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Chapter01 allen7e
Chapter01 allen7e
Chapter01 allen7e
Chapter01 allen7e
Chapter01 allen7e
Chapter01 allen7e
Chapter01 allen7e
Chapter01 allen7e
Chapter01 allen7e
Chapter01 allen7e
Chapter01 allen7e
Chapter01 allen7e
Chapter01 allen7e
Chapter01 allen7e
Chapter01 allen7e
Chapter01 allen7e
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Chapter01 allen7e
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Chapter01 allen7e

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EDU 221 Children With Exceptionalities

EDU 221 Children With Exceptionalities

Published in: Education, Self Improvement
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  • 1. Chapter 1 An Inclusive Approach to Early Education ©2012 Cengage Learning. All Rights Reserved.
  • 2. Inclusion Defined • Inclusion means that children with special needs attend school with normally developing peers. • Inclusion is belonging, being valued, and having choices. • Inclusion is accepting children and families and encouraging their participation. ©2012 Cengage Learning. All Rights Reserved.
  • 3. Inclusion in Perspective • Forget and hide—children with disabilities were placed in institutions, and families were told to forget about them. • Screen and segregate—people with disabilities now had civil rights. ©2012 Cengage Learning. All Rights Reserved.
  • 4. Inclusion in Perspective (continued) • Identify and help—children were now identified earlier, so treatment could begin earlier. • Include and support—Americans with Disabilities Act is passed and inclusion begins. ©2012 Cengage Learning. All Rights Reserved.
  • 5. Rationale for Inclusive Early Education • Ethical issue—segregated classes for children with disabilities often do not have the materials, funding, and support of regular classrooms, making their education inadequate. ©2012 Cengage Learning. All Rights Reserved.
  • 6. Rationale for Inclusive Early Education (continued) • Socialization issue—through inclusion equal social status is implied: – Children of varying abilities grow up together, and acceptance is mainstream. – Re-entry into the social norms is not necessary, because they are already a part of the norm. ©2012 Cengage Learning. All Rights Reserved.
  • 7. Rationale for Inclusive Early Education (continued) • Developmental issues – Children with and without disabilities are provided lessons that enhance their level of development. – Children learn from each other. – Children model appropriate interactions with others. ©2012 Cengage Learning. All Rights Reserved.
  • 8. Rationale for Inclusive Early Education (continued) • Cost issue—cost is actually reduced, because existing program structures are already in place. – Segregating typical and atypical children actually costs more and is a duplication of services. ©2012 Cengage Learning. All Rights Reserved.
  • 9. Supporting Inclusion: Implications for Teachers • Structuring child-child interactions – The teacher needs to focus her activities on encouraging play between children with and without activities. – After a period of imitating each other’s behaviors, children will begin to play together on their own. ©2012 Cengage Learning. All Rights Reserved.
  • 10. Supporting Inclusion: Implications for Teachers (continued) • Planning classroom activities – Activity-based approach has the teacher develop lessons based on typical preschool activities and incorporate IFSP and IEP goals at the same time. ©2012 Cengage Learning. All Rights Reserved.
  • 11. Supporting Inclusion: Implications for Teachers (continued) • Professional collaboration – Interdisciplinary teams are developed and must work together to meet the needs of the individual child. – Professionals share their strengths to improve the child’s educational outcomes. ©2012 Cengage Learning. All Rights Reserved.
  • 12. Benefits of Inclusion • Benefits for children with disabilities – Gains are made in • social competence • social play • developmental domains • higher levels of play ©2012 Cengage Learning. All Rights Reserved.
  • 13. Benefits of Inclusion (continued) • Benefits for typically developing children – Developmental outcomes • These do not suffer; in fact, typically developing children continue to grow in skill development and benefit from the lower staff/child ratio. ©2012 Cengage Learning. All Rights Reserved.
  • 14. Benefits of Inclusion (continued) • Peer tutoring – Children benefit from explaining what they know to someone else. – Explaining their knowledge to a peer makes it more special because they are helping a friend. ©2012 Cengage Learning. All Rights Reserved.
  • 15. Benefits of Inclusion (continued) • Developing sensitivity – Understanding differences – Becoming aware of our strengths and weaknesses – Not being afraid to ask for help ©2012 Cengage Learning. All Rights Reserved.
  • 16. Benefits of Inclusion (continued) • Benefits for families – Parents’ attitudes become more positive over time as they see • their children become more accepting of differences • their children become more comfortable around all people ©2012 Cengage Learning. All Rights Reserved.
  • 17. Benefits of Inclusion (continued) • Benefits for society – As the children grow into adults, they are • more accepting of individual differences • more mature in their responses around others • able to respect others for what they can do ©2012 Cengage Learning. All Rights Reserved.
  • 18. Concerns and Challenges of Inclusion • Will special needs be served? – Parents and professionals often feel that they cannot meet the needs of the child. – Are specialized services going to be available? – If so much time is spent on children with disabilities, will the typical children feel shortchanged? ©2012 Cengage Learning. All Rights Reserved.
  • 19. Concerns and Challenges of Inclusion (continued) • Concerns about inappropriate behaviors – Normally developing children will begin to imitate inappropriate behaviors of children with disabilities. • This is unfounded and false. • Children will not imitate unusual or stereotypical behaviors. ©2012 Cengage Learning. All Rights Reserved.
  • 20. Concerns and Challenges of Inclusion (continued) • Will special needs children be teased? – Not if given good role models who answer questions honestly and support friendships ©2012 Cengage Learning. All Rights Reserved.
  • 21. Final Thoughts • Inclusion is the law. • There are more benefits than downfalls. • Society will be more accepting of all individuals. • Cost should not be a deterring factor. • Try it; you might like it. ©2012 Cengage Learning. All Rights Reserved.

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