Facility Fall Protection: Roof and Facade Maintenance
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Facility Fall Protection: Roof and Facade Maintenance

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LJB Inc. provided this webinar to give an overview on roof fall protection regulations, as well as common fall hazards and abatement solutions.

LJB Inc. provided this webinar to give an overview on roof fall protection regulations, as well as common fall hazards and abatement solutions.

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  • STD 1-1.13 – Fall protection in general industry Definition of walking / working surface: Any surface used primarily as a walking / working surface Surface upon which workers are required or allowed to walk or work while performing assigned tasks on a predictable / regular basis.
  • STD 1-1.13 – Fall protection in general industry Definition of walking / working surface: Any surface used primarily as a walking / working surface Surface upon which workers are required or allowed to walk or work while performing assigned tasks on a predictable / regular basis.
  • 15 feet or more from edge Meets or exceeds OSHA 1926.502(f)(2) No work activity within 15 feet of roof edge (between warning line and roof edge) Work rule prohibits workers from going outside warning line
  • 15 feet or more from edge Meets or exceeds OSHA 1926.502(f)(2) No work activity within 15 feet of roof edge (between warning line and roof edge) Work rule prohibits workers from going outside warning line
  • STD 1-1.13 – Fall protection in general industry Definition of walking / working surface: Any surface used primarily as a walking / working surface Surface upon which workers are required or allowed to walk or work while performing assigned tasks on a predictable / regular basis.
  • The last consideration for roof fall protection is work classification. Different OSHA regulations apply to construction and maintenance activities, both of which often occur on roofs. Repairing or patching a roof would fall under general industry, while roof replacement would fall under the construction regulation. It is important to recognize this distinction and ensure you are applying the appropriate regulatory requirements to these different activities.
  • STD 1-1.13 – Fall protection in general industry Definition of walking / working surface: Any surface used primarily as a walking / working surface Surface upon which workers are required or allowed to walk or work while performing assigned tasks on a predictable / regular basis.
  • STD 1-1.13 – Fall protection in general industry Definition of walking / working surface: Any surface used primarily as a walking / working surface Surface upon which workers are required or allowed to walk or work while performing assigned tasks on a predictable / regular basis.
  • STD 1-1.13 – Fall protection in general industry Definition of walking / working surface: Any surface used primarily as a walking / working surface Surface upon which workers are required or allowed to walk or work while performing assigned tasks on a predictable / regular basis.
  • STD 1-1.13 – Fall protection in general industry If workers are exposed more than once every two weeks, or more than four hours over a four-week period, then engineering controls (guardrail) must be used as the primary fall protection. If workers are exposed less frequently, then you are permitted to use other means of fall protection, such as active fall protection which includes personal fall arrest systems (PFAS)
  • STD 1-1.13 – Fall protection in general industry Definition of walking / working surface: Any surface used primarily as a walking / working surface Surface upon which workers are required or allowed to walk or work while performing assigned tasks on a predictable / regular basis.
  • What classification, safe distance and solution would you apply here?
  • Advantages: eng control, Dis: requires ground access, limited reach,
  • Adv: eng control Dis: ground access, cost
  • Adv: access from roof, permanent, work faster Dis:Use PPE, training, ongoing maintenance
  • Back of this building is not accessible due to the grade. They changed the grade to allow aerial lift access as well as to permit scaffold to be built.
  • Plenty of OSHA regulations and ANSI standards to provide general guidance Not going to attempt to explain all of them today, but be happy to answer questions Want to show some practical ways to AVOID fall hazards on roofs And why it’s important to do so I’ll start with that.

Facility Fall Protection: Roof and Facade Maintenance Facility Fall Protection: Roof and Facade Maintenance Presentation Transcript

  • FACILITY FALL PROTECTION:ROOF & FAÇADE MAINTENANCE LJB WEBINAR – NOVEMBER 2012 MEG PHILLIPS, P.E., C.S.P. MPHILLIPS@LJBINC.COM; 513-582-4782
  • ROOF FALL HAZARDS 200 180 160 140 Roofs 120 Ladders 100 Scaffolds 80 Non-moving 60 vehicles StrucSteel 40 20 0 2002 2004 2006 2008 2010 Source: BLS Census of Fatal Occupational Injuries2
  • BOTTOM LINE UPFRONT Roof fall protection is challenging > Various regulations > Abatement strategies You need a plan for: > Access and safe distance policies > Hazard identification > Hazard abatement3
  • AGENDA Safe distance Work classification Common hazards Abatement strategies > Roof > Facade Closing4
  • SAFE DISTANCE? OSHA 1910 OSHA 1926 OSHA 1926 roofing non-roofing5
  • SAFE DISTANCE? OSHA 1910 OSHA 1926 OSHA 1926 roofing non-roofing Proposed 19106
  • SAFE DISTANCE? OSHA 1910 OSHA 1926 OSHA 1926 roofing non-roofing Proposed 19107
  • SAFE DISTANCE? OSHA 1910 OSHA 1926 OSHA 1926 roofing non-roofing Proposed Mech. Equip. 1910 Exception8
  • SAFE DISTANCE? OSHA 1910 OSHA 1926 OSHA 1926 roofing non-roofing Proposed Mech. Equip. 1910 Exception9
  • SAFE DISTANCE? OSHA 1910 OSHA 1926 OSHA 1926 roofing non-roofing Proposed Mech. Equip. 1910 Exception 15 feet de minimis10
  • OSHA 1910 OSHA 1910 does not provide a safe distance from the edge Proposed OSHA 1910 - Designated area > Perimeter shall be erected no less than 10 feet from the unprotected side or edge11
  • OSHA 1926: ROOFING OSHA (sec 1926.502(f)(1)ii) - “the warning line shall be erected not less than 6 feet from the roof edge which is parallel… not less than 10 feet…perpendicular to the direction of mechanical equipment operation.” Other exceptions: OSHA (sec 1926.500(a)(2) & 1926.501(b)(1-14)) > Some leading edge work > Precast concrete erection > Residential construction12
  • OSHA 1926: NON-ROOFING No safe distance OSHA letter of interpretation > For trades other than roofing, warning lines at 15 feet will be a de minimis violation • Roofing Work and Other Trades on Low-Slope Roof (August 1, 2000) • Warning line at 6 feet for HVAC construction workers (November 15, 2002)13
  • OSHA 1926: NON-ROOFING Warning lines must meet 4 criteria > 15 feet or more from roof edge > Meet or exceed OSHA 1926.502(f)(2) > No work activity within 15 feet of roof edge > Work rules prohibit workers from going outside warning line14
  • INTERNATIONAL BUILDING CODE IBC (sec 1012.5) - “Guards shall be provided where appliances, equipment, fans or other components that require service are located within 10 feet of a roof edge.”15
  • AGENDA Safe distance Work classification Common hazards Abatement strategies > Roof > Facade Closing16
  • OSHA WORK CLASSIFICATION17
  • WHICH CLASSIFICATION?18
  • WHICH CLASSIFICATION?19
  • AGENDA Safe distance Work classification Common hazards Abatement strategies > Roof > Facade Closing20
  • COMMON HAZARDS - ROOFS Means of access21
  • COMMON HAZARDS - ROOFS Openings22
  • COMMON HAZARDS - ROOFS Working near edge23
  • COMMON HAZARDS - ROOFS Hoist areas24
  • COMMON HAZARDS – FAÇADE Window cleaning and maintenance Architectural treatments Flags/banners25
  • AGENDA Common hazards Safety requirements Abatement strategies > Roofs > Façades Closing26
  • HIERARCHY OF CONTROL Elimination Substitution Engineering controls Effectiveness Administrative controls Personal protective equipment (PPE) Defeatability27
  • LETTERS OF INTERPRETATION - OSHA Roof access openings require protection (July 12, 2000) > Guardrail for roof hatch openings Fall protection requirements for roof construction (Dec. 15, 2003) > Use of warning lines for low slope roof work vs. other trades28
  • ABATEMENT OPTIONS - OSHA29
  • OSHA STD 1-1.13 – DEFINITION Any surface designed or used as a walking / working surface >For tasks performed on a predictable / regular basis30
  • OSHA STD 1-1.13 – REQUIREMENTS FREQUENT TASKS: > More than 1x every 2 weeks > More than 4 hours over 4 week period > Required to use engineering controls (guardrail) LESS FREQUENT TASKS: > Permitted to use alternative fall protection such as a personal fall arrest systems (PFAS)31
  • AGENDA Safe distance Work classification Common hazards Abatement strategies > Roof > Facade Closing32
  • ELIMINATION/SUBSTITUTION Place HVAC units on the ground Design considerations for roof access via aerial lift33
  • ENGINEERING CONTROLS Guardrail > Fixed > Portable Lifts Fixed scaffold34
  • ROOF PLAN35
  • ROOF HATCH36
  • ROOF FANS & SMOKE VENTS37
  • SKYLIGHTS38
  • ADMINISTRATIVE CONTROLS Roof permit system > Primary vs. secondary control > Implementation > Training > Monitoring39
  • ROOF PLAN40
  • THIS ISN’T WARNING LINE41
  • DESIGNATED AREAS Proposed OSHA 1910 - Designated area > Work of temporary nature such as maintenance on HVAC > Use warning line as alternative to installing guardrails > Surface slope must be 10 degrees or less > Perimeter shall be erected no less than 10 feet from the unprotected side or edge > Access to designated area must be clear path with warning lines42
  • PPE Roof edge > Fall restraint or arrest • Rail • HLL • Anchor points with lifeline43
  • PPE: ANCHORAGE POINTS Fixed anchorage > Structural steel? > HVAC unit? > HVAC curb? Temporary anchorage > Ballasted anchor?44
  • PPE SOLUTIONS Did you consider? > Anchorage strength > Fall clearance > Swing fall > Proper application > Procedures and training > Rescue45
  • REVIEW What classification, safe distance and solution would you apply here?46
  • FINAL ABATEMENT47
  • AGENDA Safe distance Work classification Common hazards Abatement strategies > Roof > Facade Closing48
  • FAÇADE MAINTENANCE Aerial work platforms Supported scaffold Suspended systems49
  • AERIAL WORK PLATFORMS50
  • SUPPORTED SCAFFOLD51
  • SUSPENDED SYSTEMS52
  • INDEPENDENT ANCHORAGES Capable of supporting 5,000 pounds Located directly over the point of suspension53
  • SUSPENDED SCAFFOLD ANCHORAGES SAFE POINTS Structural members determined by qualified person UNSAFE POINTS Standpipes Vents Other piping systems Electrical conduit Outrigger beams Counterweights54
  • SUSPENDED SCAFFOLD OPTIONS55
  • SUSPENDED SCAFFOLD OPTIONS56
  • ANSI I-14.1 WINDOW CLEANING STANDARD Withdrawn by ANSI > Revised standard being prepared by IWCA committee. Independent anchorage for suspension lines and lifelines Roof anchorage must be designed for the greater of 5,000 pounds or 4x the maximum applied load 15º rigging angle from point of suspension Annual anchorage inspection57
  • AGENDA Safe distance Work classification Common hazards Abatement strategies > Roof > Facade Closing58
  • ACTION ITEMS Evaluate your program’s safe distance policies Educate others about safe distances and work classifications Evaluate or develop a roof permit system59
  • TO LEARN MORE Blog > thespot.ljbinc.com/category/safety Past webinars > Slideshare.net/kmesser Twitter > @LJBInc60