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PHONING IT IN:
USING CLASSROOM
RESPONSE SYSTEMS
Kristina De Voe, Eng...
2
Image by Rob Swatski. Available at https://flic.kr/p/cK7qFw
 CLASSROOM RESPONSE SYSTEMS
 POLL EVERYWHERE
 TYPES OF QU...
Image by Tadeeej. Available at https://flic.kr/p/5Vj5Nf
LOOK FAMILIAR?
Image by allegraxoheart. Available at https://flic.kr/p/9fZJky
HOW ABOUT THIS?
Image by Earthworm. Available at https://flic.kr/p/fjVHCX
WHY CLASSROOM RESPONSE SYSTEMS ?
Image by Scott McLeod. Available at https://flic.kr/p/bTQwfx
ALLOW STUDENTS TO ANSWER MULTIPLE CHOICE OR
FREE RESPONSE QUESTIONS
Image by Oliver Tacke Available at https://flic.kr/p/j...
ENABLE STUDENTS TO RESPOND ANONYMOUSLY
Image by Adam Bronkhorst. Available at http://bit.ly/1lWd1o0
INIVITE STUDENTS TO THINK INDIVIDUALLY
Image by Jorund Myhre. Available at https://flic.kr/p/6iy46e
TEST STUDENTS’ RETENTION OF CONCEPTS
Image by cohdra. Available at http://mrg.bz/966s7I
DISPLAY RESULTS IMMEDIATELY
Image by Klas-Goran Photo. Available at https://flic.kr/p/gouj3k
WEB BASED
FREE FOR INSTRUCTORS &
STUDENTS
(first 40 responses)
CREATES
MULTIPLE
CHOICE & FREE-
TEXT POLLS
INTEGRATES EASIL...
 PRI CING
 RE LI ABILITY
 E XPE RI ENCE
 WAY S TO RE SPON D
 POLL FUN CTI ON ALITY
 MULTI PLE
 FRE E -TE XT
 VI SU...
Image by @Doug88888. Available at https://flic.kr/p/5uZ6s8
LIMITATIONS
TYPES OF QUESTIONS
Image by missyredboots. Available at http://mrg.bz/L5i2uh
CONTENT
QUESTIONS
D I R E C T L Y A S S E S S
S T U D E N T L E A R N I N G
PROCESS
QUESTIONS
G A T H E R I N F O F R O M ...
CONTENT QUESTIONS
RECALL
QUESTIONS
APPLICATION
QUESTIONS
CRITICAL THINKING
QUESTIONS
FREE RESPONSE
QUESTIONS
CONCEPTUAL
UN...
RECALL
Image by dave. Available at http://mrg.bz/f0ENQW
 WHERE IN THE LIBRARY DO YOU GO TO
CHECK-OUT BOOKS?
 HOW LONG CAN YOU CHECK OUT A DVD?
 WHAT IS THE URL FOR THE LIBRARY...
CONCEPTUAL UNDERSTANDING
 WHAT IS THE JOURNAL TITLE IN THIS CITATION?
Buchman, Dana. “A Special Education.”
Good Housekeeping Mar. 2006: 143-48. P...
APPLICATION
Image by nesquivel. Available at http://mrg.bz/ZuuvhN
EXAMPLES
 HOW MUCH ADVANCE TIME DID YOU GIVE
YOURSELF TO RESEARCH FOR YOUR LAST
PAPER?
• TWO WEEKS
• ONE WEEK
• 2-3 DAYS
...
CRITICAL THINKING
Image available at http://www.leftcoastrebel.com/
EXAMPLES
 WHICH DO YOU THINK IS THE BEST
COMBINATION OF KEYWORDS TO SEARCH
FOR INFORMATION ABOUT THE EFFECTS OF
THE MEDIA...
FREE RESPONSE
Image by John. Available at https://flic.kr/p/e4nryS
EXAMPLES
 WHEN IT COMES TO PUBLIC OPINION
POLLS, WHAT MAKES YOU TRUST NUMERIC
DATA?
 GIVE A SITUATION WHEN YOU WOULD
CHO...
CONTENT QUESTIONS
RECALL
QUESTIONS
APPLICATION
QUESTIONS
CRITICAL THINKING
QUESTIONS
FREE RESPONSE
QUESTIONS
CONCEPTUAL
UN...
PROCESS QUESTIONS
STUDENT
PERSPECTIVE
QUESTIONS
CONFIDENCE LEVEL
QUESTIONS
MONITORING
QUESTIONS
CLASSROOM
EXPERIMENT
QUEST...
BEST PRACTICES
Image by R. E. ~. Available at http://bit.ly/1oBF1ik
BEST PRACTICES
 EXPLAIN TO STUDENTS WHY YOU’RE USING CRS
 ALIGN QUESTION TO LEARNING OUTCOMES –
DON’T USE TECH FOR THE S...
BEST PRACTICES
 KEEP WORDING OF QUESTIONS SIMPLE
 BUILD IN TIME FOR DISCUSSION AND
DEBRIEFING DURING AND FOLLOWING
EACH ...
Image by Rob Swatski. Available at https://flic.kr/p/cvsHxy
Image by ramyo. Available at https://flic.kr/p/5Bj6fT
QUESTIONS?
THANK YOU!
Slidedeck available at:
slideshare.net/kmdevoe
Phoning It In: Using Classroom Response Systems
Phoning It In: Using Classroom Response Systems
Phoning It In: Using Classroom Response Systems
Phoning It In: Using Classroom Response Systems
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Phoning It In: Using Classroom Response Systems

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Presentation given at the Temple University Teaching with Technology Symposium, Spring 2014.

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  • In this presentation, I will:Discuss what classroom response systems are and their benefitsHighlight a web-based tool called Poll Everywhere and demo how easy it is to useDiscuss the types of questions that can be asked in any classroom setting, providing examplesOffer some best practices for implementing classroom response systems into your own classroom settings
  • If this image looks familiar in some of your classes,
  • Or if students seem to be less engaged, it may be a good opportunity to add something new to your teaching toolkit
  • In order to foster more active, reflective classroom environments, try integrating classroom response systems into your toolkit.
  • Why classroom response systems?
  • Classroom response systems allow students to answer multiple choice or free response questions
  • Classroom response systems enable students to respond anonymously
  • Classroom response systems invite students to think individually – their answers are not influenced by the input of other students
  • Classroom response systems test students’ retention of concepts
  • Classroom response systems display polling results immediately
  • Options for using the devices that students already have or may have: their hands, actual clicker devices (like the ones created by TurningPoint), and mobile devicesPerks and pitfalls of each:Hands: Perk – Inexpensive, easy, and quickPitfall – Aura of anonymity is removed; cannot easily collect responses for later assessmentClickers:Perk – dynamic; interactive; can collect responses for later assessmentPitfall – Expense of purchasing device (borne by student and/or university); can be lost/grow legs; requires software downloaded on computer workstation; some older versions can only accommodate multiple choice polls; some learning curve for students/instructorsMobile devices:Perk – Many students already own a device and know how to use it, reducing technology fees; can often collect responses for later assessment; dynamic; versatile; interactive; fun factorPitfall – Some students may not own a device or, if they do, may have forgotten to bring it to class; any related texting or data service fees; web/tech snafus; tempting distraction
  • Poll Everywhere - http://www.polleverywhere.com/
  • Poll Everywhere:Is web-basedIs free for instructors and students to use (at least the first 40 responses are free; no limit on the number of polls can create)Utilizes technology that students already haveCreates multiple choice and free-text pollsIntegrates with other instructional tools, such as MS PowerPoint and Apple’s KeynoteEnables students to have a more reflective voice in the classroom, especially with the use of the free-text polls
  • Three easy steps to poll students in real-time:Ask audience a question with the Poll Everywhere appAudience answers in real time using mobile phones, Twitter, or web browserSee your response live on the web or in a PowerPoint or Keynote presentationDemonstration of how to create and edit various polls, plus how to make them available to students
  • Demonstration of how to create and edit various polls, plus how to make them available to students
  • On the Poll Everywhere website, there is a chart available, comparing Poll Everywhere with other, similar web-based classroom response systems. Some of the categories used to compare include pricing, reliability, experience, ways to respond, poll functionality (multiple, free-text, visuals), support, etc.
  • There are limitations to Poll Everywhere, of course:Students may not have device with or own oneCosts associated with textingUnpredictability aspect – students can and will type just about everythingWeb/Techunpredictability
  • Types of QuestionsHavingand using classroom response systems is great, but it is the kinds of questions you ask which are more important to creating effective learning environmentsAsking good questions can be tricky
  • In his book, Teaching with Classroom Response Systems, Derek Bruff categorizes types of questions to employ with classroom response systems into two main categories: Content Questions Process Questions Content questions directly assess student learning and can be used during and following instruction Process questions gather information from students on how they interact with each other and interpret course material. Think of them as meta-cognitive, “in the moment” questions.
  • There are five (5) types of Content questions: Recall Questions Conceptual Understanding Questions Application Questions Critical Thinking Questions Free Response Questions
  • Recallquestions: asks students to remember facts, concepts proceduresDoes not assess students’ understanding, merely their memory Does not often generate productive class discussions
  • Examples:Where in the library do you go to check out books?How long can you check out a DVD?What is the url for the library catalog?
  • Conceptual understanding questions: Asks students to recall facts and associate concepts Useful for uncovering student misconceptions
  • Examples:What is the journal title in this citation?Buchman, Dana. “A Special Education.” Good Housekeeping Mar. 2006: 143-48. Print. A Special Education Good Housekeeping PrintWhich of the following statements best explains an abstract? An abstract is a summary of an article An abstract is bibliographic information (author, title, journal title, etc.) An abstract is a quote from an article
  • Application questions: Asks students to recall rules/theories and then apply them to concrete scenarios Allows students to make connections between course content and personal lives Common types of application questions include procedural and prediction questions
  • Examples:How much advance time did you give yourself to research for your last paper? two weeks one week 2-3 days I started the night before the paper was due followed byPredict how much time you think your classmates gave themselves.
  • Critical thinking questions: Requires students to analyze relationships among multiple concepts or make evaluations based on specific criteria Students’ reasoning is valued more than actual answer Lends itself more to free-response questions rather than multiple choice multiple choice questions worded as “one-best answer questions” can work well too
  • Examples:Which do you think is the best combination of keywords to search for information about the effects of the media on teenagers’ perceptions of body image? body image and media teenagers and body image and television teenagers and body image and media (teens or teenagers) and body image and media
  • Free response questions: Assesses students’ abilities to create, generate, or produce something responses can be trickier to aggregate and may require additional time to make sense of
  • Examples:When it comes to public opinion polls, what makes you trust the numeric data?Give a situation when you would choose to quote a source versus paraphrase a source.
  • Content questions progress on a spectrum, gradually becoming more engaging and critical as students recall content, apply to their own lives, put into practice, and create something new
  • PROCESS QUESTIONSProcess questions are used to gather info form students on how they interact with one another in class and with course content. They DO NOT assess student learning. They are largely for instructor – gauge how things are going in the moment. They help instructor get to know students more – experience levels, background, etc. Can serve as backchannel.STUDENT PERSPECTIVE QUESTIONSHelp instructors get to know their students (also useful for students to get to know one another, too)Helps instructors tailor learning experiences to the unique makeup of students in the momentUseful at the beginning of a class, similar to an ice-breakerMight be questions related to student demographics, opinions, or personal/past experiencesCONFIDENCE LEVEL QUESTIONSGets students to assess their own learning (What do I know, not know?)Can piggyback off of a content question (e.g. “How confident are you in your answer to the previous questions?”)MONITORING QUESTIONSCan serve to monitor aspects of student learning experience beyond comprehension and confidence levels. Can serve as backchannel during lecture/lesson (e.g. “How am I doing?” “How are you doing?”)CLASSROOM EXPERIMENT QUESTIONSOften used to facilitate classroom experiments (like in the social sciences)
  • Best Practices
  • Best PracticesExplain to students why you’re using classroom response systemsAlign question to learning outcomes – don’t use technology for the sake of technologyConsider number and types of questions used3-4 questions per 50minute session, spaced 10-20 minutes apart is a good rule of thumb
  • Best Practices, contd.Keep wording of questions simpleBuild in time for discussion and debriefing during and following each question (try using think-pair-share and/or re-polling techniques)Collect and analyze data for future revisions
  • Questions? Thank you!Slidedeck available at: slideshare.net/kmdevoe
  • Transcript of "Phoning It In: Using Classroom Response Systems"

    1. 1. Image by ramyo. Available at https://flic.kr/p/5Bj6fT PHONING IT IN: USING CLASSROOM RESPONSE SYSTEMS Kristina De Voe, English & Communications Librarian Paley Library Hashtags: #TempleTTS #CRS
    2. 2. 2 Image by Rob Swatski. Available at https://flic.kr/p/cK7qFw  CLASSROOM RESPONSE SYSTEMS  POLL EVERYWHERE  TYPES OF QUESTIONS  IMPLEMENTATION BEST PRACTICES
    3. 3. Image by Tadeeej. Available at https://flic.kr/p/5Vj5Nf LOOK FAMILIAR?
    4. 4. Image by allegraxoheart. Available at https://flic.kr/p/9fZJky HOW ABOUT THIS?
    5. 5. Image by Earthworm. Available at https://flic.kr/p/fjVHCX
    6. 6. WHY CLASSROOM RESPONSE SYSTEMS ? Image by Scott McLeod. Available at https://flic.kr/p/bTQwfx
    7. 7. ALLOW STUDENTS TO ANSWER MULTIPLE CHOICE OR FREE RESPONSE QUESTIONS Image by Oliver Tacke Available at https://flic.kr/p/jBXjsF Image available at http://bit.ly/JG5f3W
    8. 8. ENABLE STUDENTS TO RESPOND ANONYMOUSLY Image by Adam Bronkhorst. Available at http://bit.ly/1lWd1o0
    9. 9. INIVITE STUDENTS TO THINK INDIVIDUALLY Image by Jorund Myhre. Available at https://flic.kr/p/6iy46e
    10. 10. TEST STUDENTS’ RETENTION OF CONCEPTS Image by cohdra. Available at http://mrg.bz/966s7I
    11. 11. DISPLAY RESULTS IMMEDIATELY Image by Klas-Goran Photo. Available at https://flic.kr/p/gouj3k
    12. 12. WEB BASED FREE FOR INSTRUCTORS & STUDENTS (first 40 responses) CREATES MULTIPLE CHOICE & FREE- TEXT POLLS INTEGRATES EASILY WITH OTHER INSTRUCTIONAL TOOLS UTILIZES TECH STUDENTS ALREADY HAVE ENABLES STUDENTS TO HAVE A MORE REFLECTIVE VOICE IN CLASSROOM
    13. 13.  PRI CING  RE LI ABILITY  E XPE RI ENCE  WAY S TO RE SPON D  POLL FUN CTI ON ALITY  MULTI PLE  FRE E -TE XT  VI SUALS  SUPPORT
    14. 14. Image by @Doug88888. Available at https://flic.kr/p/5uZ6s8 LIMITATIONS
    15. 15. TYPES OF QUESTIONS Image by missyredboots. Available at http://mrg.bz/L5i2uh
    16. 16. CONTENT QUESTIONS D I R E C T L Y A S S E S S S T U D E N T L E A R N I N G PROCESS QUESTIONS G A T H E R I N F O F R O M S T U D E N T S O N H O W T H E Y I N T E R A C T WI T H E A C H O T H E R A N D C O U R S E M A T E R I A L
    17. 17. CONTENT QUESTIONS RECALL QUESTIONS APPLICATION QUESTIONS CRITICAL THINKING QUESTIONS FREE RESPONSE QUESTIONS CONCEPTUAL UNDERSTANDING QUESTIONS
    18. 18. RECALL Image by dave. Available at http://mrg.bz/f0ENQW
    19. 19.  WHERE IN THE LIBRARY DO YOU GO TO CHECK-OUT BOOKS?  HOW LONG CAN YOU CHECK OUT A DVD?  WHAT IS THE URL FOR THE LIBRARY CATALOG? EXAMPLES
    20. 20. CONCEPTUAL UNDERSTANDING
    21. 21.  WHAT IS THE JOURNAL TITLE IN THIS CITATION? Buchman, Dana. “A Special Education.” Good Housekeeping Mar. 2006: 143-48. Print. • A Special Education • Good Housekeeping • Print  WHICH OF THE FOLLOWING STATEMENTS BEST EXPLAINS AN ABSTRACT? • An abstract is a summary of an article • An abstract is bibliographic information (author, title, journal title, etc.) • An abstract is a quote from an article EXAMPLES
    22. 22. APPLICATION Image by nesquivel. Available at http://mrg.bz/ZuuvhN
    23. 23. EXAMPLES  HOW MUCH ADVANCE TIME DID YOU GIVE YOURSELF TO RESEARCH FOR YOUR LAST PAPER? • TWO WEEKS • ONE WEEK • 2-3 DAYS • I STARTED THE NIGHT BEFORE THE PAPER WAS DUE followed by  PREDICT HOW MUCH TIME YOU THINK YOUR CLASSMATES GAVE THEMSELVES.
    24. 24. CRITICAL THINKING Image available at http://www.leftcoastrebel.com/
    25. 25. EXAMPLES  WHICH DO YOU THINK IS THE BEST COMBINATION OF KEYWORDS TO SEARCH FOR INFORMATION ABOUT THE EFFECTS OF THE MEDIA ON TEENAGERS’ PERCEPTIONS OF BODY IMAGE? • body image and media • teenagers and body image and television • teenagers and body image and media • (teens or teenagers) and body image and media
    26. 26. FREE RESPONSE Image by John. Available at https://flic.kr/p/e4nryS
    27. 27. EXAMPLES  WHEN IT COMES TO PUBLIC OPINION POLLS, WHAT MAKES YOU TRUST NUMERIC DATA?  GIVE A SITUATION WHEN YOU WOULD CHOOSE TO QUOTE A SOURCE VERSUS PARAPHRASE A SOURCE.
    28. 28. CONTENT QUESTIONS RECALL QUESTIONS APPLICATION QUESTIONS CRITICAL THINKING QUESTIONS FREE RESPONSE QUESTIONS CONCEPTUAL UNDERSTANDING QUESTIONS
    29. 29. PROCESS QUESTIONS STUDENT PERSPECTIVE QUESTIONS CONFIDENCE LEVEL QUESTIONS MONITORING QUESTIONS CLASSROOM EXPERIMENT QUESTIONS
    30. 30. BEST PRACTICES Image by R. E. ~. Available at http://bit.ly/1oBF1ik
    31. 31. BEST PRACTICES  EXPLAIN TO STUDENTS WHY YOU’RE USING CRS  ALIGN QUESTION TO LEARNING OUTCOMES – DON’T USE TECH FOR THE SAKE OF TECH  CONSIDER NUMBER AND TYPES OF QUESTIONS USED  3-4 questions per 50min session, spaced 10-20mins
    32. 32. BEST PRACTICES  KEEP WORDING OF QUESTIONS SIMPLE  BUILD IN TIME FOR DISCUSSION AND DEBRIEFING DURING AND FOLLOWING EACH QUESTION • think-pair-share • re-polling  COLLECT AND ANALYZE DATA FOR FUTURE REVISIONS
    33. 33. Image by Rob Swatski. Available at https://flic.kr/p/cvsHxy
    34. 34. Image by ramyo. Available at https://flic.kr/p/5Bj6fT QUESTIONS? THANK YOU! Slidedeck available at: slideshare.net/kmdevoe
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