OSHA PROPOSED SUBPART D & I:   WALKING-WORKING SURFACES AND PPE
THANK YOU FOR JOINING US <ul><li>To learn more about fall protection from LJB Inc. </li></ul><ul><li>Blog </li></ul><ul><u...
INTRODUCTION <ul><li>LJB Inc. </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Three divisions </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Safety division focused on ...
INTRODUCTION <ul><li>Thom Kramer, P.E., C.S.P. </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Principal in LJB Safety division </li></ul></ul><ul><...
LEARNING OBJECTIVES <ul><li>Summarize the content of the proposed regulation. </li></ul><ul><li>Identify key issues with p...
CALL TO ACTION <ul><li>Read Proposed Regulatory Text (pages 29131 to 29153) </li></ul><ul><li>Submit comments that either ...
AGENDA <ul><li>Background on regulation </li></ul><ul><li>OSHA’s reasons for changes and claims </li></ul><ul><li>Organiza...
BACKGROUND <ul><li>1971 – 29CFR 1910 Subpart D was adopted </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Originally based on pre-1971 ANSI standar...
BACKGROUND-cont. <ul><li>1984 – OSHA issues Std 1-1.13  </li></ul><ul><li>1990 – OSHA proposed another revision </li></ul>...
AGENDA <ul><li>Background on regulation </li></ul><ul><li>OSHA’s reasons for changes and claims </li></ul><ul><li>Organiza...
OSHA’S GOALS <ul><li>OSHA proposes subpart D to accomplish </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Reflect current industry practices and na...
STATISTICS <ul><li>Slips, Trips and Falls – 15% of all accidental deaths </li></ul><ul><li>2 nd  to motor vehicles in caus...
WHY UPDATE THE REGULATION? <ul><li>Prevent 20 workplace fatalities per year </li></ul><ul><li>Prevent over 3,700 injuries ...
WHY UPDATE THE REGULATION? <ul><li>Prevent 20 workplace fatalities per year </li></ul><ul><li>Prevent over 3,700 injuries ...
WHY UPDATE THE REGULATION? <ul><li>Reduce fall injuries and fatalities by  </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Updating to include new t...
WHY UPDATE THE REGULATION? <ul><li>Reduce fall injuries and fatalities by  </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Updating to include new t...
TOTAL FALL FATALITIES Source:  BLS Census of Fatal Occupational Injuries
TOTAL FALL FATALITIES Source:  BLS Census of Fatal Occupational Injuries +28%
SPECIFIC ISSUES PER OSHA <ul><li>Fall protection on rolling stock and motor vehicles  </li></ul><ul><li>Fall protection fo...
AGENDA <ul><li>Background on regulation </li></ul><ul><li>OSHA’s reasons for changes and claims </li></ul><ul><li>Organiza...
ORGANIZATION OF FR NOTICE <ul><li>I. Background </li></ul><ul><li>II. Analysis of Risk </li></ul><ul><li>III. Issues </li>...
ORGANIZATION OF FR NOTICE-cont. <ul><li>VII. OMB Review Under the Paperwork Reduction Act of 1995 </li></ul><ul><li>VIII. ...
RECOMMENDED READING <ul><li>Proposed Regulatory Text:  pages 29131 to 29153   </li></ul><ul><li>Issues:  pages 28867 to 28...
SUBPART D - CONTENT  <ul><li>29 CFR 1910.XX </li></ul><ul><li>.21 – Scope, application and definitions </li></ul><ul><li>....
SUBPART D – CONTENT- cont.  <ul><li>29 CFR 1910.XX </li></ul><ul><li>.26 – Dockboards </li></ul><ul><li>.27 – Scaffolds </...
SUBPART I - CONTENT <ul><li>29 CFR 1910.XXX </li></ul><ul><li>.132 – General requirements </li></ul><ul><li>.140 – Fall pr...
WHAT IS CONSIDERED A HAZARD? <ul><li>§ 1910.28 Duty to have fall protection </li></ul><ul><li>§ 1910.29 Fall protection sy...
HAZARD LOCATIONS <ul><li>§ 1910.28 Duty to have fall protection </li></ul><ul><ul><li>(b) Protection from fall hazards </l...
HAZARD LOCATIONS <ul><li>§ 1910.28 Duty to have fall protection (cont.) </li></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Wall openings </li></ul>...
HAZARD LOCATIONS <ul><li>§ 1910.29 Fall protection systems criteria and practices </li></ul><ul><ul><li>(b) Guardrail syst...
HAZARD LOCATIONS <ul><li>§ 1910.29 Fall protection systems criteria and practices (cont.) </li></ul><ul><ul><li>(g) Cages,...
AGENDA <ul><li>Background on regulation </li></ul><ul><li>OSHA’s reasons for changes and claims </li></ul><ul><li>Organiza...
ITEMS OF INTEREST – TOP 10 <ul><li>10. ANSI vs. OSHA </li></ul>
ITEMS OF INTEREST – TOP 10 <ul><li>10. ANSI vs. OSHA </li></ul><ul><li>9.  OSHA is making 1910 consistent with 1926 and 19...
ITEMS OF INTEREST – TOP 10 <ul><li>10. ANSI vs. OSHA </li></ul><ul><li>9.  OSHA is making 1910 consistent with 1926 and 19...
ITEMS OF INTEREST – TOP 10 <ul><li>10. ANSI vs. OSHA </li></ul><ul><li>9.  OSHA is making 1910 consistent with 1926 and 19...
WHY UPDATE THE REGULATION? <ul><li>Prevent  20  workplace fatalities per year </li></ul><ul><li>Prevent over 3,700 injurie...
ITEMS OF INTEREST – TOP 10 <ul><li>10. ANSI vs. OSHA </li></ul><ul><li>9.  OSHA is making 1910 consistent with 1926 and 19...
STD 1-1.13 <ul><li>Use fixed platforms when: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Work access is frequent, regular and predictable </li><...
WALKING-WORKING SURFACES AND ROOFS <ul><li>Standard does not specify a distance from a roof edge at which fall protection ...
ITEMS OF INTEREST – TOP 10 <ul><li>5.  Allows use of PFAS in situations where fall hazard is 4 feet </li></ul>
ITEMS OF INTEREST – TOP 10 <ul><li>5.  Allows use of PFAS in situations where fall hazard is 4 feet </li></ul><ul><li>4.  ...
ITEMS OF INTEREST – TOP 10 <ul><li>5.  Allows use of PFAS in situations where fall hazard is 4 feet </li></ul><ul><li>4.  ...
SAFETY NETS V. ANCHORAGES <ul><li>Two types of fall arrest systems: collective v. personal  </li></ul><ul><li>Both support...
SAFETY NETS V. ANCHORS <ul><li>Test weight used: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Nets: 400 pounds of sand </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li...
SAFETY NETS V. ANCHORAGES <ul><li>Safety nets: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>400 pound weight </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Redundanc...
ITEMS OF INTEREST – TOP 10 <ul><li>5.  Allows use of PFAS in situations where fall hazard is 4 feet </li></ul><ul><li>4.  ...
COST CONSIDERATIONS <ul><li>Two factors for compliance </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Cost associated with codifying the fall prote...
COST CONSIDERATIONS <ul><li>Two factors for the cost of compliance </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Cost associated with codifying th...
ITEMS OF INTEREST – TOP 10 <ul><li>5.  Allows use of PFAS in situations where fall hazard is 4 feet </li></ul><ul><li>4.  ...
GRANDFATHER CLAUSE <ul><li>Grandfather clause for the following sections: </li></ul><ul><li>§ 1910.23(d)(2) – Fixed ladder...
GUARDRAIL HEIGHT <ul><li>36-inch grandfather provision is not included in this proposal </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Nor does OSH...
NOTABLE OMISSIONS <ul><li>Reference to STD 1-1.13 </li></ul><ul><li>Competent person authority </li></ul>
COMPETENT PERSON <ul><li>Identifies existing, foreseeable  and predictable hazards </li></ul><ul><li>Has the authority to ...
NOTABLE OMISSIONS <ul><li>Reference to STD 1-1.13 </li></ul><ul><li>Competent person authority </li></ul><ul><li>Hierarchy...
HIERARCHY OF CONTROL <ul><li>Employers can choose from several options </li></ul><ul><li>Can consider exposure time, avail...
HIERARCHY OF CONTROL
FALL PROTECTION SYSTEM REQUIREMENTS <ul><li>“OSHA’s intent is that fall protection systems be installed, permanently where...
NOTABLE OMISSIONS <ul><li>Reference to STD 1-1.13 </li></ul><ul><li>Competent person authority </li></ul><ul><li>Hierarchy...
NOTABLE OMISSIONS <ul><li>Reference to STD 1-1.13 </li></ul><ul><li>Competent person authority </li></ul><ul><li>Hierarchy...
NOTABLE OMISSIONS <ul><li>Snap hook gate strength </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Recent letter of interpretation from October 13, 2...
NOTABLE OMISSIONS <ul><li>Snap hook gate strength </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Recent letter of interpretation from October 13, 2...
NOTABLE OMISSIONS <ul><li>Snap hook gate strength </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Recent letter of interpretation from October 13, 2...
NOTABLE OMISSIONS <ul><li>Snap hook gate strength </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Recent letter of interpretation from October 13, 2...
NOTABLE OMISSIONS <ul><li>Snap hook gate strength </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Recent letter of interpretation from October 13, 2...
EXEMPTIONS <ul><li>Standard stairs </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Does not cover: </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Floating roof tank...
EXEMPTIONS <ul><li>Repair, service, and assembly pits less than 10 feet in depth. </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Access within 6’ o...
AGENDA <ul><li>Background on regulation </li></ul><ul><li>OSHA’s reasons for changes and claims </li></ul><ul><li>Organiza...
INPUT REQUESTS <ul><li>Fall protection on rolling stock and motor vehicles </li></ul><ul><li>Fall protection for standing ...
SUBMITTING COMMENTS <ul><li>Due August 23, 2010 </li></ul><ul><li>Submit electronically online, fax or regular mail </li><...
LEARNING OBJECTIVES <ul><li>Summarize the content of the proposed regulation. </li></ul><ul><li>Identify key issues with p...
CALL TO ACTION <ul><li>Read Proposed Regulatory Text (pages 29131 to 29153) </li></ul><ul><li>Submit comments that either ...
THANK YOU FOR YOUR TIME <ul><li>To learn more about fall protection from LJB Inc. </li></ul><ul><li>Follow-up webinar:  Fa...
OSHA PROPOSED SUBPART D & I:   WALKING-WORKING SURFACES AND PPE
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Overview of Proposed Changes to OSHA 1910 General Industry Regulations

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New OSHA fall protection regulations have been drafted to update walking-working surfaces and personal protective equipment requirements. This webinar provides an overview of the proposed changes to OSHA's 1910 general industry regulations.

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  • LJB provides engineering, architectural and safety consulting services to many public and private clients. The divisions I represent focuses on safety and specifically, fall protection. In some ways, it is easier to explain what LJB does not do versus what we do. We do not sell equipment. Although equipment is a very important manner to protect workers from hazards, there are more important aspects to consider when creating a sustainable program. While we know all of the manufacturers from our work on the ANSI Z359 committee, we do not sell any equipment.
  • LJB provides engineering, architectural and safety consulting services to many public and private clients. The divisions I represent focuses on safety and specifically, fall protection. In some ways, it is easier to explain what LJB does not do versus what we do. We do not sell equipment. Although equipment is a very important manner to protect workers from hazards, there are more important aspects to consider when creating a sustainable program. While we know all of the manufacturers from our work on the ANSI Z359 committee, we do not sell any equipment.
  • Discuss how I love fall protection. While it is something that is just a part of your job, I, as well as many other at LJB, have dedicated our career to this topic. That is the reasons you see that I am registered as a PE and CSP. In fp, you never have a project that is completely safety or completely engineering. No matter what the solution, there are always aspects of both that need to be considered. For example for a personal fall arrest system, there are obvious structural aspects like the design of the rail or horizontal lifeline to which you attach, the connection to thee building structure, the building structure itself. On the other hand, making sure that a fall arrest system should even be used, is a safety related item. Same as specifying the correct equipment, procedures and training.
  • Note that this is the data from the proposed document, I will discuss 2008 data later.
  • This graph provides a lot of insight into the realm of fall protection regulations. 1995 is the year after subpart M was passed into the law. Setup for 28% and 12% graphic.
  • Copy in book Intro other charts
  • Some ask for very specific input, others do not.
  • LJB provides engineering, architectural and safety consulting services to many public and private clients. The divisions I represent focuses on safety and specifically, fall protection. In some ways, it is easier to explain what LJB does not do versus what we do. We do not sell equipment. Although equipment is a very important manner to protect workers from hazards, there are more important aspects to consider when creating a sustainable program. While we know all of the manufacturers from our work on the ANSI Z359 committee, we do not sell any equipment.
  • Overview of Proposed Changes to OSHA 1910 General Industry Regulations

    1. 1. OSHA PROPOSED SUBPART D & I: WALKING-WORKING SURFACES AND PPE
    2. 2. THANK YOU FOR JOINING US <ul><li>To learn more about fall protection from LJB Inc. </li></ul><ul><li>Blog </li></ul><ul><ul><li>http://www.ljbfallprotectionblog.com </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Podcasts – 60 Seconds for Safety </li></ul><ul><ul><li>http:// www.ljbinc.com/safetybydesign </li></ul></ul><ul><li>YouTube video </li></ul><ul><ul><li>http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Dk7F8UJxnLU </li></ul></ul>
    3. 3. INTRODUCTION <ul><li>LJB Inc. </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Three divisions </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Safety division focused on fall protection </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Program management </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Risk assessments </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Abatement design </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Training </li></ul></ul></ul>
    4. 4. INTRODUCTION <ul><li>Thom Kramer, P.E., C.S.P. </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Principal in LJB Safety division </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>15+ years experience in fall protection industry </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>ANSI Z359 Senior Executive Committee </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Chairman of ANSI Z359.6 </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Chairman of ANSI Z359.17 </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>American Society of Safety Engineers </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>2011 PDC Program Subcommittee Chair </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>International Society for Fall Protection, President </li></ul></ul>
    5. 5. LEARNING OBJECTIVES <ul><li>Summarize the content of the proposed regulation. </li></ul><ul><li>Identify key issues with proposed regulation. </li></ul><ul><li>State actions to assist your organization in implementation. </li></ul>
    6. 6. CALL TO ACTION <ul><li>Read Proposed Regulatory Text (pages 29131 to 29153) </li></ul><ul><li>Submit comments that either address the issues that OSHA has identified or affects your industry. </li></ul><ul><li>Implement ANSI Z359.2 </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Fall hazard survey report </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Procedures </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Training requirements </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Work to eliminate all fall hazards </li></ul>
    7. 7. AGENDA <ul><li>Background on regulation </li></ul><ul><li>OSHA’s reasons for changes and claims </li></ul><ul><li>Organization of the proposed rule FR notice </li></ul><ul><li>Summary of key issues </li></ul><ul><li>Next steps: take-aways </li></ul>
    8. 8. BACKGROUND <ul><li>1971 – 29CFR 1910 Subpart D was adopted </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Originally based on pre-1971 ANSI standards </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Little change since adoption </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Not consistent with standards developed for shipyards and construction </li></ul></ul><ul><li>1973 – OSHA proposed revision </li></ul><ul><li>1976 – OSHA withdrew proposed revision </li></ul>
    9. 9. BACKGROUND-cont. <ul><li>1984 – OSHA issues Std 1-1.13 </li></ul><ul><li>1990 – OSHA proposed another revision </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Reorganize, update and clarify the subpart </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Add personal fall protection requirements to subpart I </li></ul></ul><ul><li>2003 – Rulemaking record reopened </li></ul><ul><li>2005 – Decide to redraft entire rule </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Comments that 1990 rule was outdated </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Did not give adequate consideration to newer technology </li></ul></ul><ul><li>May 24, 2010 – OSHA issues proposed subparts D & I </li></ul>
    10. 10. AGENDA <ul><li>Background on regulation </li></ul><ul><li>OSHA’s reasons for changes and claims </li></ul><ul><li>Organization of the proposed rule FR notice </li></ul><ul><li>Summary of key issues </li></ul><ul><li>Next steps: take-aways </li></ul>
    11. 11. OSHA’S GOALS <ul><li>OSHA proposes subpart D to accomplish </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Reflect current industry practices and national consensus standards </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Harmonize provisions, when possible, with other OSHA provisions (e.g., 1926 and 1915) </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Use performance-oriented language when possible </li></ul></ul>
    12. 12. STATISTICS <ul><li>Slips, Trips and Falls – 15% of all accidental deaths </li></ul><ul><li>2 nd to motor vehicles in causing accidental deaths </li></ul><ul><li>BLS Data for 1992 to 2004 for General Industry </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Average 300 fatal falls annually </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>213 from higher level </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>299,404 lost work day injuries </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>26% from a higher level </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><li>2007 data – 357 fall fatalities with 267 from height </li></ul>
    13. 13. WHY UPDATE THE REGULATION? <ul><li>Prevent 20 workplace fatalities per year </li></ul><ul><li>Prevent over 3,700 injuries per year </li></ul>
    14. 14. WHY UPDATE THE REGULATION? <ul><li>Prevent 20 workplace fatalities per year </li></ul><ul><li>Prevent over 3,700 injuries per year </li></ul><ul><li>From Fatal Falls summary: total (from height) – page 28866 </li></ul><ul><ul><li>1992-2004 (avg per year): 300 (213) </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>2005: 320 (257) </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>2006: 343 (285) </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>2007: 357 (267) </li></ul></ul>
    15. 15. WHY UPDATE THE REGULATION? <ul><li>Reduce fall injuries and fatalities by </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Updating to include new technology (PFAS) </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Updating to include new industry standards </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Reorganizes rule in clearer manner </li></ul><ul><li>Provides greater compliance flexibility </li></ul><ul><li>Written in plain language </li></ul><ul><li>Increases consistency with construction and maritime regulations </li></ul>
    16. 16. WHY UPDATE THE REGULATION? <ul><li>Reduce fall injuries and fatalities by </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Updating to include new technology (PFAS) </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Updating to include new industry standards </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Reorganizes rule in clearer manner </li></ul><ul><li>Provides greater compliance flexibility </li></ul><ul><li>Written in plain language </li></ul><ul><li>Increases consistency with construction and maritime regulations </li></ul>
    17. 17. TOTAL FALL FATALITIES Source: BLS Census of Fatal Occupational Injuries
    18. 18. TOTAL FALL FATALITIES Source: BLS Census of Fatal Occupational Injuries +28%
    19. 19. SPECIFIC ISSUES PER OSHA <ul><li>Fall protection on rolling stock and motor vehicles </li></ul><ul><li>Fall protection for employees standing or climbing on stacked materials (e.g., steel and precast concrete products) </li></ul><ul><li>Qualified climber </li></ul><ul><li>Building anchorages for rope descent systems </li></ul><ul><li>Technological advances in fall protection and fall arrest </li></ul>
    20. 20. AGENDA <ul><li>Background on regulation </li></ul><ul><li>OSHA’s reasons for changes and claims </li></ul><ul><li>Organization of the proposed rule FR notice </li></ul><ul><li>Summary of key issues </li></ul><ul><li>Next steps: take-aways </li></ul>
    21. 21. ORGANIZATION OF FR NOTICE <ul><li>I. Background </li></ul><ul><li>II. Analysis of Risk </li></ul><ul><li>III. Issues </li></ul><ul><li>IV. Summary and Explanation of the Proposed Rule </li></ul><ul><li>V. Preliminary Economic and Initial Regulatory Flexibility Screening Analysis </li></ul><ul><li>VI. Applicability of Existing National Consensus Standards </li></ul>
    22. 22. ORGANIZATION OF FR NOTICE-cont. <ul><li>VII. OMB Review Under the Paperwork Reduction Act of 1995 </li></ul><ul><li>VIII. Federalism </li></ul><ul><li>IX. State Plan States </li></ul><ul><li>X. Unfunded Mandates Reform Act </li></ul><ul><li>XI. Public Participation </li></ul><ul><li>XII. Authority and Signature </li></ul><ul><li>XIII. Proposed Regulatory Text </li></ul>
    23. 23. RECOMMENDED READING <ul><li>Proposed Regulatory Text: pages 29131 to 29153 </li></ul><ul><li>Issues: pages 28867 to 28870 </li></ul><ul><li>Summary & Explanation … Proposed Rule: pages 28870 to 28912 </li></ul><ul><li>Background: pages 28863 to 28865 </li></ul><ul><li>Applicability of … Consensus Standards: page 29128 </li></ul><ul><li>Analysis of Risk: pages 28865 to 28867 </li></ul>
    24. 24. SUBPART D - CONTENT <ul><li>29 CFR 1910.XX </li></ul><ul><li>.21 – Scope, application and definitions </li></ul><ul><li>.22 – General requirements </li></ul><ul><li>.23 – Ladders </li></ul><ul><li>.24 – Step bolts and manhole steps </li></ul><ul><li>.25 – Stairways </li></ul>
    25. 25. SUBPART D – CONTENT- cont. <ul><li>29 CFR 1910.XX </li></ul><ul><li>.26 – Dockboards </li></ul><ul><li>.27 – Scaffolds </li></ul><ul><li>.28 – Duty to have fall protection </li></ul><ul><li>.29 – Fall protection systems criteria and practices </li></ul><ul><li>.30 – Training requirements </li></ul><ul><li>** Refer to redesignation table on page 28870 </li></ul>
    26. 26. SUBPART I - CONTENT <ul><li>29 CFR 1910.XXX </li></ul><ul><li>.132 – General requirements </li></ul><ul><li>.140 – Fall protection systems </li></ul><ul><li>Appendix C – Personal Fall Protection Systems Non-Mandatory Guidelines </li></ul><ul><li>Appendix D – Test Methods and Procedures for Personal Fall Protection Systems Non-Mandatory Guidelines </li></ul>
    27. 27. WHAT IS CONSIDERED A HAZARD? <ul><li>§ 1910.28 Duty to have fall protection </li></ul><ul><li>§ 1910.29 Fall protection systems criteria and practices </li></ul><ul><li>Hazard surveys required under 1910.132 and the categories of falls listed under subpart D </li></ul>
    28. 28. HAZARD LOCATIONS <ul><li>§ 1910.28 Duty to have fall protection </li></ul><ul><ul><li>(b) Protection from fall hazards </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Unprotected sides and edges </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Hoist areas </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Holes </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Dockboards (bridge plates) </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Runways and similar walkways </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Dangerous equipment </li></ul></ul></ul>
    29. 29. HAZARD LOCATIONS <ul><li>§ 1910.28 Duty to have fall protection (cont.) </li></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Wall openings </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Repair, service, and assembly pits (pits) less than 10 feet in depth </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Fixed ladders </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Outdoor advertising (billboards) </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Stairways </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Scaffolds (including rope descent systems) </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Walking-working surfaces not otherwise addressed </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Protection for floor holes </li></ul></ul></ul>
    30. 30. HAZARD LOCATIONS <ul><li>§ 1910.29 Fall protection systems criteria and practices </li></ul><ul><ul><li>(b) Guardrail systems </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>(c) Safety net systems </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>(d) Designated areas </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>(e) Covers </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>(f) Handrail and stair rail systems </li></ul></ul>
    31. 31. HAZARD LOCATIONS <ul><li>§ 1910.29 Fall protection systems criteria and practices (cont.) </li></ul><ul><ul><li>(g) Cages, wells, and platforms used with fixed ladders </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>(h) Qualified Climbers </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>(i) Ladder safety systems </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>(j) Personal fall protection systems </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>(k) Protection from falling objects </li></ul></ul>
    32. 32. AGENDA <ul><li>Background on regulation </li></ul><ul><li>OSHA’s reasons for changes and claims </li></ul><ul><li>Organization of the proposed rule FR notice </li></ul><ul><li>Summary of key issues </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Items of interest – Top 10 </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Grandfather clause </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Notable omissions </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Exemptions </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Next steps: take-aways </li></ul>
    33. 33. ITEMS OF INTEREST – TOP 10 <ul><li>10. ANSI vs. OSHA </li></ul>
    34. 34. ITEMS OF INTEREST – TOP 10 <ul><li>10. ANSI vs. OSHA </li></ul><ul><li>9. OSHA is making 1910 consistent with 1926 and 1915 </li></ul><ul><ul><li>The good: easy for scaffolding </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>The bad: historical data from the BLS </li></ul></ul>
    35. 35. ITEMS OF INTEREST – TOP 10 <ul><li>10. ANSI vs. OSHA </li></ul><ul><li>9. OSHA is making 1910 consistent with 1926 and 1918 </li></ul><ul><li>8. Designating anchorages </li></ul>
    36. 36. ITEMS OF INTEREST – TOP 10 <ul><li>10. ANSI vs. OSHA </li></ul><ul><li>9. OSHA is making 1910 consistent with 1926 and 1918 </li></ul><ul><li>8. Designating anchorages </li></ul><ul><li>7. Number of fatalities this addresses </li></ul>
    37. 37. WHY UPDATE THE REGULATION? <ul><li>Prevent 20 workplace fatalities per year </li></ul><ul><li>Prevent over 3,700 injuries per year </li></ul><ul><li>From Fatal Falls summary: total (from height) – page 28866 </li></ul><ul><ul><li>1992-2004 (avg per year): 300 ( 213 ) </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>2005: 320 ( 257 ) </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>2006: 343 ( 285 ) </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>2007: 357 ( 267 ) </li></ul></ul>
    38. 38. ITEMS OF INTEREST – TOP 10 <ul><li>10. ANSI vs. OSHA </li></ul><ul><li>9. OSHA is making 1910 consistent with 1926 and 1918 </li></ul><ul><li>8. Designating anchorages </li></ul><ul><li>7. Number of fatalities this addresses </li></ul><ul><li>6. Lack of reference to STD1-1.13 </li></ul>
    39. 39. STD 1-1.13 <ul><li>Use fixed platforms when: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Work access is frequent, regular and predictable </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Frequency < once every two weeks </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Duration of access > four hours total in any sequential four-week period </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><li>OSHA is using the term ‘‘walking-working surfaces’’ instead of the existing term ‘‘floor’’ to indicate clearly that subpart D addresses all surfaces where employees perform work. </li></ul>
    40. 40. WALKING-WORKING SURFACES AND ROOFS <ul><li>Standard does not specify a distance from a roof edge at which fall protection is not required </li></ul><ul><li>Allows work to be done without guardrails </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Slaughtering facilities </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Loading racks </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Loading docks </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Teeming tables </li></ul></ul>
    41. 41. ITEMS OF INTEREST – TOP 10 <ul><li>5. Allows use of PFAS in situations where fall hazard is 4 feet </li></ul>
    42. 42. ITEMS OF INTEREST – TOP 10 <ul><li>5. Allows use of PFAS in situations where fall hazard is 4 feet </li></ul><ul><li>4. Unprotected edge issue and use of less protective in short term situations </li></ul><ul><ul><li>This proposed standard does not specify a distance from the edge that is considered safe, i.e., a distance at which fall protection is not required. Instead, it allows the employer to designate an area in which employees can work without fall protection . </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Vehicle maintenance pits </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Loading racks and other areas </li></ul></ul>
    43. 43. ITEMS OF INTEREST – TOP 10 <ul><li>5. Allows use of PFAS in situations where fall hazard is 4 feet </li></ul><ul><li>4. Unprotected edge issue and use of less protective in short term situations </li></ul><ul><li>3. Inconsistency for load rating of nets vs. fall arrest anchors </li></ul>
    44. 44. SAFETY NETS V. ANCHORAGES <ul><li>Two types of fall arrest systems: collective v. personal </li></ul><ul><li>Both support an impact force from a falling object </li></ul><ul><li>Both prevent the worker from striking the level below </li></ul><ul><li>Components for both types have a 5,000-pound capacity </li></ul>
    45. 45. SAFETY NETS V. ANCHORS <ul><li>Test weight used: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Nets: 400 pounds of sand </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Anchorages: 282 pound (formerly 220 pound) rigid weight </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Redundancy </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Nets: significant redundancy relative to structure, equipment and attachments </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Anchorages: single line and attachment location = no redundancy </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Determining strength and overall suitability </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Nets: subjected to a drop test or certified by the employer (or CP) </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Anchorages: Certified by a qualified person or able to support 5,000 pounds </li></ul></ul>
    46. 46. SAFETY NETS V. ANCHORAGES <ul><li>Safety nets: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>400 pound weight </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Redundancy in components, connections and structure </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Require drop test or analysis </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Fall arrest system: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>282 pound weight </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Little to no redundancy </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Eyeball or analysis </li></ul></ul>
    47. 47. ITEMS OF INTEREST – TOP 10 <ul><li>5. Allows use of PFAS in situations where fall hazard is 4 feet </li></ul><ul><li>4. Unprotected edge issue and use of less protective in short term situations </li></ul><ul><li>3. Inconsistency for load rating of nets vs. fall arrest anchors </li></ul><ul><li>2. Cost considerations </li></ul>
    48. 48. COST CONSIDERATIONS <ul><li>Two factors for compliance </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Cost associated with codifying the fall protection requirements where there was not clarity before </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Cost associated with bringing facilities into compliance where the previous requirements applied but were not put in place by the employer. </li></ul></ul>
    49. 49. COST CONSIDERATIONS <ul><li>Two factors for the cost of compliance </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Cost associated with codifying the fall protection requirements where there was not clarity before </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Cost associated with bringing facilities into compliance where the previous requirements applied but were not put in place by the employer. </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Costs in proposed document only includes #1, NOT #2. </li></ul>
    50. 50. ITEMS OF INTEREST – TOP 10 <ul><li>5. Allows use of PFAS in situations where fall hazard is 4 feet </li></ul><ul><li>4. Unprotected edge issue and use of less protective in short term situations </li></ul><ul><li>3. Inconsistency for load rating of nets vs. fall arrest anchors </li></ul><ul><li>Cost considerations </li></ul><ul><li>1. Grandfather clause </li></ul>
    51. 51. GRANDFATHER CLAUSE <ul><li>Grandfather clause for the following sections: </li></ul><ul><li>§ 1910.23(d)(2) – Fixed ladder design loads </li></ul><ul><li>§ 1910.24(a)(1) – step bolts corrosion </li></ul><ul><li>§ 1910.24(a)(7) – step bolt design load </li></ul><ul><li>§ 1910.24(b)(2) – manhole step requirements </li></ul><ul><li>§ 1910.25(a)(6) – door openings </li></ul><ul><li>§ 1910.26(b) – dock boards, equipment running of edge </li></ul><ul><li>§ 1910.29(f)(1)(ii) – height of stair rail systems > 36 inches </li></ul>
    52. 52. GUARDRAIL HEIGHT <ul><li>36-inch grandfather provision is not included in this proposal </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Nor does OSHA consider it to be equally safe to the &quot;42 inches nominal“ </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Any previous OSHA letters of interpretation are hereby superseded.” </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Proposed rule </li></ul><ul><ul><li>requires … 42 inches plus or minus 3 inches </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Parapets can be as low as 30 inches provided the sum of the depth and height is at least 48 inches </li></ul></ul><ul><li>See pages 28893 to 28895 for more on this issue </li></ul>
    53. 53. NOTABLE OMISSIONS <ul><li>Reference to STD 1-1.13 </li></ul><ul><li>Competent person authority </li></ul>
    54. 54. COMPETENT PERSON <ul><li>Identifies existing, foreseeable and predictable hazards </li></ul><ul><li>Has the authority to take prompt corrective measures to eliminate such hazards </li></ul>
    55. 55. NOTABLE OMISSIONS <ul><li>Reference to STD 1-1.13 </li></ul><ul><li>Competent person authority </li></ul><ul><li>Hierarchy of control observance </li></ul>
    56. 56. HIERARCHY OF CONTROL <ul><li>Employers can choose from several options </li></ul><ul><li>Can consider exposure time, availability of attachment points, feasibility and cost constraints </li></ul><ul><li>Removes hierarchy and establishes options that provide “equivalent protections” </li></ul><ul><li>OSHA has limited the employer’s choices to those that it believes will provide an equal level of safety </li></ul><ul><li>Guardrail height “equally safe” discussion </li></ul>
    57. 57. HIERARCHY OF CONTROL
    58. 58. FALL PROTECTION SYSTEM REQUIREMENTS <ul><li>“OSHA’s intent is that fall protection systems be installed, permanently where possible, so that the systems are in place and available for use whenever there is a potential exposure to fall hazards” </li></ul><ul><li>OSHA envisions employers will take a proactive approach to managing fall hazards </li></ul>
    59. 59. NOTABLE OMISSIONS <ul><li>Reference to STD 1-1.13 </li></ul><ul><li>Competent person authority </li></ul><ul><li>Hierarchy of control observance </li></ul><ul><li>Inspection exemption similar to 1926 </li></ul>
    60. 60. NOTABLE OMISSIONS <ul><li>Reference to STD 1-1.13 </li></ul><ul><li>Competent person authority </li></ul><ul><li>Hierarchy of control observance </li></ul><ul><li>Inspection exemption similar to 1926 </li></ul><ul><li>Load rating </li></ul>
    61. 61. NOTABLE OMISSIONS <ul><li>Snap hook gate strength </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Recent letter of interpretation from October 13, 2009 </li></ul></ul>
    62. 62. NOTABLE OMISSIONS <ul><li>Snap hook gate strength </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Recent letter of interpretation from October 13, 2009 </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Equipment for free fall > 6’ </li></ul>
    63. 63. NOTABLE OMISSIONS <ul><li>Snap hook gate strength </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Recent letter of interpretation from October 13, 2009 </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Equipment for free fall > 6’ </li></ul><ul><li>Heavy weight worker </li></ul>
    64. 64. NOTABLE OMISSIONS <ul><li>Snap hook gate strength </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Recent letter of interpretation from October 13, 2009 </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Equipment for free fall > 6’ </li></ul><ul><li>Heavy weight worker </li></ul><ul><li>Fall back on ladder safety devices is not addressed </li></ul><ul><li>SRL or VLL over an edge </li></ul>
    65. 65. NOTABLE OMISSIONS <ul><li>Snap hook gate strength </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Recent letter of interpretation from October 13, 2009 </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Equipment for free fall > 6’ </li></ul><ul><li>Heavy weight worker </li></ul><ul><li>Fall back on ladder safety devices is not addressed </li></ul><ul><li>SRL or VLL over an edge </li></ul><ul><li>More on rescue </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Safety and Health Information Bulletin from 2004. </li></ul></ul>
    66. 66. EXEMPTIONS <ul><li>Standard stairs </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Does not cover: </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Floating roof tanks </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Scaffolds </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Designed into a machine </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Self propelled motorized mobile equipment </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><li>Load racks </li></ul><ul><li>Dockboards if used exclusively with motorized equipment </li></ul><ul><li>Ladders used in firefighting or rescue operations </li></ul>
    67. 67. EXEMPTIONS <ul><li>Repair, service, and assembly pits less than 10 feet in depth. </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Access within 6’ of edge limited to trained authorized employees </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Floor marked to designate unprotected area </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Cautions signs posted to warn </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>If 10’ or more, conventional fall protection must be used </li></ul></ul>
    68. 68. AGENDA <ul><li>Background on regulation </li></ul><ul><li>OSHA’s reasons for changes and claims </li></ul><ul><li>Organization of the proposed rule FR notice </li></ul><ul><li>Summary of key issues </li></ul><ul><li>Next steps: take-aways </li></ul>
    69. 69. INPUT REQUESTS <ul><li>Fall protection on rolling stock and motor vehicles </li></ul><ul><li>Fall protection for standing on stacked materials </li></ul><ul><li>Qualified climber </li></ul><ul><li>Building anchorages for rope descent systems </li></ul><ul><li>Technological advances in fall protection and fall arrest </li></ul>
    70. 70. SUBMITTING COMMENTS <ul><li>Due August 23, 2010 </li></ul><ul><li>Submit electronically online, fax or regular mail </li></ul><ul><li>Include Docket No. OSHA-2007-0072 </li></ul>
    71. 71. LEARNING OBJECTIVES <ul><li>Summarize the content of the proposed regulation. </li></ul><ul><li>Identify key issues with proposed regulation. </li></ul><ul><li>State actions to assist your organization in implementation. </li></ul>
    72. 72. CALL TO ACTION <ul><li>Read Proposed Regulatory Text (pages 29131 to 29153) </li></ul><ul><li>Submit comments that either address the issues that OSHA has identified or affects your industry. </li></ul><ul><li>Implement ANSI Z359.2 </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Fall hazard survey report </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Procedures </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Training requirements </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Work to eliminate all fall hazards </li></ul>
    73. 73. THANK YOU FOR YOUR TIME <ul><li>To learn more about fall protection from LJB Inc. </li></ul><ul><li>Follow-up webinar: Fall hazard risk assessments </li></ul><ul><ul><li>October 12 and 14, 2010 </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Blog </li></ul><ul><ul><li>http://www.ljbfallprotectionblog.com </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Podcasts – 60 Seconds for Safety </li></ul><ul><ul><li>http:// www.ljbinc.com/safetybydesign </li></ul></ul><ul><li>YouTube video </li></ul><ul><ul><li>http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Dk7F8UJxnLU </li></ul></ul>
    74. 74. OSHA PROPOSED SUBPART D & I: WALKING-WORKING SURFACES AND PPE

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