Introduction to Health Open Educational Resources
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Introduction to Health Open Educational Resources

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Presentation slides for HEALTH Alliance OER workshop in Uganda in November 2011

Presentation slides for HEALTH Alliance OER workshop in Uganda in November 2011

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  • Begin with brief introductions: Kathleen, 2010 graduate of SI and the School of Public Policy. Involved in Winter 2008 pilot of dScribe
  • Here’s a quick look at some of the things my colleague and I are going to cover today. We’re going to start out by defining OER and showing you some examples. Then we’re going to talk about the Open.Michigan initiative, which supports the production and publication of OER on our campus. Then we’re going to switch to a more demonstration mode so you can get some hands on experience finding, using, and creating your own OER. So that’s our general plan for today.
  • Several flavors of open education, of which OER are one aspect. OER are developed from resources that can be textbooks, courses, syllabi, projects, image collections, text collections, tutorials, etc. and don ’t have to be associated with a specific course. OCW are materials associated with a specific course, like Nursing 101, that meet that course ’s learning objectives. Open Access are not always openly licensed materials but they are freely accessible materials and can include journals, datasets and other information.
  • Open Access includes: free, permanent, full-text, online access to scientific and scholarly works OER includes openly licensed educational content
  • Selecting a license and displaying it on your work is the first step in creating OER.
  • Two C’s, as opposed to one C
  • OER definition includes remixing, which means derivatives must be allowed
  • This is where open licenses address the gaps in our current system.   As content creators, you take more control over how you want others to use and share your materials and you help other people do this by giving them permission ahead of time.   Open sharing practices encourage the cycle of creativity, learning and ultimately innovation by allowing others to legally build upon each other’s work.   In this way, we allow others to take control over the way they learn and what they learn, curating their own collections of materials and adapting those materials to suit their needs. Licensing provides even more opportunities for sharing and for using these materials in a variety of settings outside of the protected 4 walls of closed education systems allows for teaching and learning to happen formally and informally. Creative Commons are the most used licenses for content but there are software licenses (GNU) that can be used. Share online legally, throughout the world Choose how you would like to share Many of the license allow for adaptation You can choose how you want to share and easily show others how they can use your work. You take an active step toward sharing and making your materials more useful to others. “ Realizing the full potential of the internet — universal access to research, education, full participation in culture, and driving a new era of development, growth, and productivity.” ~ Creative Commons mission
  • Increase the reach of your work: this is what you can do when something is made available under a creative commons license: you can build on someone else’s work and express it in a new way. Our challenge as an institution is to find ways to make our processes transparent and allow our materials to be packaged in ways that are useful and accessible to the global learning community.
  • Here’s a quick look at some of the things my colleague and I are going to cover today. We’re going to start out by defining OER and showing you some examples. Then we’re going to talk about the Open.Michigan initiative, which supports the production and publication of OER on our campus. Then we’re going to switch to a more demonstration mode so you can get some hands on experience finding, using, and creating your own OER. So that’s our general plan for today.
  • Here’s a quick look at some of the things my colleague and I are going to cover today. We’re going to start out by defining OER and showing you some examples. Then we’re going to talk about the Open.Michigan initiative, which supports the production and publication of OER on our campus. Then we’re going to switch to a more demonstration mode so you can get some hands on experience finding, using, and creating your own OER. So that’s our general plan for today.
  • America has the highest percentage of the global healthcare workforce, has the highest relative health expenditures, and among the lowest percentage of Global disease burden. In contrast, Africa represents the lowest percentage of the global healthcare workforce, has the lowest relative health expenditures, and among the highest percentage of Global disease burden.
  • World Health Organization’s recommends of 2.0 doctors and 2.5 nurses per 1000 people. In Ghana, for example, there are only 0.15 doctors and 0.92 nurses per 1,000 Ghanaians, which is well below the WHO recommendation. Ghana ranks among the lowest for healthcare worker density and among the highest in overall mortality. What these charts don’t show, is the disparity in health care access within countries. For example, access to hospitals and physicians is harder in the rural areas of upper peninsula of Michigan than it is here in Ann Arbor. In Africa, hospitals and many healthcare workers are concentrated in the urban areas. There is significantly lower access to healthcare in the rural areas
  • The Ghanaian government aims to triple the number of healthcare workers, but according to a study by Dr. Frank Anderson from University of Michigan, the Ghanaian medical schools can only admit 30% of qualified applicants due to limited faculty size.
  • ~75 US ~180 Ghana ~130 South Africa ~30 Malawi ~17 Kenya
  • 19 Organizations Signed Declaration of Support • OER Africa • University of Michigan • Kwame Nkrumah University of Science and Technology • University of Ghana • University of Cape Town • University of the Western Cape • University of Malawi • Makerere University • EBW Healthcare • Global Health Informatics Partnership • MedEdPORTAL
  • Workshops on: Why OER How to create OER How to find OER How can we promote OER at home institutions and externally
  • We provided ongoing mentorship on OER production and policy to participants through user guides, onsite consultation, email, and conference calls OER request facility

Introduction to Health Open Educational Resources Introduction to Health Open Educational Resources Presentation Transcript

  • Except where otherwise noted, this work is available under a Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 License . Copyright © 2011 The Regents of the University of Michigan and Kwame Nkrumah University of Science and Technology. Introduction to Health Open Educational Resources Ted Hanss, U-M November 21, 2011 HEALTH Alliance OER workshop Slides posted at: http://openmi.ch/halliance-oer
  • what is OER? why OER? African Health OER Network
  • Educational materials and resources offered freely and openly for anyone to use and licensed to be adaptable by others. OCW Materials associated with a specific course in an institution that have been licensed to be adaptable to others. Unrestricted (free) access to online articles, data, knowledge and information for the public good. Open Access
  • The difference between OA, OER & OCW OA : Open Access OER : Open Educational Resources OCW : Open CourseWare OA focuses on sharing content, but no underlying licensing requirement. OER includes any educational content that is shared under an open license. OCW focuses on sharing open content that is developed specifically to instruct a course (locally taught). OCW is a subset of OER. OA OER OCW
  • So, how can you distinguish OER ? Photo by wakingtiger
  •  
  • Open Licenses make it all possible.
  • OER *mostly* uses Creative Commons Licenses
  • All Rights Reserved (default)
  • Creative Commons Some Rights Reserved
  • You let others copy, distribute, display, and perform your copyrighted work but only if they give you credit. BY :: Attribution
  • You let others copy, distribute, display, and perform your copyrighted work but for noncommercial purposes only. NC :: Noncommercial
  • You let others copy, distribute, display, and perform your copyrighted work as long as any derivative work is licensed under the same license. SA :: Share Alike
  • You let others copy, distribute, and display your copyrighted work only if no changes, derivatives, are made. ND :: No derivatives
  • OER Creative Commons: licenses X X
  • Adaptability means… Translation Localization Bridge materials Innovation Collaboration All Rights Reserved Public Domain least restrictive most restrictive Sharing Learning Creativity
  • “ 3 Robots Remix” by jimyounkin CC: BY-NC-SA http://www.flickr.com/photos/jimyounkin/2383652/in/photostream/ “ Untitled” by Erik B CC: BY-NC http://www.flickr.com/photos/erikb/2378157/ From THIS… … to THIS
  • what is OER? why OER? African Health OER Network
    • benefits of OER: for the university
    • share expertise and curricula with other institutions
    • recruit better students
    • decrease duplication, increase efficiency
    • increase university’s reputation globally
  • benefits of OER: for faculty recognition for their teaching publish and promote their resources connect with other collaborators extend their reach and visibility
  • benefits of OER: faculty perspective from University Ghana (UG) The U-M Medical and Dental schools collaborate with several African universities for health OER
  • faculty perspective from UG In http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=KHLFSFhvBpA their own words:
  • what is OER? why OER? African Health OER Network
  • CHALLENGE
    • The inadequate density and distribution of healthcare providers negatively affects health outcomes around the globe. This is especially true in Sub-Saharan Africa.
  • Source: World Health Organization. Working Together for Health: The World Health Report 2006 . WHO Publications: Geneva. 2006.
  • Source: World Health Organization. Working Together for Health: The World Health Report 2006 . WHO Publications: Geneva. 2006.
  • CONTEXT: FACULTY CAPACITY
    • A key barrier is the lack of instructor capacity to teach basic and clinical sciences.
      • Example: Ghana medical schools can only admit 30% of qualified applicants.
    • This is complicated by the duplication of effort in developing learning materials.
  • CONTEXT: CROWDED WARD ROUNDS
    • http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=iFjJe8ZJkJU (1 min, KNUST Student)
    Ward Rounds. Photo by: University of Ghana. Ward Rounds at Kwame Nkrumah University of Science and Technology. Photo by: Cary Engleberg
    • Kwame Nkrumah University of Science and Technology (KNUST) (Ghana)
    • Peter Donkor
    • Pro Vice Chancellor, former Provost of the College of Health Sciences
    • http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=AR31aCaj60Q
    • (90 seconds)
    WHY OER? Kwame Nkrumah University of Science and Technology. Photo by: The Regents of the University of Michigan
  • WHY OER? When you look in textbooks it’s difficult to find African cases. The cases may be pretty similar but sometimes it can be confusing when you see something that you see on a white skin so nicely and very easy to pick up, but on the dark skin it has a different manifestation that may be difficult to see. Sometimes it is difficult for the students to appreciate when they see a clinical case that involves an African. I think that [locally developed] OER will go a long way in helping the students appreciate the cases that we see in our part of the world. -Richard Phillips, lecturer, Department of Internal Medicine, KNUST Kwame Nkrumah University of Science and Technology.
  • WHAT IS “THE NETWORK”?
    • The mission of the African Health OER Network is to advance health education in Africa by using open educational resources (OER) developed by and targeted toward Africans in order to share knowledge, address curriculum gaps, and support communities around health education.
  • History of the African Health OER Network
  • PARTICIPANT MAP - INDIVIDUALS 85 Individuals Signed Declaration of Support http://batchgeo.com/map/d70937ef6be461a3571274817b590a52
  • PARTICIPANT MAP ORGANIZATIONS http://batchgeo.com/map/a70a5bf6278d936e23737b968fc5317c 19 Organizations Signed Declaration of Support • OER Africa • University of Michigan • Kwame Nkrumah University of Science and Technology • University of Ghana • University of Cape Town • University of the Western Cape • University of Malawi • Makerere University • EBW Healthcare • Global Health Informatics Partnership • MedEdPORTAL
  • APPROACH
    • The Network is building the socio-technical infrastructure to draw in more African and, eventually, global participants, while also developing models of collaboration and sustainability that can be replicated in other regions of the world.
  • ACTIVITIES: TRAINING/WORKSHOPS OER Africa Convening, 2011. Photo by: Saide.
  • ACTIVITIES: MENTORING/CONSULTING Photo by: Re-ality ( Flickr ) Photo by: Sara Grajeda ( Flickr ) Students in line for computer lab at University of Ghana Photo by: The Regents of the University of Michigan ( flickr ) Dkscully ( flickr )
  • ACTIVITIES: PLATFORMS & DISTRIB. Power outages are common. Bandwidth is very expensive. OER is distributed offline and online by authoring institutions and the two Network co-facilitators, OER Africa and U-M. Learn more: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=qMiObNC3KYI (12 minutes)
  •  
  • IMPACT -ALUMNI
    • University of Ghana
    • http://www.youtu.be/zzh1wybPf6o
    • (1:30 min)
    University of Ghana. Photo by: The Regents of the University of Michigan.
  • IMPACT
    • Participants are interested in connecting with colleagues at other institutions for the purpose of sharing knowledge.
    • At least 5 institutions have used or adapted OER from elsewhere.
    • Two institutions have successfully integrated students into the design process for OER, freeing up faculty time for other activities.
  •  
  •  
  • CONCLUDING REMARKS
    • OER is seen as means to streamlining health education, not an end in itself.
    “ Share your ideas ” by britbohlinger
  • QUESTIONS
    • Email:
    • [email_address]
    • Websites
    • http://www.oerafrica.org/healthoer (primary)
    • http://open.umich.edu/education/med/oernetwork/
  • Many slides in this presentation were produced in collaboration with Garin Fons, Pieter Kleymeer, Kathleen Ludewig Omollo, Greg Grossmeier, Emily Puckett Rodgers, and Susan Topol.