studies have been done on early brain stimulation and the lasting effects. – Infants need caregivers and parents to offer activities, materials, and communication to enhance brain development.
  • 5. ©2012 Cengage Learning. All Rights Reserved. What Is Normal or Typical Development? (continued) • Infancy (continued) – Attachment has begun through the give and take between the caregiver and the child. – The infant is Piaget’s sensorimotor stage of development. • Learning through movement and their senses
  • 6. ©2012 Cengage Learning. All Rights Reserved. What Is Normal or Typical Development? (continued) • Toddlerhood – This lasts from 18 to 36 months of age. – Toilet training may begin. – Independence is sought. – The word “mine” enters the vocabulary.
  • 7. ©2012 Cengage Learning. All Rights Reserved. What Is Normal or Typical Development? (continued) • Preschool years—ages three to five – Children are developing creativity. – Language is used correctly and understood by most older people. – Physical skills are greatly improved. – Empathy toward others and sharing are apparent.
  • 8. ©2012 Cengage Learning. All Rights Reserved. What Is Normal or Typical Development? (continued) • Primary years – Learning to read is a major milestone for this group. – Best friends and friendships are important. – Self-care skills are done independently. – Growth is slowed but still continues.
  • 9. ©2012 Cengage Learning. All Rights Reserved. What Is Atypical or Exceptional Development? • Developmental disabilities – A child is unable to perform like typically developing peers, but the potential for growth is still present. • Developmental delay – This exists when a child is performing like a child who is typically developing of a much younger age.
  • 10. ©2012 Cengage Learning. All Rights Reserved. Children and Developmental Risk • Biological risks – Birth defects – Chromosomal abnormalities – Heart defects • Environmental risks – Poverty – Child abuse and neglect
  • 11. ©2012 Cengage Learning. All Rights Reserved. Children and Developmental Risk (continued) • Resilience and vulnerability – Resilient children take the worst and make the best out of it. – Vulnerable children do not recover from the worst and continue in a downward spiral.
  • 12. ©2012 Cengage Learning. All Rights Reserved. Children and Developmental Risk (continued) • Children with special gifts and talents – Theory of multiple intelligences • Gardner says there are eight. Everyone has one intelligence that is stronger than the others. – Gifted and talented children • They may be at risk, due to the lack of funding provided for these children.
  • 13. ©2012 Cengage Learning. All Rights Reserved. Children and Developmental Risk (continued) • Characteristics of young gifted and children – Have advanced vocabulary – Learn quickly – Are curious – Find and solve difficult and unusual problems
  • 14. ©2012 Cengage Learning. All Rights Reserved. Children and Developmental Risk (continued) • Gifted minority children – Gifted programs were originally developed for white middle-class students. – Assessments tend to be biased. – Economically disadvantaged children tend to be overlooked. – English as a second language learners are also not readily identified.
  • 15. ©2012 Cengage Learning. All Rights Reserved. Children and Developmental Risk (continued) • Children with developmental disabilities who are gifted – Yes, you can have a disability and be gifted at the same time—sometimes even in the same developmental domain. – Children with disabilities still need to be considered for gifted programs. – Identification needs to come from classroom observations, not purely test scores.

×