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Status Matters: NCCU Women Empowered Against HIV
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Status Matters: NCCU Women Empowered Against HIV

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NCCU\'s excerpt of the panel, Bringing HIV Prevention Programs to College-Age Minority Students: The Minority-Serving …

NCCU\'s excerpt of the panel, Bringing HIV Prevention Programs to College-Age Minority Students: The Minority-Serving
Institutions HIV Prevention Sustainability Demonstration, presented at the 2011 National HIV Prevention Conference.

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  • North Carolina Central University is in Durham, in the eastern part of North Carolina's Piedmont region. Durham is part of North Carolina's celebrated Research Triangle. Much of Research Triangle Park lies within Durham County.The City of Durham, located at 36 degrees North latitude and at 78 degrees 55 minutes West longitude, has a population of about 229,000 (2009 estimate). Durham is on two Interstate highways, I-40 and I-85, and is served by Raleigh-Durham International Airport. Durham is also home to Duke University.A wide variety of cultural and educational resources are accessible to NCCU students. Musical organizations and activities in the area include blues, jazz, and gospel festivals, community bands, symphony orchestras and choral societies. Museums dedicated to art, the sciences, history and other topics are in the region, as are theaters performing both classical and contemporary drama.Durham is the primary beneficiary of North Carolina Central University's innovative Community Services Program, which insures that NCCU students have experience with voluntary public service. NCCU students serve as tutors in local schools, help build Habitat for Humanity housing, assist with a variety of youth programs, promote the causes of nonprofit service agencies, and volunteer in a variety of other endeavors as they meet the university's standard of 15 hours of community service per semester.
  • Slide 2: School Information Demographics of students and communityCampus size and enrollment Type of MSI (HBCU, TCU, HSI) University type (2yr/4yr)Chancellor: Charlie NelmsNCCU’s vision is to be recognized as one of the nation’s leading institutions for academic excellence in a diverse cultural and education environment. NCCU's Six Core Values:Excellence in teaching, research, scholarship and creativityAccess to education and effective development opportunitiesPromotion of citizenship, service and social justiceAppreciation of and respect for diverse perspectivesSuperb customer serviceCommitment to life-long learningStudent Enrollment:Number of Students: 8,645Undergraduates: 6,520Graduate/Professional: 2,125Percent Minority: 78% African-American, 12% White, 1.8% Hispanic; 1.2% AsianInternational Students: 0.007 %Study Abroad: Fall 2010: 20Campus-housed Undergraduates: 32.7%Student/Faculty Ratio: 15:1Average Class Size: 23Number of Buildings: 64Number of Registered Student Organizations: 135Number of Honor Societies: 7Athletic Conference: MEAC Division I: There are 310 student-athletes who compete in 14 NCAA Division I sports in the MEAC.Tuition and Fees (per semester):Undergraduate In-State: $7,394.78Undergraduate Out of State: $12,681.28Graduate In-State: $7,866.26Graduate Out of State: $13,357.26Professional In-State: $9,735.32Professional Out of State: $16,365.82 Employees:Full-time: 1,361Part-time: 498AccreditationNCCU is accredited by the Commission on Colleges of the Southern Association of Colleges and Schools to award baccalaureate, master's, education specialist, and doctoral degrees.  Contact the Commission on Colleges at 1866 Southern Lane, Decatur, GA 30033-4097 or call (404) 679-4500 for questions about the accreditation of NCCU.Service ProjectsNCCU was the first UNC system campus to require community service for graduation, and we have gained national recognition from the Carnegie Foundation as a community-engaged university.
  • Slide 3: Interest in this ProjectDescribe reasons why you were moved to apply for this grant (for example)Lack of resources on campus?Expand existing services?Local health issue?Personal interest?Particular issue/situation on campus
  • Slides 4-9: MSI Demonstration ProgramDescribe your program activitiesWhat are some of your current program activities?What are the unique issues that are particularly relevant to a HBCU; HSI; TCUWhat is important in making your program relevant to the specific environment and culture at your schoolDiscuss issues related to expanding testing on your campusWhat (overall) barriers have you come across and what barriers do you anticipate?How have you overcome barriers?Describe unexpected alliances or successes
  • Slides 4-9: MSI Demonstration ProgramDescribe your program activitiesWhat are some of your current program activities?What are the unique issues that are particularly relevant to a HBCU; HSI; TCUWhat is important in making your program relevant to the specific environment and culture at your schoolDiscuss issues related to expanding testing on your campusWhat (overall) barriers have you come across and what barriers do you anticipate?How have you overcome barriers?Describe unexpected alliances or successesNCCU & Community ResourcesNCCU Student Health & Counseling ServicesProject SAFENCCU Women’s CenterDurham County Health DepartmentHealing with CAARE, Inc.Department of Public Health Education
  • African American women, including young women 18-24 years of age, are at a persistent high risk for HIV infection and other sexually transmitted diseases. African American women suffer a disproportionate rate of HIV infection and AIDS. They accounted for 66% of HIV/AIDS diagnosis in 2005 while white females accounted for 17%. Yet, African American women constituted 13% of the United State female population and whites constituted 66% of the female population. This presentation will provide an overview of factors that put African American female college students at risk for HIV infection. Secondly, the presentation will describe a project that was designed to prevent the transmission of HIV among female students 18-24 years of age at a Historically Black University using SISTA HIV Intervention. SISTA is a peer-led, skill-building intervention to prevent HIV infection among African-American women. SISTA is guided by two theories: social cognitive theory and theory of gender and power. The intervention consists of five weekly two-hour sessions that cover the following topics: Ethnic/Gender Pride, HIV/AIDS Education, Assertiveness Skills Training, Behavioral Self-Management, and Coping Skills. Research findings reported an increase in consistent condom use, greater sexual self-control, greater sexual assertiveness, and reported an increase in partner norms supportive of safer sex. Social marketing campaigns have been developed for college students to highlight health issues including: safe sex practices (primarily condom use), smoking cessation, alcohol use, healthy eating, and physical activity. However, there are only few federally funded programs that focus on social marketing campaign development as an HIV prevention strategy for African-American college students. The United Nations Programme on HIV/AIDS (UNAIDS) supports the implementation of social marketing programs to limit the spread of HIV/AIDS, citing them as “an effective and cost efficient tool” (UNAIDS, 1998, p. 3). Furthermore, health services researchers have emphasized the need for more well-planned HIV marketing interventions to reach high-risk populations (Thomas and Bartelli, 2001). Finally, President Obama’s National HIV/HIDS Strategy for the United States (2010) acknowledges that approximately 21% of people with HIV in the U.S. still do not know their status. Moreover, this national strategy highlights studies which indicate that people who do not know their HIV status are more likely to engage in HIV transmission-related risk behaviors.  The objective of the social marketing campaign for “Status Matters” is to empower African-American female college students to go beyond encouraging testing. Thus, empowering them to know their HIV status and take the necessary protective steps to either remain negative or for positive participants to get treatment. Therefore, it is a critical component for the effectiveness and sustainability of this multi-component HIV intervention.  There are four phases to the development of the “Status Matters” social marketing campaign, driven by student feedback: planning and strategy development, developing and pretesting materials/messages, implementing the program, and evaluating effectiveness. Using a non-probability, criterion sampling technique, an initial focus group session was conducted using a semi-structured protocol consisting of ten open-ended questions. The purpose of this focus group with African-American female HBCU students was to determine the key messages, strategies, and best channels for the “Status Matters” campaign. Assessment questions were informed by constructs of the Theory of Reasoned Action, the Transtheoretical Model, and the Health Belief Model. The session was digitally recorded and transcribed for data analysis. Data were analyzed by three researchers to determine the common themes for key messages, strategies, and best channels for this population and HBCU environment. The results of this initial stage of social marketing campaign development will inform the development of tailored messages and the channels that are most likely to reach and empower this unique population.
  • Slide 10: Lessons Learned (so far)How has your program evolved from October 2010?What changes do you anticipate making in response to your progress thus farWhat advice would you give another MSI starting up a similar program?
  • Slide 10: Lessons Learned (so far)How has your program evolved from October 2010?What changes do you anticipate making in response to your progress thus farWhat advice would you give another MSI starting up a similar program?
  • Slide 10: Lessons Learned (so far)How has your program evolved from October 2010?What changes do you anticipate making in response to your progress thus farWhat advice would you give another MSI starting up a similar program?

Transcript

  • 1. Status Matters: NCCU Women Empowered Against HIV
    Kimberly M. Coleman, PhD, MPH, MCHES
    Assistant Professor,
    Department of Public Health Education
  • 2. Project Staff
    Deborah A. Fortune, PhD, MCHES, FAAHE
    PI/Project Director
    Kimberly M. Coleman, PhD, MPH, MCHES
    Co-PI/Project Manager
    Seronda Robinson, PhD
    Epidemiologist & Biostatistician
    Tanya M. Bass, MS, CHES
    Certified SISTA Trainer & Health
    Educator
    Student Assistants: Shaneese N. Little (NCCU), Stephanie White (NCCU), Nickie Jackson, BSPH (UNC-CH)
  • 3. About Durham, NC
  • 4. About NCCU
    North Carolina Central University (NCCU) located in Durham, NC
    Comprehensive HBCU
    100 years old
    Approximately 8,500 students
    Over 60% women
    High percentage of low-wealth students from rural areas of North Carolina
  • 5. A Tale of Two Professors
  • 6. Meeting the Need…
    This is what we know…
    Dramatic increase of HIV infection among young African-American women in southern rural areas.
    High risk sexual behaviors among African-American female college students.
    Need for programs focusing on African-American female college students.
    This is our hope for the future…
    Empowered & confident young women
    Significant reduction in risky sexual behaviors
  • 7. What is “Status Matters”?
    A multi-component project is to prevent the transmission of HIV among African-American female college students 18-24 years of age at NCCU.
    Project components:
    Adaptation of the SISTA curriculum taught by peer educators
    Tailored social marketing campaign to impact HIV testing and preventative behaviors
  • 8. Project Goals
    To develop a cadre of African-American female peer educators to implement SISTA curriculum in order to prevent HIV infection among priority population.
    To prevent/reduce risky behaviors associated with HIV infection among priority population.
    To develop and implement a tailored social marketing campaign designed to increase the number who know their HIV status.
  • 9. Follow the Logic Model
  • 10. Lessons…
    How has Status Matters evolved since October 2010?
    Timeline changes
    Initial objectives have been modified
    Perceived communication channels were not necessarily preferred by priority population
    SISTA curriculum adaptation must include focus on HIV testing and knowing one’s status
  • 11. Lessons…
    What changes have/are we making in response to our progress?
    Revised the timeline for each component
    Project objectives are more realistic based on college students’ calendar
    Working with NMAC to develop the campaign using the students’ feedback
    Adapting SISTA curriculum to include addressing the Status Matters goals
  • 12. Lessons…
    Advice to another MSI starting up a similar program?
    Be realistic
    Be patient
    Be flexible
    Be able to communicate the WIIFM
    Project staff
    Participants
    MSI Administration
    Partner organizations
  • 13. Status Matters: NCCU Women Empowered Against HIV
    1801 Fayetteville St.
    P.O. Box 14365
    Durham, NC 27707
    statusmatters@nccu.edu
    919-530-XXXX