OER activities through University of Michigan, African Health OER Network, and Beyond
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OER activities through University of Michigan, African Health OER Network, and Beyond

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In November 2011, I was invited to give a presentation about OER at U-M, KNUST, and the larger African Health OER Network to 70-80 third- and final year Department of Communication Design (DeCoDe) ...

In November 2011, I was invited to give a presentation about OER at U-M, KNUST, and the larger African Health OER Network to 70-80 third- and final year Department of Communication Design (DeCoDe) Students in the College of Arts at KNUST.

This 75 minute presentation-discussion focused on: What are OER?
Origins of African Health OER Network; Activities of African Health OER Network; Origins of OER at University of Michigan; OER activities within University of Michigan; Other Student-Led OER activities around the world; Collective Brainstorming for OER at DeCoDe; and Concluding Remarks.

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  • Begin with brief introductions: Kathleen, 2010 graduate of SI and the School of Public Policy. Involved in Winter 2008 pilot of dScribe
  • The Ghanaian government aims to triple the number of healthcare workers, but according to a study by Dr. Frank Anderson from University of Michigan, the Ghanaian medical schools can only admit 30% of qualified applicants due to limited faculty size.
  • The Ghanaian government aims to triple the number of healthcare workers, but according to a study by Dr. Frank Anderson from University of Michigan, the Ghanaian medical schools can only admit 30% of qualified applicants due to limited faculty size.
  • ~75 US ~180 Ghana ~130 South Africa ~30 Malawi ~17 Kenya
  • 19 Organizations Signed Declaration of Support • OER Africa • University of Michigan • Kwame Nkrumah University of Science and Technology • University of Ghana • University of Cape Town • University of the Western Cape • University of Malawi • Makerere University • EBW Healthcare • Global Health Informatics Partnership • MedEdPORTAL
  • Workshops on: Why OER How to create OER How to find OER How can we promote OER at home institutions and externally
  • We provided ongoing mentorship on OER production and policy to participants through user guides, onsite consultation, email, and conference calls OER request facility
  • The Ghanaian government aims to triple the number of healthcare workers, but according to a study by Dr. Frank Anderson from University of Michigan, the Ghanaian medical schools can only admit 30% of qualified applicants due to limited faculty size.
  • https://open.umich.edu/
  • https://open.umich.edu/education/si/si563-fall2008
  • 01/26/10 01/26/10
  • 01/26/10 01/26/10
  • Welcome to our presentation How to “Find, Use, Remix, and Create Open Learning Materials.”
  • 01/26/10
  • or even a textbook Example #1 Chemical Engineering Open wiki Textbook by Peter Woolf This project is a collaboration between the faculty and students of the University of Michigan chemical engineering department. It is a student-contributed open-source text covering the materials used at Michigan in a senior level course. The goal of this project is to provide the greater chemical engineering community with a useful, relevant, high quality, and free resource describing chemical process control and modeling. Initial construction of this resource began in Fall 2006. Example #2 High Performance Computing Open Textbook by Charles Severance High Performance Computing, originally published by O’Reilly–but out of print since 2003, has been republished on Connexions. Book author Charles Severance, with his editor Mike Loukides, worked with O’Reilly to release the book under a CC-BY license, then coordinated with the Connexions staff to republish it. The book is now freely available on the web and in PDF. Printed copies are available on-demand for the cost of printing and shipping. The CC-BY license also makes it possible for the entire contents of the book to be remixed and republished by anyone. (Note that Merlot allows CC licenses to be added to their submissions, these licenses enable us to pull content from Merlot and publish it in our collection.)
  • A student peer-reviewed scholarly journal like this example from the School of Social Work. A student handbook for traveling and doing research abroad, created with the support of the Center for Global Health, which is coupled with an interactive Google site that features discussion groups, an events calendar, and other resources.
  • A student peer-reviewed scholarly journal like this example from the School of Social Work. A student handbook for traveling and doing research abroad, created with the support of the Center for Global Health, which is coupled with an interactive Google site that features discussion groups, an events calendar, and other resources.
  • Or a blog posting.
  • 01/26/10

OER activities through University of Michigan, African Health OER Network, and Beyond OER activities through University of Michigan, African Health OER Network, and Beyond Presentation Transcript

  • Except where otherwise noted, this work is available under a Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 License . Copyright © 2011 The Regents of the University of Michigan and Kwame Nkrumah University of Science and Technology. OER activities through University of Michigan, African Health OER Network, and Beyond Kathleen Ludewig Omollo, U-M 3 November 2011 KNUST DeCoDe Guest Talk Presentation to be posted at http://www.slideshare.net/group/openmichigan
  • Outline
    • What are OER?
    • Origins of African Health OER Network
    • Activities of African Health OER Network
    • Origins of OER at University of Michigan
    • OER activities within University of Michigan
    • Other Student-Led OER activities
    • Collective Brainstorming
    • Concluding Remarks and Next Steps
  • What are OER? Open Educational Resources (OER) are educational materials that have been openly licensed and are available for use and reuse in local contexts. Open means both free and licensed. View slide
  • What is OER? CC BY U-M. Full poster at http://open.umich.edu/sites/default/files/howto-create-share-connect-poster.pdf View slide
  • Photo by wakingtiger
  • History of the African Health OER Network
  • Context: Crowded Ward Rounds
    • http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=iFjJe8ZJkJU (1 min, KNUST Student)
    Ward Rounds. Photo by: University of Ghana. Ward Rounds at Kwame Nkrumah University of Science and Technology. Photo by: Cary Engleberg
  • Why OER? When you look in textbooks it’s difficult to find African cases. The cases may be pretty similar but sometimes it can be confusing when you see something that you see on a white skin so nicely and very easy to pick up, but on the dark skin it has a different manifestation that may be difficult to see. Sometimes it is difficult for the students to appreciate when they see a clinical case that involves an African. I think that [locally developed] OER will go a long way in helping the students appreciate the cases that we see in our part of the world. -Richard Phillips, lecturer, Department of Internal Medicine, KNUST Kwame Nkrumah University of Science and Technology.
  • What Is “The Network”?
    • The mission of the African Health OER Network is to advance health education in Africa by using open educational resources (OER) developed by and targeted toward Africans in order to share knowledge, address curriculum gaps, and support communities around health education.
  • Participant Map - Individuals 85 Individuals Signed Declaration of Support http://batchgeo.com/map/d70937ef6be461a3571274817b590a52
  • Participant Map - Organizations http://batchgeo.com/map/a70a5bf6278d936e23737b968fc5317c 19 Organizations Signed Declaration of Support • OER Africa • University of Michigan • Kwame Nkrumah University of Science and Technology • University of Ghana • University of Cape Town • University of the Western Cape • University of Malawi • Makerere University • EBW Healthcare • Global Health Informatics Partnership • MedEdPORTAL
  • Approach
    • The Network is building the socio-technical infrastructure to draw in more African and, eventually, global participants, while also developing models of collaboration and sustainability that can be replicated in other regions of the world.
  • Activities: Training/Workshops OER Africa Convening, 2011. Photo by: Saide.
  • Activities: Mentoring/Consulting Photo by: Re-ality ( Flickr ) Photo by: Sara Grajeda ( Flickr ) Students in line for computer lab at University of Ghana Photo by: The Regents of the University of Michigan ( flickr ) Dkscully ( flickr )
  • Activities: Platforms & Distrib. Power outages are common. Bandwidth is very expensive. OER is distributed offline and online by authoring institutions and the two Network co-facilitators, OER Africa and U-M. Learn more: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=qMiObNC3KYI (12 minutes)
  • Activities: Platforms & Distrib. University of Malawi Kamuzu College of Nursing. Photo by: Saide.
  •  
  • Origins of OER at University of Michigan
    • 2006-8, School of Information research
    • 2007, Dean of U-M Medical School Commitment
    • 2008, Open.Michigan Initiative
    • Our mission is to help faculty, enrolled students, staff, and self-motivated learners maximize the impact of their creative and academic work by making it open and accessible to the public.
    We help U-M and the world to : View and download course materials and educational resources made by the U-M community Learn how to create your own open resources and share them on the web using tools and guides. Explore the U-M open community and its many projects. Who http://open.umich.edu/
    • Includes:
      • Lecture slides
      • Audio and video
      • Image banks
      • Syllabi
      • Reading Lists
      • Assignments
      • Bibliographies
    • Any materials associated with teaching and learning!
    What
  • http://open.umich.edu/about/infokit
  • http://www.slideshare.net/group/openmichigan/slideshows/
    • Workshops and Events
    • How to create OER?
    • Why create or use OER?
    • How to find OER?
    • Design challenges for new materials that would be OER
  • Pop quiz
  • True or False: In order for an object to qualify for copyright protection, it must be marked with a (C) symbol False. See: The Berne Convention Implementation Act of 1988 (BCIA).
  • True or false: A work must be published and registered in order to be granted copyright protection. False.
  • End pop quiz
  • “ Open Licenses”
  • OER *mostly* uses Creative Commons Licenses
  • Creative Commons
  •  
  • Creative Commons: licenses
  • OER Creative Commons: licenses X X
  • Some rights reserved: a spectrum for OER least restrictive most restrictive Public Domain All Rights Reserved X X X
  • What does this mean for authors?
  • Find, Use, Remix, and Create Open Learning Materials Enriching Scholarship, 6 May 2011 Susan Topol, Kathleen Ludewig Omollo Image from opensourceway ( flickr ) under a Creative Commons BY-SA license Copyright © 2011 The Regents of the University of Michigan Except where otherwise noted, this work is available under a Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 License.
  • Phalaenopsis audreyjm529 orchis galilaea CC:BY-SA judy_breck (flickr) http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/2.0/deed.en Angraecum viguieri GNU free documentation orchi (wikipedia) Attributions Author, title source, license
  • Attributions page at end Title slide: CC: Seo2 | Relativo & Absoluto (flickr) http://www.flickr.com/photos/seo2/2446816477/ | http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0/deed.en Slide 1 CC:BY-SA Jot Powers (wikimedia commons) http://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Bounty_hunter_2.JPG | http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/2.0/ Slide 2 CC: BY-NC Brent and MariLynn (flickr) http://www.flickr.com/photos/brent_nashville/2960420853/ | http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/2.0/deed.en Slide 3 http://www.newvideo.com/productdetail.html?productid=NV-AAE-71919 Slide 4 Public Domain: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:Hummer-H3.JPG Slide 5 Source: Undetermined from a variety of searches on Monster Truck Documentary Slide 6 Source: Mega-RC.com http://www.mega-rc.com/MRCImages/Asscd_Mnstr_GT_ShockOPT.jpg Slide 7 CC:BY-NC GregRob (flickr) http://www.flickr.com/photos/gregrob/2139442260/ | http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/2.0/deed.en Slide 8 CC:BY metaphor91 (flickr) http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0/deed.en
  • What is dScribe?
    • dScribe, which stands for "digital and distributed scribes," builds on the idea that by distributing tasks across a variety of interested people and using digital tools and resources we can potentially lower the cost, time, and overall effort required to create OER.
  •  
  • dScribes assist authors to make work available as OER.
  • what types of third-party (i.e. created by someone other than the author) objects might there be have in the content?
  • what should the author or dScribe do with those third-party objects?
  • possible actions :: retain : keep the content because it is licensed under an Open license or is in the public domain :: replace : you may want to replace content that is not Openly licensed (and thus not shareable) :: remove : you may need to remove content due to privacy, endorsement or copyright concerns
  • Why be a dScribe at U-M?
    • Build skills and knowledge around open access, OER, copyright, and copyleft
    • Collaborate w/ other dedicated classmates, staff, and faculty
    • Make resources more widely available (classmates, alumni, universal access) with recognition
    • Review topic or course content
    • Free food
    • Course or internship credit
    • Possibility of future part-time or full-time employment
  •  
  • http://openbadges.org/
  • In addition to participating as dScribes, some students have also authored OER.
  • http://open.umich.edu/education/engin/che/che466/fall2008
  • http://open.umich.edu/education/ssw/resources/michigan-journal-social-work/2010
  • http://open.umich.edu/education/sph/resources/student-handbook-global-engagement/2011
  •  
  • dScribes outside of U-M openmichigan, Flickr (UCT, South Africa) openmichigan, Flickr (KNUST, Ghana) openmichigan, Flickr (UCT, South Africa)
  • Student –driven OER activities Elsewhere
    • Pontifical Catholic University of Peru
    • International Association for Political Science Students
    • University of Berkeley DeCal - http://www.decal.org/courses/1460
    • Students for Free Culture - http://freeculture.org/
    • University of Cape Town Faculty of Health Sciences – Student Recommended OER
  • Collective Brainstorming: Past Events
  • https://open.umich.edu/wiki/Health_OER_Network_Design_Jam_March_2010
  • https://open.umich.edu/wiki/Health_OER_Network_Design_Jam_November_2010
  • https://open.umich.edu/wiki/%27Textbook%27_of_the_Future
  • DeCoDe Collective Brainstorming
    • How can you grow OER with DeCoDe course/instructional content and/or DeCoDe students providing technical support?
    • How can you mobilize the unique skills of DeCoDe students to raise awareness of OER across campus?
  • Concluding Remarks
    • OER is seen as means to streamlining health (and other disciplines) education, not an end in itself.
    • African colleagues have specialized knowledge that can be useful to health professionals worldwide.
    • KNUST Communication Design students possess many skills that can enhance OER.
  • QUESTIONS
    • Email:
    • [email_address]
    • Websites
    • http://open.umich.edu
    • http://www.oerafrica.org/healthoer http://open.umich.edu/education/med/oernetwork/
  • Many slides in this presentation were produced in collaboration with Garin Fons, Pieter Kleymeer, Kathleen Ludewig Omollo, Greg Grossmeier, Emily Puckett Rodgers, and Susan Topol.