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Essential Elements of a Managed Fall Protection Program
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Essential Elements of a Managed Fall Protection Program

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This webinar provides guidance on the foundational elements of a managed fall protection program. Key topics include evaluation and control of fall hazards and the uses and limitations of equipment. …

This webinar provides guidance on the foundational elements of a managed fall protection program. Key topics include evaluation and control of fall hazards and the uses and limitations of equipment.

With something as critical as fall protection, the difference between an effective and an ineffective program can be the difference between life and death.

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  • Discuss how I love fall protection. While it is something that is just a part of your job, I, as well as many other at LJB, have dedicated our career to this topic. That is the reasons you see that I am registered as a PE and CSP. In fp, you never have a project that is completely safety or completely engineering. No matter what the solution, there are always aspects of both that need to be considered. For example for a personal fall arrest system, there are obvious structural aspects like the design of the rail or horizontal lifeline to which you attach, the connection to thee building structure, the building structure itself. On the other hand, making sure that a fall arrest system should even be used, is a safety related item. Same as specifying the correct equipment, procedures and training.
  • First put on harnesses – awkward 2 rescues PPE rescue from fall Get to medical attention 2 pts. rescue (pre-plan) anchorage
  • First put on harnesses – awkward 2 rescues PPE rescue from fall Get to medical attention 2 pts. rescue (pre-plan) anchorage
  • Most of these items are taken from OSHA’s description of typical hazards encountered.
  • Employees generally do a good job of not climbing ladders with materials in their hands, although when they get to the top of the ladder, they reach over the edge to haul up the material. Also, if there is a group of people accessing the roof, they tend to gather at the ladder whether they are ascending or descending the ladder.
  • Question to class: How far away from a fall hazard is considered safe? 6’? 10’? Actually, OSHA does not give a distance and considers any WWS without fall protection a hazard. Discuss 6’ and 10’ distances and exposure to hazard based on discussions with OSHA.
  • First put on harnesses – awkward 2 rescues PPE rescue from fall Get to medical attention 2 pts. rescue (pre-plan) anchorage
  • Agenda for this module
  • Agenda for this module
  • Agenda for this module
  • Ask “which part of strap is load bearing, which is for abrasion protection?” “If there was just a hole in just the abrasion webbing, would you pass it?” Possibly not.
  • First put on harnesses – awkward 2 rescues PPE rescue from fall Get to medical attention 2 pts. rescue (pre-plan) anchorage
  • First put on harnesses – awkward 2 rescues PPE rescue from fall Get to medical attention 2 pts. rescue (pre-plan) anchorage
  • I edited this slide to make it easier to process/remember.
  • Transcript

    • 1. ESSENTIAL ELEMENTS OF AMANAGED FALL PROTECTION PROGRAM TRACEY RIEPENHOFF, P.E., C.S.P., P.M.P. - PRINCIPAL TRiepenhoff@LJBInc.com; Phone: (419) 225-5995 MARCH 2012
    • 2. INTRODUCTIONTracey Riepenhoff, P.E., C.S.P., P.M.P. > Principal in LJB Safety division > 20 years experience in fall protection industry > Past member: ANSI Z359 Committee > ASSE Top 100 Women in Safety > Frequent speaker at regional and national conferences 2
    • 3. BOTTOM LINE UPFRONTThe difference between an effective and an ineffective programcan be the difference between life and death. 3
    • 4. LEARNING OBJECTIVESDiscuss the core elements of a fall protection programApply the Hierarchy of Control when evaluating and controllingfall hazardsList common uses and limitations of PPEIdentify action steps to improve an existing fall protectionprogram 4
    • 5. CALL TO ACTION1. Evaluate your current practice for fall hazard identification • Existing hazards • Future hazards2. Determine how abatement solutions are selected3. Identify who needs competent person training 5
    • 6. PROGRAM CORE ELEMENTSManagement leadership and employee participationHazard identification and evaluationHazard abatementTrainingProgram evaluation 6
    • 7. PROGRAM CORE ELEMENTSManagement leadership and employee participationHazard identification and evaluationHazard abatementTrainingProgram evaluation 7
    • 8. WHAT DO YOU LOOK FOR?Fall hazard categories> Means of access> Locations> Tasks> Improper use of PPE 8
    • 9. MEANS OF ACCESS 9
    • 10. LOCATIONS – ROOF EDGE 10
    • 11. LOCATIONS – TOP OF TANK 11
    • 12. TASKS – MEZZANINE GUARDRAILS 12
    • 13. IMPROPER USE OF PPE 13
    • 14. 14
    • 15. 15
    • 16. 16
    • 17. HAZARD EVALUATIONPrioritize risk Probability > What is the chance you are going to fall? >Frequency >Likelihood of a fall Severity > What will happen to you if you fall? 17
    • 18. WHERE IS YOUR GREATEST RISK?Risk 123… Hazard Rank …5206 18
    • 19. WHERE IS YOUR GREATEST RISK? 32% of risk in top 1% of hazardsRisk 77% of risk in top 10% of hazards 98% of risk in top 50% of hazards 123… Hazard Rank …5206 19
    • 20. PROGRAM CORE ELEMENTSManagement leadership and employee participationHazard identification and evaluationHazard abatementTrainingProgram evaluation 20
    • 21. HOW DO YOU PICK? HIERARCHY OF CONTROL Elimination Substitution Engineering controlsEffectiveness Administrative controls Personal protective equipment (PPE) Defeatability 21
    • 22. ELIMINATIONBEFORE AFTER 22
    • 23. SUBSTITUTIONBEFORE AFTER 23
    • 24. ENGINEERING CONTROLSGuardrail 24
    • 25. ABCs (& R) WHEN USING PPEA = AnchorageB = Body supportC = Connecting meansR = Rescue 25
    • 26. ABCs (& R)Anchorage> Restraint> Positioning> Arrest> Horizontal lifeline> RescueBCR 26
    • 27. ABCs (& R)AnchorageBody support> Full body harness> Body belts (DO NOT USE!!!)> Weight limitationCR 27
    • 28. ABCs (& R)AnchorageBody supportConnecting means> Connectors> Lanyards and energy absorbers> Self retracting devices> Vertical systems> Anchorage connectorsR 28
    • 29. NEW EQUIPMENT STANDARDS1. ANSI Z359.12-2009: connectors2. ANSI Z359.13-2009: energy absorbers and lanyards3. ANSI Z359.14-2012: self-retracting devices4. ANSI Z359.17-20XX: horizontal lifelines5. ANSI Z359.11-20XX: harnesses6. At least three others in coming years.Available from www.asse.org 29
    • 30. ABCs (& R)AnchorageBody supportConnecting meansRescue> Self-rescue> Assisted rescue (internal)> Assisted rescue (emergency response)> Professional rope access 30
    • 31. PROMPT RESCUEFactors to consider in planning forresponse > Hanging vertically in a harness can cause loss of consciousness even in the absence of trauma or blood loss > The body’s tolerance to suspension trauma varies from person to person > Rescuing a worker quickly post fall is at least as critical as protecting the worker from a fall From “Does 911 Work for Rescue?” by Robert N. AP Photo by Janet B. Campbell Aguiluz (September 2003) Erie Times-News, 5/25/2004 31
    • 32. FALL ARREST: RESIDUAL RISKInappropriate anchorageFall distanceSwing fallEquipment malfunction / failureMaximum arrest forcePost-fall suspension timeRescue 32
    • 33. FALL CLEARANCEFree fall +Deceleration distance +Harness effect +Safety margin 33
    • 34. SWING FALLAnchorage needs to bemaintained overhead HIMaintain anchorageconnector with 15º overthe location of thedorsal d-ring 34
    • 35. EQUIPMENT INSPECTIONTypes1. Pre-use: daily when used2. Formal: every 6 to 12 months3. Incident: as part of incident investigation 35
    • 36. EQUIP. INSPECTION – WEBBING HOLE 36
    • 37. SYSTEM INSPECTION 37
    • 38. PROCEDURES 38
    • 39. PROGRAM CORE ELEMENTSManagement leadership and employee participationHazard identification and evaluationHazard abatementTrainingProgram evaluation 39
    • 40. PROGRAM ROLES PROGRAM ADMINISTRATOR QUALIFIED PERSON Policy development System planning and design System integration Program evaluation COMPETENT PERSON COMPETENT RESCUER System implementation, periodic inspection and useAUTHORIZED PERSON AUTHORIZED PERSON AUTHORIZED AUTHORIZED RESCUER RESCUER System use and daily inspection 40
    • 41. DO YOU HAVE THESE?Training programs Awareness Authorized person > System-specific Competent person Qualified person Rescue 41
    • 42. PROGRAM CORE ELEMENTSManagement leadership and employee participationHazard identification and evaluationHazard abatementTrainingProgram evaluation 42
    • 43. CALL TO ACTION1. Evaluate your current practice for fall hazard identification • Existing hazards • Future hazards2. Determine how abatement solutions are selected3. Identify who needs competent person training 43
    • 44. THANK YOU FOR JOINING USBlog > LJBfallprotectionblog.comPast webinars > Slideshare.net/kmesserTwitter > @LJBIncYouTube channel > Youtube.com/LJBinc 44