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SI 657 - Crowdsourcing Translation and Semi-Connected Content Distribution
SI 657 - Crowdsourcing Translation and Semi-Connected Content Distribution
SI 657 - Crowdsourcing Translation and Semi-Connected Content Distribution
SI 657 - Crowdsourcing Translation and Semi-Connected Content Distribution
SI 657 - Crowdsourcing Translation and Semi-Connected Content Distribution
SI 657 - Crowdsourcing Translation and Semi-Connected Content Distribution
SI 657 - Crowdsourcing Translation and Semi-Connected Content Distribution
SI 657 - Crowdsourcing Translation and Semi-Connected Content Distribution
SI 657 - Crowdsourcing Translation and Semi-Connected Content Distribution
SI 657 - Crowdsourcing Translation and Semi-Connected Content Distribution
SI 657 - Crowdsourcing Translation and Semi-Connected Content Distribution
SI 657 - Crowdsourcing Translation and Semi-Connected Content Distribution
SI 657 - Crowdsourcing Translation and Semi-Connected Content Distribution
SI 657 - Crowdsourcing Translation and Semi-Connected Content Distribution
SI 657 - Crowdsourcing Translation and Semi-Connected Content Distribution
SI 657 - Crowdsourcing Translation and Semi-Connected Content Distribution
SI 657 - Crowdsourcing Translation and Semi-Connected Content Distribution
SI 657 - Crowdsourcing Translation and Semi-Connected Content Distribution
SI 657 - Crowdsourcing Translation and Semi-Connected Content Distribution
SI 657 - Crowdsourcing Translation and Semi-Connected Content Distribution
SI 657 - Crowdsourcing Translation and Semi-Connected Content Distribution
SI 657 - Crowdsourcing Translation and Semi-Connected Content Distribution
SI 657 - Crowdsourcing Translation and Semi-Connected Content Distribution
SI 657 - Crowdsourcing Translation and Semi-Connected Content Distribution
SI 657 - Crowdsourcing Translation and Semi-Connected Content Distribution
SI 657 - Crowdsourcing Translation and Semi-Connected Content Distribution
SI 657 - Crowdsourcing Translation and Semi-Connected Content Distribution
SI 657 - Crowdsourcing Translation and Semi-Connected Content Distribution
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SI 657 - Crowdsourcing Translation and Semi-Connected Content Distribution

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These are slides from a talk given to SI 657 Information Technology and International Development at the School of Information at the University of Michigan. Slides are by Kathleen Omollo and Bob …

These are slides from a talk given to SI 657 Information Technology and International Development at the School of Information at the University of Michigan. Slides are by Kathleen Omollo and Bob Riddle, CC BY Regents of the University of Michigan.

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  • Personal introduction:
    I have been working with open education at University of Michigan and our partner institutions since 2008. My background is in computer science, information science, and public policy. I work with information services for the Medical School, but I partner with other departments on campus, especially the other health sciences. The goal of my department is to enable the right learning for the right people at the right time.
  • Collect feedback from the audience – can do by cards or in large group
  • Our community responded to the call with tremendous enthusiasm. Here are some highlights from our results. We’ve received some additional translations over the past couple weeks that are not represented here. While most videos were completed by a single translator, approximately 1/3 had at least two people, which acted as a control for quality assurance.
    (Next)
  • Due to bandwidth limitations, materials are distributed multiple standard and creative ways, online, offline, and sometimes a hybrid.
    The open educational resources created will be posted on the institutional websites, Saide/OER Africa server in South Africa, and a server in the U.S., the University of Michigan open educational resources website, Open.Michigan (http://open.umich.edu).
    In order to, to enhance discoverability, we promote the resulting learning materials to directories and repositories around the world using metadata and syndication (such RDFa, RSS feeds, and other data export relationships).
    In areas with limited Internet connectivity, the resources may also be made shared with participating partner institutions through offline, removable media (e.g., USB drive, DVD). We have even experimented with adapting a learning module originally designed for access on a computer for offline HTML distribution on mobile phones using a micro SD card or by bluetooth.
    We’re looking at other easily customizable offline distribution models, such as Pirate Box or Library Box, or RaspberryPi (which Marshall Smith mentioned during his keynote yesterday), which can be used to setup a low-cost flexible server that can be accessed by those in range, even without Internet access.
    Even with the various search engines, there is no complete directory of OER, which means sometimes people don’t know where to start. To address this we, created a human-centric OER Search service, which is similar to a reference service offered by libraries. The request is submitted through an online form at http://openmi.ch/request-health-OER, which includes context about the request. To date, we have received and responded to 22 requests.
    (Next.)
    (Learn more at https://open.umich.edu/wiki/Distribution_Flow_and_Model_for_OER)
  • Transcript

    • 1. Approaches for Translation & Adaptable Technologies to Overcome Limited Connectivity Overview of Department / Initiatives Captioning and Translation Flexible Offline Wireless Networks Kathleen Ludewig Omollo, Bob Riddle UMMS Office of Enabling Tech - Open.Michigan Initiative Audience: SI 657 IT and International Development Oct. 31, 2013 Download slides: http://www.slideshare.net/kludewig Except where otherwise noted, this work is available under a Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 License. Copyright 2013 The Regents of the University of Michigan 1
    • 2. Office of Enabling Technologies (part of Medical School Information Services) The Office of Enabling Technologies aims to strategically enhance learning experiences at individual, team, institutional, and international levels through novel uses of information services. By leveraging a diverse toolset of technologies, design and research principles, and interdisciplinary partnerships, we empower our community to lead in the rapidly changing healthcare environment. 2
    • 3. Office of Enabling Technologies Featured Initiatives for Talk • Open.Michigan Initiative • African Health Open Educational Resources Network 3
    • 4. Open.Michigan Initiative Open.Michigan enables University of Michigan faculty, students, staff and others to share their educational resources and research with the world. Our two primary goals: •to sustain a thriving culture of sharing knowledge at U-M; and •to provide comprehensive public access to all of U-M’s scholarly output. 4
    • 5. Open.Michigan: Attributes of Content That Is “Open” Free Public Under some licenses to use, adapt, redistribute 5 Image CC:BY-SA Colleen Simon ( 5
    • 6. Context for Global Activities: Context: Health Disparities Disparities Source: World Health Organization. Working Together for Health: The World Health Report 2006. WHO Publications: Geneva. 2006. 6 6
    • 7. Context for Global Activities: Context: Health Disparities 7 Increased demand for education 7 7 Image CC:BY-NC-SA 350.org (Flickr)
    • 8. Context for Global Activities: Context: Health Disparities 8 Limited space and instructors available 8 8 Image CC:BY-NC University of Ghana
    • 9. Context for Global Activities: Context: Health Disparities 9 Lack of relevant materials When you look in textbooks it’s difficult to find African cases. [S]ometimes it can be confusing when you see something that you see on white skin so nicely and very easy to pick up, but on the dark skin it has a different manifestation that may be difficult to see. 9 Professor at Partner Institution in Ghana Image CC:BY-NC-SA Kwame Nkrumah University of Science and Technology 9
    • 10. 10 Context: Health Network African Health OERDisparities Advance health education in Africa by: •Creating and promoting free, openly licensed teaching materials created by Africans to share knowledge •Identifying and addressing curriculum gaps •Bridging health education communities 10 10 Image CC:BY Sherrie Thai (
    • 11. African Health OER Disparities Network: Context: Health 11 Partners in 2008 11 11
    • 12. African Health OER Disparities Network: Context: Health 12 Current Partners 12 12
    • 13. Captioning and Translation: Context Problem: Most of the Open.Michigan and African Health OER Network materials are in English only. Goal: Make our materials available to a wider audience of learners around the world. 13
    • 14. Captioning and Translation: Considerations • Consent for and copyright of content • Translations are derivative works and require permission from the copyright owner. Use existing openly licensed works. • Professional translators are expensive • Crowdsource, partner, short videos • Tools to manage volunteers/languages • GoogleForm, Amara.org, YouTube 14
    • 15. Captioning and Translation: Lessons 1. Provide captions in source language 2. If instructional, review for quality by subject matter experts 3. Design workflows to accommodate volunteers with varying levels of time commitment, windows of available, levels of subject knowledge and language fluency. 15
    • 16. Captioning and Translation: Lessons 4. Recruit volunteers with the necessary language and subject matter expertise using formal and informal social networks 5. Develop a lexicon of core technical terms for the given subject 6. Use software to manage parallel translations and versioning 16
    • 17. Captioning and Translation: Lessons 7. Arrange proofreading 8. Review formatting of translations for consistency of style 9. Recognize or reward the contributions of volunteers 10. Promote the results (more volunteers, more learners) 17
    • 18. Captioning and Translation: Partners 18
    • 19. Captioning and Translation: Recognizing Volunteers 19
    • 20. Captioning and Translation: Translator View in Amara.org 20 20
    • 21. Translation Captioning and Translation: 21 Delivery on YouTube 21
    • 22. Translation Captioning and Translation: 22 22 Results to Date LANGUAGE # VIDEOS SPANISH (PRIORITY) 28 JAPANESE 22 FRENCH (PRIORITY) 14 # VIDEOS 53 PORTUGUESE (PRIORITY) # LANGUAGES PER VIDEO OTHER THAN ENGLISH RUSSIAN 7 ROMANIAN 5 GANDA 3 SWAHILI (PRIORITY) 2 ARABIC 2 DANISH 1 CHINESE (SIMPLIFIED) 1 CHINESE (TRADITIONAL) TOTAL CAPTIONS 6 3 5 # VOLUNTEERS PER COMPLETED TRANSLATION # CAPTIONS 43 2 2 (TRANSLATOR AND REVIEWER) 4 5 1 96 3 6 TOTAL 2 36 1 1 TOTAL VIDEOS *31 VIDEOS IN ORIGINAL CAMPAIGN AFFILIATION OF VOLUNTEERS # CAPTIONS CONTRIBUTED 139 # VOLUNTEERS CONTRIBUTED 1 OR MORE 1 53 # VOLUNTEERS 27 1 UNIVERSITY OF MICHIGAN ACTIVE MEMBER OR ALUMNI 139 EXTERNAL OR UNKNOWN 35 35 12 MAX = 31 1 MEDIAN 2 MEAN 4.63 22
    • 23. African Health OER Network: Online Distribution Channels 23
    • 24. Content Distribution: Common Challenges in Sub-Saharan Africa • High technology cost • Limited technology availability (equipment, understaffed dept.) • Unpredictable infrastructure noii’s, flickr lydia_shiningbrightly, flickr
    • 25. Offline & Semi-Connected Distribution: Goals • • • • • • provide a local wireless network … provide content via web browser … provide content via file or app server … do this with or without the Internet … do it with or without an electrical outlet … do all of this for <=$200 … 25
    • 26. Offline & Semi-Connected Distribution: Devices Raspberry Pi and TPLink (configured for Library Box) are both solutions for providing digital content to laptops, smartphone, and tablets with wireless network capability in areas with unreliable electricity, no or inadequate Internet service, and limited physical or human infrastructure for technology. Connect the USB storage device and the content is available to users in range of the wireless “neighborhood”. Just plug it in to activate. Unplug it when done. Raspberry Pi Model B 26
    • 27. Offline & Semi-Connected Distribution: Devices Library Box (http://librarybox.us) similarities with Raspberry Pi: •provide digital content over local wireless network capability in areas •Can connect to rechargable battery pack for backup power source •Connect the USB storage device and the content is available to users in range of the wireless “neighborhood” Differences: •PirateBox allows local peer to peer file sharing (read and write). •Library Box is read only for users •Raspberry Pi has a full Linux operating system, which allows full applications and more customization of services (e.g. Dropbox, Moodle), and user interface. 27
    • 28. Questions? Email: open.michigan@umich.edu Translation: http://openmi.ch/translation-overview Offline and Semi-Offline Networks: http://openmi.ch/rasppi-wiki Open.Michigan Website: http://open.umich.edu/ African Health OER Network Newsletter: http://openmi.ch/healthoernetwork-newsletter 28

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