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  • Francesco and the Italian Sonnet http://www.quia.com/quiz/754590.htmlQuizlethttp://quizlet.com/2133422/sonnet-quiz-flash-cards/Brainglehttp://www.braingle.com/trivia/22695/sonnets.html
  • http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=cRgcUlZZmxohttp://viewpure.com/cRgcUlZZmxo
  • http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ZK86GOGNsschttp://viewpure.com/ZK86GOGNssc
  • Ababcdcdefefgg
  • Lines are in an octave (eight lines) and a sestet (six lines).
  • Rhyme scheme is abbaabbacdcdcd.
  • The turn in this sonnet is between the octave and the sestet, or after eight lines.The period at the end of line eight is a clue that this is the turn, especially because it is one of only two periods in the sonnet.Before the turn, the speaker is telling of groups of fourteen; after the turn, he tells of who wrote the sonnets

Love sonnets week 1 ss lms Love sonnets week 1 ss lms Presentation Transcript

  • LOVE SONNETS British & World Literature Unit 2, Session 1 October 4, 2012 Working to provide an exemplary individualizedand engaging educational experience for all students.
  • •Note I suggest you listen to the recording of the session for full details
  • Warm-up• Francesco Petrarch and the Italian Sonnet• Sonnet Quiz Flashcards• Braingle: Sonnets Quiz
  • Common Core Georgia Performance Standards• ELACC9-10RL2: Determine a theme or central idea of text and analyze in detail its development over the course of the text, including how it emerges and is shaped and refined by specific details; provide an objective summary of the text.• ELACC11-12RL5: Analyze how an author’s choices concerning how to structure specific parts of a text (e.g., the choice of where to begin or end a story, the choice to provide a comedic or tragic resolution) contribute to its overall structure and meaning as well as its aesthetic impact.• ELACC11-12SL1: Initiate and participate effectively in a range of collaborative discussions(one-on-one, in groups, and teacher-led) with diverse partners on grades 11-12 topics, texts, and issues, building on others’ ideas and expressing their own clearly and persuasively.
  • Keywords to know  OctaveCouplet  PersonificationDiction  QuatrainEpic  Renaissance  RhymeFigurative language  Rhyme schemeHumanism  RhythmImagery  SestetMetaphor  Simile  SpeakerMeter  StyleNarrative poem  tone
  • •couplet : two consecutive lines of poetry•diction : the choice of words used by a speaker or writer•epic : a long narrative poem that celebrates the deeds of a heroic figure•figurative language : language that uses figures of speech such as metaphor, simile, and personification for poetic effect rather than for precise, factual meaning; for example, "Her eyes are like stars" is figurative language, in contrast to the literal use of "stars" in "The stars are shining tonight"
  •  humanism :a movement during the Renaissance that emphasized secular ideas and concerns, based on classical studies imagery : language that creates a mental picture by appealing to the senses, that makes readers see, hear, smell, taste, or feel things in their imagination; for example, "the coal-black night," "the stinging cold," "the rapping and tapping of rain on the roof" metaphor : a figure of speech that suggests or states a comparison between two unlike things, without using such words as like or as; for example, "The cat s eyes were emeralds shining in the night." meter : the arrangement of words in poetry based on rhythm, accents, and the number of syllables in a line
  •  narrative poem : a poem that tells a story octave : a stanza of eight lines in a poem personification : giving human qualities to a thing or abstraction; for example, "The kettle sang on the hearth," or "After the victory, freedom held its head high in the nation." quatrain : a stanza of four lines in a poem Renaissance : a general time period stretching from roughly the fourteenth century to as late as the seventeenth century when the arts and intellectual activity flourished in Europe
  •  rhyme : words with similar ending sounds such as hit/bit, yellow/fellow, bark/park, and so on; when words at the end of a line of poetry or verse sound the same, the lines are said to rhyme rhyme scheme : the pattern of rhymes made by the final words or sounds in the lines of a poem, typically designated by a different letter of the alphabet to represent each rhyme  Roses are red a  Violets are blue b  Sugar is sweet c  So are you b
  •  rhythm : a regular pattern of sound and beats within a poem sestet : a stanza of six lines in a poem simile : a figure of speech that compares two things, usually using the words like or as; for example, "like a thief in the night," "quiet as a mouse" speaker : the imaginary person who speaks the words of a poem, not necessarily the poet style : the words the writer chooses and the way the writer arranges the words into sentences tone : the attitude of the writer toward the topic or
  • Poet vs. Speaker • As with the study of any poem, you make a distinction between the poet and the speaker when reading and analyzing sonnets. • The poet is the writer of the work; Petrarch and Shakespeare are the poets • The speaker is the narrator of the poem. That is, just as a prose author may write a novel told from the point of view of a fictional narrator, poets may write verse from the point of view of a fictional speaker.
  • How to Read a Poem
  • Strategies for Understanding Poetry1. Organization Read lines according toPunctuation & organization & punctuation2. Paraphrase Put it in your own words Organization3. Figurative language Interpret figurative language4. Sensory image Use your senses
  • 1. Read according to punctuation• Punctuation in poems indicates when to pause or stop reading. •Keep reading when there is no punctuation at the end of a line •Pause at commas, dashes, colons, semi- colons (, - : ;) •Stop at end marks (. ! ?)
  • Parts of a Poem1. Stanza Like a paragraph2. Line Like a sentence Like a word3. Foot Like a syllable• 4. Meter
  • Parts of a poem1. Stanza: a division or section of a poem 1. They are named for the quantity of lines it contains.  couplet = two lines quatrain = four lines2. Line: basic unit of poetic form3. Foot: A basic unit of rhythm within a line, with one stressed and one unstressed syllable in it4. Meter: the rhythm or repeating pattern in poetry 1. window (win stressed dow unstressed)  casino (ca unstressed si stressed no unstressed
  • Iambic Pentameter•A line of Iambic Pentameter is a line with ten beats.•An “Iamb” is two beats, or one “foot.”•“Penta” is five (line has five “feet”).•“Meter” is the rhythm of the poem.•A “foot” is made of an unstressed syllable and a stressed syllable (in that order).
  • 2. Paraphrase•Putting the poem in your own words to make sure you understand it.
  • 3. Interpret figurative language• Figurative language is language that is not intended to be taken word for word. It sets up comparisons that help readers see things in new ways or form a vivid mental picture of something• She is as happy as a clam• It’s raining cats and dogs• It is a million miles away
  • 4. Use your senses•Being descriptive by using your senses (sight, hearing, smell, touch, or taste) to help paint a picture
  • Sensory Image•Appeals to our 5 senses •Sweet, sour, bitter •Icy, sweltering •Humongous, tiny •Booming
  • WHAT IS A SONNET?Understanding theforms, meter, rhyme, and other aspects ofthe sonnet .
  • SonnetsHistorical Background• The sonnet is a form of poetry that exalts human love and praises the poets or speakers beloved.• The development of the sonnet is closely related to the rise of a philosophy known as humanism. • Humanism: a movement during the Renaissance that emphasized secular ideas and concerns, based on classical studies• Every literary period is a reaction to the ideals of the previous period.• Humanism is a philosophy that inquires into and deeply considers human experiences; and of these experiences, one of the most common is love.• Love poetry during the Renaissance blossomed with the creation of a poetic form that has stood the test of time: the sonnet.• Writing a sonnet is like playing a poetic game that has strict, specific rules, rules established during the Renaissance and followed by poets ever since.
  • The Sonnet• A sonnet is a fourteen-line poem in iambic pentameter with a carefully patterned rhyme scheme. Other strict, short poetic forms occur in English poetry (the sestina, the villanelle, and the haiku, for example), but none has been used so successfully by so many different poets.
  • Petrarchan SonnetsPetrarch, a humanistphilosopher, deeply experienced one ofthe most common of humanexperiences: unrequited love.In his sonnets, he dwells on this love and how it both enriches and challenges him.Humanism holds as a worthy subject all human experience; and Petrarch, a father ofhumanism, makes use of the compact, dense language of the sonnet to grapple withwhat many human hearts endure. (check link)
  • Shakespearean Sonnets The person who is arguably the greatest playwright in history is also one of the greatest poets.Composing sonnets became a fad in England during Shakespeares day; more than 1,200sonnets survive just from the decade beginning in 1590. The sonnet was the perfectcanvas on which the writer could display his wit, his clever use of language, and hisimagination.By the time Shakespeares 154 sonnets were published in 1609, however, the vogue forsonnets had passed. Yet Shakespeares sonnets, in time, were acknowledged asmasterpieces of thoughtful poetry that transcend the playful, courtly sonnets that werein fashion during his time. (show link)
  • Let’s compare the two styles of sonnet… Petrarchan Sonnet Shakespearean SonnetThe Italian form of the sonnet consists of 14 The English sonnet also has 14 lines, but theylines divided into an octave (eight lines) are divided into three quatrains (four linesfollowed by a sestet (six lines). each) and a rhyming couplet (two lines).The turn, or volta, occurs at the beginning of The turn, or volta, comes at the beginning ofthe sestet, in line 9. line 13 – that is, the beginning of the couplet.The octave’s rhyme scheme is almost always Each quatrain consists of two pairs ofthe same. abbaabba Sometimes you may seethe octave rhyme scheme abbacddc or even alternating rhyming lines, and the sonnet(rarely) abababab ends with a rhyming couplet.The sestet’s rhyme scheme can vary but the The rhyme scheme is almost always :A and B rhymes of the octave cannot beused again., abab cdcd efef gg.When written in English, Petrarchan sonnets Shakespearean sonnets are written inare written in iambic pentameter. When iambic pentameter, which means that eachthey are written in Italian, they do not line contains 10 syllables and every secondfollow this meter because it does not lend syllable is stressed.
  • The Sonnet• The form into which a poet puts his or her words is always something of which the reader ought to take conscious note. And when poets have chosen to work within such a strict form, that form and its strictures make up part of what they want to say. In other words, the poet is using the structure of the poem as part of the language act: we will find the "meaning" not only in the words, but partly in their pattern as well.
  • The Sonnet•The sonnet can be thematically divided into two sections:•The first presents the theme, raises an issue or doubt,•The second part answers the question, resolves the problem, or drives home the poems point.•The turn, or change, in the poem helps move forward the emotional action of the poem quickly.
  • The Sonnet•The Italian form, in some ways the simpler of the two, usually …..•projects and develops a subject in the octet,• then executes a turn at the beginning of the sestet•so that the sestet can in some way release the tension built up in the octave.
  • “Farewell Love and all thy laws for ever” Farewell Love and all thy laws for ever, a Thy baited hooks shall tangle me no more; b Senec and Plato call me from thy lore b To perfect wealth my wit for to endeavour. a In blind error when I did persever, a Thy sharp repulse, that pricketh aye so sore, b Hath taught me to set in trifles no store b And scape forth, since liberty is lever. a Therefore farewell; go trouble younger hearts c And in me claim no more authority; d With idle youth go use thy property d And thereon spend thy many brittle darts. c For hitherto though I have lost all my time, e Me lusteth no longer rotten boughs to climb. e - Wyatt Devonshire (1557)
  • The Sonnet•The Shakespearean sonnet has a wider range of possibilities.• One pattern introduces an idea in the first quatrain• complicates it in the second• complicates it still further in the third• resolves the whole thing in the final couplet.
  • “Sonnet 138” or “When My Love Swears thatShe is Made of Truth”When my love swears that she is made of truth a {First quatrain; note the puns andI do believe her, though I know she lies, b the intellectual games: [I know sheThat she might think me some untutord youth, a lies, so I believe her so that she willUnlearned in the worlds false subtleties. b believe me to be young and untutored]}Thus vainly thinking that she thinks me young, c {Second quatrain: [Well of course IAlthough she knows my days are past the best, d know that she doesnt really think ImSimply I credit her false speaking tongue: c young, but I have to pretend to believe her so that she will pretendOn both sides thus is simple truth suppressd. d that Im young]} {Third quatrain: [so why dont weBut wherefore says she not she is unjust? e both fess up? because love dependsAnd wherefore say not I that I am old? f upon trust and upon youth]}O, loves best habit is in seeming trust, e {Final couplet, and resolution:And age in love loves not to have years told: f [we lie to ourselves and to eachTherefore I lie with her and she with me, g other, so that we may flatterAnd in our faults by lies we flatterd be. g ourselves that we are young, honest, - William Shakespeare and in love]. Note especially the puns.
  • The Sonnet: punctuation•Pay close attention to line-end punctuation, especially at lines four, eight, and twelve, and to connective words like and, or, but, as, so, if, then, when, or which at the beginnings of lines (especially lines five, nine, and thirteen).
  • Review: Sonnet Form•Has 14 lines.•Must be written in iambic pentameter•Must follow a specific rhyme scheme, depending on the type of sonnet.•Can be about any subject, though they are often about love or nature.•Introduces a problem or question in the beginning, and a resolution is offered after the turn.
  • Review•The Italian, or Petrarchan sonnet: • Fourteen lines • Iambic pentameter • Consists of an octet (eight lines) of two envelope quatrains •Usually abba abba, •Sometimes abba cddc, •Or rarely abab abab; •The turn occurs at the end of the octet and is developed and closed in the sestet. • And a sestet (six lines) •Which may rhyme xyzxyz •Or xyxyxy
  • Review• The English or Shakespearean sonnet: •Fourteen lines •Iambic pentameter •Consists of three Sicilian quatrains (four lines) •And a heroic couplet (two lines) •Rhymes: abab cdcd efef gg •The turn comes at or near line 13
  • What type of sonnet is “What the Sonnet Is”?•We are going analyze a sonnet to determine what “type” of sonnet it is…..•Ask yourself the following questions•What are the groupings of the lines (how many lines are in each group)?•What is the rhyme scheme?•Where is the turn?•Based on your answers, what kind of sonnet is it?
  • “What the Sonnet is”Fourteen small broidered berries on the hemOf Circe’s mantle, each of magic gold;Fourteen of lone Calypso’s tears that rolledInto the sea, for pearls to come of them;Fourteen clear signs of omen in the gemWith which Medea human fate foretold;Fourteen small drops, which Faustus, growing old,Craved of the Fiend, to water Life’s dry stem.It is the pure white diamond Dante broughtTo Beatrice; the sapphire Laura woreWhen Petrarch cut it sparkling out of thought;The ruby Shakespeare hewed from his heart’s core;The dark, deep emerald that Rossetti wroughtFor his own soul, to wear for evermore.~Eugene Lee-Hamilton
  • •What are the groupings of the lines (how many lines are in each group)?
  • “What the Sonnet is”Fourteen small broidered berries on the hemOf Circe’s mantle, each of magic gold;Fourteen of lone Calypso’s tears that rolledInto the sea, for pearls to come of them;Fourteen clear signs of omen in the gemWith which Medea human fate foretold;Fourteen small drops, which Faustus, growing old,Craved of the Fiend, to water Life’s dry stem.It is the pure white diamond Dante broughtTo Beatrice; the sapphire Laura woreWhen Petrarch cut it sparkling out of thought;The ruby Shakespeare hewed from his heart’s core;The dark, deep emerald that Rossetti wroughtFor his own soul, to wear for evermore.~Eugene Lee-Hamilton
  • What type of sonnet is “What the Sonnet Is”?Fourteen small broidered berries on the hemOf Circe’s mantle, each of magic gold;Fourteen of lone Calypso’s tears that rolledInto the sea, for pearls to come of them;Fourteen clear signs of omen in the gemWith which Medea human fate foretold;Fourteen small drops, which Faustus, growing old,Craved of the Fiend, to water Life’s dry stem.It is the pure white diamond Dante broughtTo Beatrice; the sapphire Laura woreWhen Petrarch cut it sparkling out of thought;The ruby Shakespeare hewed from his heart’s core;The dark, deep emerald that Rossetti wroughtFor his own soul, to wear for evermore.
  • •What is the rhyme scheme?
  • “What the Sonnet is”Fourteen small broidered berries on the hemOf Circe’s mantle, each of magic gold;Fourteen of lone Calypso’s tears that rolledInto the sea, for pearls to come of them;Fourteen clear signs of omen in the gemWith which Medea human fate foretold;Fourteen small drops, which Faustus, growing old,Craved of the Fiend, to water Life’s dry stem.It is the pure white diamond Dante broughtTo Beatrice; the sapphire Laura woreWhen Petrarch cut it sparkling out of thought;The ruby Shakespeare hewed from his heart’s core;The dark, deep emerald that Rossetti wroughtFor his own soul, to wear for evermore.~Eugene Lee-Hamilton
  • What type of sonnet is “What the Sonnet Is”?Fourteen small broidered berries on the hemOf Circe’s mantle, each of magic gold;Fourteen of lone Calypso’s tears that rolledInto the sea, for pearls to come of them;Fourteen clear signs of omen in the gemWith which Medea human fate foretold;Fourteen small drops, which Faustus, growing old,Craved of the Fiend, to water Life’s dry stem.It is the pure white diamond Dante broughtTo Beatrice; the sapphire Laura woreWhen Petrarch cut it sparkling out of thought;The ruby Shakespeare hewed from his heart’s core;The dark, deep emerald that Rossetti wroughtFor his own soul, to wear for evermore.
  • •Where is the turn?
  • “What the Sonnet is”Fourteen small broidered berries on the hemOf Circe’s mantle, each of magic gold;Fourteen of lone Calypso’s tears that rolledInto the sea, for pearls to come of them;Fourteen clear signs of omen in the gemWith which Medea human fate foretold;Fourteen small drops, which Faustus, growing old,Craved of the Fiend, to water Life’s dry stem.It is the pure white diamond Dante broughtTo Beatrice; the sapphire Laura woreWhen Petrarch cut it sparkling out of thought;The ruby Shakespeare hewed from his heart’s core;The dark, deep emerald that Rossetti wroughtFor his own soul, to wear for evermore.~Eugene Lee-Hamilton
  • What type of sonnet is “What the Sonnet Is”?• The turn in this sonnet is between the octave and the sestet, or after eight lines.• The period at the end of line eight is a clue that this is the turn, especially because it is one of only two periods in the sonnet.• Before the turn, the speaker is telling of groups of fourteen; after the turn, he tells of who wrote the sonnets.
  • What type of sonnet is“What the Sonnet Is”?
  • What type of sonnet is “What the Sonnet Is”?“What the Sonnet Is” is anItalian/Petrarchan Sonnet!
  • Organization1. Stanzas are made up of2. Lines are made up of3. Meter are made up of4. Feet