Diagnosing Speech Sound Disorders in Vietnamese speaking children learning English as a second language Kimberly Jones SLP...
Typical Vietnamese Speech Development <ul><li>No Research Available!!! Why??? </li></ul><ul><li>Are there speech disorders...
Speech disorders in Vietnam <ul><li>No incidence/prevalence data could be found </li></ul><ul><li>According to Hwa-Froelic...
Speech Therapy in Vietnam <ul><li>Speech therapy in Vietnam according to Dr. Charlotte Ducote </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Most i...
Speech Therapy in Vietnam: What is Available? <ul><li>J594 Vietnam Speech-Language Program (Trinh Foundation Australia) </...
YES!!! <ul><li>As of the most recent Newsletter from October 2011: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>All 18 students successfully comp...
Vietnamese Population in the U.S. <ul><li>Increasing: From 3.6% in 2000 to 4.8% of the US Population in 2010 </li></ul><ul...
Research on Speech Sound Acquisition for Vietnamese - English speakers <ul><li>No published studies could be located speci...
Vietnamese Phonology <ul><li>Several languages have influenced Vietnamese: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>English, Chinese, Malay, ...
Vietnamese Phonology <ul><li>Syllabic Language: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Three components of a Vietnamese syllable: </li></ul...
Vietnamese Phonology <ul><ul><li>Six Vietnamese Tones  (Agar, 1998-2011) </li></ul></ul><ul><li>The tone used changes the ...
Vietnamese Dialectical Differences <ul><li>Note:  Southern dialect may produce written ‘v’ as /j/, written final ‘t’ as /k...
Vietnamese and English Phonology Contrast/Comparison <ul><li>English </li></ul><ul><li>Vietnamese </li></ul><ul><li>Tone d...
Error’s that may indicate a Speech-Sound DIFFERENCE  (Hwa-Froelich &Westby, 2002) (Hwa-Froelich &Westby, 2002) Vietnamese ...
Diagnosing speech sound disorders in Monolingual Vietnamese Children <ul><li>Tang & Barlow’s 2006 study described the spee...
Diagnosing speech sound disorders in Monolingual Vietnamese Children <ul><li>When compared to typical speech sound develop...
Diagnosing speech sound disorders <ul><li>When evaluating speech sound production of English language learners who’s first...
Cultural do’s and don'ts for working with Vietnamese families  <ul><li>Conversation and Meetings: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Al...
Cultural do’s and don'ts for working with Vietnamese families  <ul><li>Non-Verbal: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>If you use the “o...
References <ul><li>Bowen, C. (2010, March 23).  Speech therapy in viet nam . Retrieved from  http://www.speech-language-th...
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in …5
×

Vietnamese phonologicaldisorders kimberly jones

2,697 views
2,430 views

Published on

0 Comments
3 Likes
Statistics
Notes
  • Be the first to comment

No Downloads
Views
Total views
2,697
On SlideShare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
8
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
0
Comments
0
Likes
3
Embeds 0
No embeds

No notes for slide
  • J594: http://www.speech-language-therapy.com/vietnam.htm
  • http://www.trinhfoundation.org/index_files/Page3390.htm
  • Notice: final consonants are restricted to include only nasals or unvoiced stop sounds
  • http://www.multicsd.org/doku.php?id=vietnam
  • http://www.multicsd.org/doku.php?id=vietnam
  • Vietnamese phonologicaldisorders kimberly jones

    1. 1. Diagnosing Speech Sound Disorders in Vietnamese speaking children learning English as a second language Kimberly Jones SLP6091 Multicultural Issues Nova Southeastern University 10/30/11
    2. 2. Typical Vietnamese Speech Development <ul><li>No Research Available!!! Why??? </li></ul><ul><li>Are there speech disorders in Vietnam? </li></ul>
    3. 3. Speech disorders in Vietnam <ul><li>No incidence/prevalence data could be found </li></ul><ul><li>According to Hwa-Froelich and Westby (2003): </li></ul><ul><li>Speech sound disorders usually were not recognized as a disability as are blindness, deafness, and physical impairments that restrict daily activity </li></ul><ul><li>Cleft Palate, speech and learning problems, and mental retardation were considered to be due to a child’s nature, stubbornness, laziness, or fate </li></ul>
    4. 4. Speech Therapy in Vietnam <ul><li>Speech therapy in Vietnam according to Dr. Charlotte Ducote </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Most interest is from rehabilitation specialists </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>More interest each year for increasing special education in designated schools and/or programs related to orphanages </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Non-Governmental Organizations in Vietnam and some from outside Vietnam are sponsoring activities to raise awareness of how to help people with speech-language and related disorders. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>There were no formal training programs in speech therapy or audiology in Vietnam as of early 2002 and no one had left the country to receive formal training from a college or university program in speech therapy </li></ul></ul>(Bowen, 2010)
    5. 5. Speech Therapy in Vietnam: What is Available? <ul><li>J594 Vietnam Speech-Language Program (Trinh Foundation Australia) </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Working to establish speech-language therapy as a profession using a “train the trainer” model </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Planning and funding the first full time, two year post graduate diploma program in speech-language therapy at the Pham Ngoc Thach Municipal Medical University in Ho Chi Minh City, to begin in September of 2010. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Did it happen??? </li></ul></ul>(Bowen, 2010)
    6. 6. YES!!! <ul><li>As of the most recent Newsletter from October 2011: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>All 18 students successfully completed Year 1 of the Program </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Program Coordinator Ms. Marie Atherton will showcase the program and students at the ASHA Conference in November 2011 in San Diego </li></ul></ul>September 6, 2010 Opening Ceremony for the 1 st ever 2-year Speech-Language Post-graduate Program in Vietnam (Bowen, 2010)
    7. 7. Vietnamese Population in the U.S. <ul><li>Increasing: From 3.6% in 2000 to 4.8% of the US Population in 2010 </li></ul><ul><ul><li>4 th largest Asian group in the United States according to the 2000 Census: </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Chinese: 23.8% of the US Asian Population </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Filipino: 18.3 % of the US Asian Population </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Asian Indian: 16.2% of the US Asian Population </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Vietnamese: 10.9% which equals 1,110,207 people </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>In 2000: Vietnamese had the highest proportion of the Asian US population that reported they spoke English less than “very well”. (62%) </li></ul></ul>(Reeves & Bennett, 2004; Humes, Jones & Ramirez, 2011)
    8. 8. Research on Speech Sound Acquisition for Vietnamese - English speakers <ul><li>No published studies could be located specifically related to typical speech sound development of Vietnamese children who learn English as a second language </li></ul><ul><li>Instead – a detailed description of general Vietnamese phonology (including it’s similarities and differences with English) and data from a qualitative study describing the speech characteristics of highly unintelligible monolingual Vietnamese speakers will be reviewed to provide us with information that may assist in the diagnosis of speech-sound disorders in Vietnamese children who are learning English as a second language. </li></ul>
    9. 9. Vietnamese Phonology <ul><li>Several languages have influenced Vietnamese: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>English, Chinese, Malay, and French </li></ul></ul><ul><li>There are Three main Dialects: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Southern </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Central </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Northern </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Pronunciation and tone varies across dialects but graphemes used in writing are the same </li></ul>(Hwa-Froelich, Hodson & Edwards, 2006)
    10. 10. Vietnamese Phonology <ul><li>Syllabic Language: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Three components of a Vietnamese syllable: </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Initial consonant singleton, the rhyme, and the tone </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Four types of Syllables: </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Open: CV or CvV </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Partially Open: Cv or Vv (ending in a semi-vowel) </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Partially Closd: ending in a nasal </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Closed: ending in a voiceless unreleased plosive Syllable structures beginning in a vowel have also been considered: e.g. VC, Vv, and syllabic V </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>There are no consonant clusters in Vietnamese </li></ul></ul>(Tang & Barlow, 2006)
    11. 11. Vietnamese Phonology <ul><ul><li>Six Vietnamese Tones (Agar, 1998-2011) </li></ul></ul><ul><li>The tone used changes the meaning of the word: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>What does this mean for those with voice impairments? </li></ul></ul>Listen to a recording of connected speech from two speakers: Omniglot.com (Southern and Northern Dialect) Translation All human beings are born free and equal in dignity and rights. They are endowed with reason and conscience and should act towards one another in a spirit of brotherhood. (Article 1 of the Universal Declaration of Human Rights)
    12. 12. Vietnamese Dialectical Differences <ul><li>Note: Southern dialect may produce written ‘v’ as /j/, written final ‘t’ as /k/, and written final ‘n’ as “ng”. </li></ul>Consider: Would these productions appear to indicate speech sound disorder if the clinician was not aware of the phonology of Vietnamese? (Tang & Barlow, 2006)
    13. 13. Vietnamese and English Phonology Contrast/Comparison <ul><li>English </li></ul><ul><li>Vietnamese </li></ul><ul><li>Tone differences at the phrase and sentence level change meaning from statement to question or indicate emotion </li></ul><ul><li>Initial, medial, and final consonant clusters and blends are common </li></ul><ul><li>Wide range of final consonants used </li></ul><ul><li>Use both aspirated and un-aspirated stops interchangeably </li></ul><ul><li>Tone differences at the word level change the word itself </li></ul><ul><li>No consonant clusters or blends </li></ul><ul><li>Final consonants limited to un-aspirated voiceless stops and nasals </li></ul><ul><li>Most stops are un-aspirated or implosive: there are a few exceptions (e.g. “th” which sounds like there is a long “h” at the end </li></ul>(Tang & Barlow, 2006)
    14. 14. Error’s that may indicate a Speech-Sound DIFFERENCE (Hwa-Froelich &Westby, 2002) (Hwa-Froelich &Westby, 2002) Vietnamese influenced English: Speech Accent Archive
    15. 15. Diagnosing speech sound disorders in Monolingual Vietnamese Children <ul><li>Tang & Barlow’s 2006 study described the speech sound production of 3 monolingual Vietnamese speaking children who were considered highly unintelligible by their families. </li></ul><ul><li>With no recorded data on typical speech development in Vietnamese children the authors merely postulated that the speech of the children in the study must have some atypical sound production patterns due to the reported low intelligibility ratings by their families </li></ul><ul><li>The following characteristics were found in their speech: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Substitution of less complex sounds for more complex ones in place (glottal for alveolar), manner (stops for fricatives), and voicing (de-voicing of voiced sounds) </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Substitutions of more complex sounds in place of less complex ones in place (velar backing) </li></ul></ul>
    16. 16. Diagnosing speech sound disorders in Monolingual Vietnamese Children <ul><li>When compared to typical speech sound development of children who speak Cantonese (a similar language) </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Some backing is evident in typical Cantonese speech sound development but it is rare (less than 6% up to age 4:11 and not reported beyond 4:11) (So & Dodd, 1994 as cited in Tang and Barlow, 2006) </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>It is unclear which speech sound characteristics would be considered typical in speech development of children but consider earlier data indicating backing in the typical characteristics of the southern dialect for the phonemes final /t/ and /k/ (Tang & Barlow, 2006) </li></ul></ul>)
    17. 17. Diagnosing speech sound disorders <ul><li>When evaluating speech sound production of English language learners who’s first language is Vietnamese, the following information/processes may help distinguish differences versus disorder: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Obtain an intelligibility rating in the client’s primary language by a fluent speaker of their dialect. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Observe for error patterns in both languages that are not consistent with common manner, place, or voicing patterns from the primary language </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Look for phoneme substitutions of what are considered to be more complex phonemes for simpler phonemes in both languages as this may indicate atypical patterns </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Involve the family and take into consideration reported speech sound development of siblings </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Compare English speech-sound acquisition of second language learners to norms from similar languages/cultures when data on the exact population is lacking (e.g. Cantonese) </li></ul></ul>
    18. 18. Cultural do’s and don'ts for working with Vietnamese families <ul><li>Conversation and Meetings: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Always approach the oldest person present for information. If they do not know they will refer you to someone who does. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Politeness is demonstrated by speaking softly and being reserved in public places as opposed to outspoken </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Vietnamese parents see teachers as people with authority over schooling and may think teachers incompetent for seeking parent involvement. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Western man (stranger) should not touch a Southeast Asian woman, including shaking hands. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Westerners should not kiss or hug Southeast Asian children in greeting. </li></ul></ul>(sjbreeze, 2010)
    19. 19. Cultural do’s and don'ts for working with Vietnamese families <ul><li>Non-Verbal: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>If you use the “ok” symbol with your hands make sure not to grimace with your face – that can confuse </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Never point to an older person or to someone’s face </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Do not beckon “come here” with your finger as this gesture is intended for animals </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Don’t use waving motions to beckon – it is considered impolite </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Don’t cross your fingers: this is an obscene gesture </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Don’t look directly into someone’s eyes when talking – this is considered impolite </li></ul></ul>(sjbreeze, 2010)
    20. 20. References <ul><li>Bowen, C. (2010, March 23).  Speech therapy in viet nam . Retrieved from http://www.speech-language-therapy.com/vietnam.htm </li></ul><ul><li>Humes, K. R., Jones, N. A., & Ramirez, R. R. (2011). Overview of race and hispanic origin: 2010 (C2010BR-02). Retrieved from U.S. Census Bureau website: http://www.census.gov/prod/cen2010/briefs/c2010br-02.pdf </li></ul><ul><li>Hwa-Froelich, D., Hodson, B., & Edwards, H. (2002). Characteristics of Vietnamese phonology. American Journal of Speech-Language Pathology , 11(3), 264-273. Retrieved from EBSCO host . </li></ul><ul><li>Reeves, T. J., & Bennett, C. E. (2004). We the people: Asians in the united states (CENSR-17). Retrieved from U.S. Census Bureau website: http://www.census.gov/prod/2004pubs/censr-17.pdf </li></ul><ul><li>sjbreeze. (2010, March 18). Vietnam . Retrieved from http://www.multicsd.org/doku.php?id=vietnam </li></ul><ul><li>Tang, G., & Barlow, J. (2006). Characteristics of the sound systems of monolingual Vietnamese-speaking children with phonological impairment. Clinical Linguistics & Phonetics , 20(6), 423-445. Retrieved from EBSCO host . </li></ul>

    ×