New Tools, New Visions 2

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  • Funded by the W.K. Kellogg Foundation, “New Tools, New Visions 2” project brings together the resources of select faculty from the Jiann-Ping Hsu College of Public Health and the College of Health and Human Sciences at Georgia Southern University and four rural Georgia communities surrounding Historically Black Colleges and Universities (HBCUs) to develop a community-based participatory research (CBPR) infrastructure to address issues of environmental health, violence, health equity, and social justice.
  • Albany, GA Tools for Change, Inc.Paine College (Augusta)Visions for the Valley, Inc. (Ft. Valley)Harambee House, Inc. & Citizens for Environmental Justice (Savannah)
  • The ultimate purposes of the technical assistance coordinator (TAC) contracted to work with the NTNV2 grantees are to serve as a liaison between the four grantee organizations and the W. K. Kellogg Foundation (WKKF) project director, Terri D. Wright, MPH, and to provide educational and service-related coordination assistance to all grantee organizations. The primary roles and responsibilities of this position are related to the following:  Community-Based Participatory Research (CBPR) – The TAC will provide targeted trainings related to the philosophy and strategies of CPBR, which empower the NTNV2 grantees to engage in this collaborative methodology throughout and beyond the life of this project. Coordination Assistance – The TAC will support and aid in linking the NTNV2 grantee organizations as they reach out to members and organizations within their local communities, between the other grantees, and with other resources as necessary. For required services and community capacity-building trainings outside of the TAC’s expertise, assistance will be provided to locate, organize, and schedule consultants to work with the grantees. Project Liaison – The TAC will serve as a stable point of contact between the W. K. Kellogg Foundation program director, Terri D. Wright, MPH, and the four NTNV2 grantees. Specific duties will include monthly progress calls with a point of contact from each grantee organization, scheduled grantee site visits (every other month), and monthly status calls with Ms. Wright. Monthly grantee progress calls: The TAC will follow-up with a grantee organization point of contact to ascertain the current progress toward their targeted objectives, answer any questions (or locate the answers, if not known) related to their goals and objectives, relay requests to the WKKF as necessary. Scheduled grantee site visits: The TAC will make an average of 6 annual site visits to each grantee to provide personal contacts with the grantee organizations in an effort to provide capacity-building trainings, as appropriate, determine additional needs to advance the likelihood of successful outcomes, visually document the progress made by grantees and achieved in their communities, and other grant-related observations identified by the WKKF. Monthly WKKF status calls: The TAC will follow-up with the WKKF program director to update her on the current progress and status of grantees toward their targeted objectives, attain answers to grantee questions, share requests for technical assistance outside the TAC’s scope of expertise, and discuss other needs and/or concerns related to the grantee projects. Grantee Meeting Facilitation – The TAC will assist with group meeting facilitation capacity building by providing some modeling activities personally, arranging facilitation skills training for grantee organization members, and/or bringing in a trained facilitator to assist with productive meeting sessions. NTNV2 Grantee Grant Writing Workshop – Based on review of the initial NTNV grantee proposals, a need for a grant writing workshop has been identified by the WKKF program director as part of the capacity-building goals. Therefore, the TAC will assist in the planning and coordination of this workshop for the grantee organizations. NTNV2 Evaluation Team Collaboration – Because formative and summative evaluations are part of the NTNV2 project, there will be some collaboration between the NTNV2 Evaluation Team to assess (and possibly develop additional) evaluation questions related to the application of CBPR principles and community capacity building among the grantees and to support cross-site learning.
  • The ultimate purposes of the technical assistance coordinator (TAC) contracted to work with the NTNV2 grantees are to serve as a liaison between the four grantee organizations and the W. K. Kellogg Foundation (WKKF) project director, Terri D. Wright, MPH, and to provide educational and service-related coordination assistance to all grantee organizations. The primary roles and responsibilities of this position are related to the following:  Community-Based Participatory Research (CBPR) – The TAC will provide targeted trainings related to the philosophy and strategies of CPBR, which empower the NTNV2 grantees to engage in this collaborative methodology throughout and beyond the life of this project. Coordination Assistance – The TAC will support and aid in linking the NTNV2 grantee organizations as they reach out to members and organizations within their local communities, between the other grantees, and with other resources as necessary. For required services and community capacity-building trainings outside of the TAC’s expertise, assistance will be provided to locate, organize, and schedule consultants to work with the grantees. Project Liaison – The TAC will serve as a stable point of contact between the W. K. Kellogg Foundation program director, Terri D. Wright, MPH, and the four NTNV2 grantees. Specific duties will include monthly progress calls with a point of contact from each grantee organization, scheduled grantee site visits (every other month), and monthly status calls with Ms. Wright. Monthly grantee progress calls: The TAC will follow-up with a grantee organization point of contact to ascertain the current progress toward their targeted objectives, answer any questions (or locate the answers, if not known) related to their goals and objectives, relay requests to the WKKF as necessary. Scheduled grantee site visits: The TAC will make an average of 6 annual site visits to each grantee to provide personal contacts with the grantee organizations in an effort to provide capacity-building trainings, as appropriate, determine additional needs to advance the likelihood of successful outcomes, visually document the progress made by grantees and achieved in their communities, and other grant-related observations identified by the WKKF. Monthly WKKF status calls: The TAC will follow-up with the WKKF program director to update her on the current progress and status of grantees toward their targeted objectives, attain answers to grantee questions, share requests for technical assistance outside the TAC’s scope of expertise, and discuss other needs and/or concerns related to the grantee projects. Grantee Meeting Facilitation – The TAC will assist with group meeting facilitation capacity building by providing some modeling activities personally, arranging facilitation skills training for grantee organization members, and/or bringing in a trained facilitator to assist with productive meeting sessions. NTNV2 Grantee Grant Writing Workshop – Based on review of the initial NTNV grantee proposals, a need for a grant writing workshop has been identified by the WKKF program director as part of the capacity-building goals. Therefore, the TAC will assist in the planning and coordination of this workshop for the grantee organizations. NTNV2 Evaluation Team Collaboration – Because formative and summative evaluations are part of the NTNV2 project, there will be some collaboration between the NTNV2 Evaluation Team to assess (and possibly develop additional) evaluation questions related to the application of CBPR principles and community capacity building among the grantees and to support cross-site learning.
  • New Tools, New Visions 2

    1. 1. New Tools, New Visions 2 : Lessons learned as a CBPR technical assistance coordinator partnered with four rural, African-American communities<br />Kimberly M. Coleman, PhD, MPH, CHES; <br />Danielle Blackwell, BA; Adeleri Onisegun, MA, PhD<br />Zenobia Hodges, BSW; Johnnie Zanders, BSW, &<br />Mildred McClain, PhD<br />138th Annual Meeting of the American Public Health Association<br />Denver, CO November 8, 2010<br />
    2. 2. Presenter Disclosure<br />Kimberly M. Coleman<br />The following personal financial relationships with commercial interests relevant to this presentation existed during the past 12 months:<br />Consultant and Paid Contractor, W. K. Kellogg Foundation<br />
    3. 3. The Purpose of New Tools, New Visions 2<br />To connect four rural GA communities surrounding Historically Black Colleges and Universities (HBCUs) with faculty resources at Georgia Southern University to develop a community-based participatory research (CBPR) infrastructure to address issues of environmental health, violence, health equity, and social justice<br />
    4. 4. Project Goals<br />To develop the capacity of community residents to resolve identified problems and create change in public policy and quality of life using several public health-based strategies.<br />To engage community residents and partners with researchers and/or HBCUs to develop solutions for each targeted community’s health issue among local residents.<br />
    5. 5. Community Grantees<br />Four Southern Georgia community organizations were selected after submitting proposals to the W. K. Kellogg Foundation.<br />Harambee House, Inc. & Citizens for Environmental Justice <br />
    6. 6.
    7. 7. Purpose of the TAC<br />Served as a liaison between the four grantee organizations and the WKKF project manager and provided educational and service-related coordination assistance. <br />Community-Based Participatory Research Trainings<br />Network Coordination Assistance<br />Project Liaison (via monthly progress calls & scheduled site visits)<br />
    8. 8. Purpose of the TAC (con’t)<br />Grantee Meeting Facilitation <br />NTNV2 Grantee Grant Writing Workshop<br /> NTNV2 Evaluation Team Collaboration<br />
    9. 9. NTNV2 Organizational Structure<br />How did this structure<br />impact the project?<br />
    10. 10. Strengths<br />Weaknesses<br />Grantees’ regular communication with funder via TAC<br />TAC and Evaluation Team’s opportunity for dialogue.<br />Network development and enhancement among grantees.<br />No “lead” evaluator – only primary & secondary for each site.<br />Grantees’ limited communication with Evaluation Team.<br />Hierarchical design may not have been best model for project management.<br />
    11. 11. Lessons Learned<br />Role Delineation<br />Planning, Implementation, Evaluation<br />Communication<br />Power/Control<br />Cultural Humility<br />
    12. 12. Role Delineation<br />Clear roles, operating guidelines, and should be defined and agreed upon among support resources FIRST.<br />Understand the organization or community structure and diagram it for all to see.<br />Work with organization or community to delineate the roles and responsibilities of each.<br />
    13. 13. Planning, Implementation, & Evaluation<br />Conduct formal and informal needs assessments with the community.<br />If TAC relationship relies on a strong rapport with the community, it will be necessary to be involved as an integral part of collaborative evaluation and vice-versa.<br />There is valuable qualitative data there… ethnographic research.<br />TAC must agree to adhere to organization’s/ community’s guiding principles and operating guidelines.<br />
    14. 14. Communication<br />Dialogue is REQUIRED<br />Willingness to truly “listen” (No “already always listening”)<br />Applies to everyone.<br />
    15. 15. Power/Control<br />Disagreement is a normal part of the process.<br />However, inflexibility is likely to derail progress .<br />Conflict resolution takes skill and courage.<br />Sometimes, you have to call “foolishness” and internal destruction out for the cohesiveness of the organization/ community.<br />Often, more control issues were observed among the academics than the community members.<br />WIIFM?<br />
    16. 16. Cultural Humility<br />“In a democratic chronology, it’s important to have patience to get to know people, to be open, to create bonds of trust.” – Dr. Cornell West (Twitter® via HootSuite, 9/23/2010)<br />Support community programs and interventions, when possible.<br />Be authentic… <br />
    17. 17. Community-Campus Communication<br />
    18. 18. Is a TAC needed when conducting CBPR in the Black community?<br />Yes. The degree of support will be directed by community 95% of time.<br />Pledge to practice collaboration, accepting community members as research partners, a desire for advocacy, a professional commitment to social justice, and acceptance of power sharing in decision making throughout the research process.<br />
    19. 19. Qualifications of a CBPR-TAC<br />Training in AND experience in:<br />Community organizing<br />CBPR<br />Conflict resolution<br />Research ethics<br />Good communication AND listening skills<br />Congenial<br />Authentic<br />Management experience<br />Event planning capability<br />Flexibility<br />
    20. 20. Final Thoughts…<br /> “Once social change begins it can not be reversed. You can not un-educate the person that has learned to read. You can not humiliate the person who feels pride. You can not oppress the people who are not afraid anymore.”<br />Cesar Chavez<br />
    21. 21. Acknowledgements<br />Albany, GA Tools for Change, Inc.<br />Karen McWhite, JD – Steering Committee President<br />Danielle Blackwell, BA – Community Coordinator<br />Ellis Harris, MSA – AGTFC, Inc. Board President<br />Visions for the Valley, Inc.<br />Johnnie Zanders, BSW & Zenobia Hodges, BSW – Project Coordinators<br />Bishop John Moss – Visions for the Valley, Inc. President<br />
    22. 22. Acknowledgements<br />Paine College<br />Rev. Terrance Dicks – Steering Committee Chair<br />Adeleri Onisegun, PhD – Project Coordinator/Associate Professor, Paine College<br />George C. Bradley, PhD – President, Paine College<br />Harambee House, Inc. & Citizens for Environmental Justice <br />Lynn Pinder & Anees Fardan – Project Coordinators<br />Mildred McClain, PhD – Executive Director<br />Terri D. Wright, MPH – WKKF Project Manager (fmr.)<br />
    23. 23. Contact Information<br />Kimberly M. Coleman, PhD, MPH, CHES<br />North Carolina Central University<br />Department of Public Health Education<br />1701 Fayetteville Street, Box 19738<br />Durham, NC 27707<br />919.530.7131<br />kcolem16@nccu.edu or drkmcoleman@gmail.com<br />

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