Refreshing your senses with mla
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  • 1. Mr. C. McFeely-Student Teacher-Clarion University
  • 2.
    • While it may seem tedious, it is necessary!
    • Post-Secondary institutions require the use of formatting styles most notably MLA, and APA depending on your teacher, and what field of study you are in.
    • The consequences of failing to cite, or failing to cite properly (conduct board)
  • 3.
    • In-text or parenthetical citations
    • Direct Quotations
    • Block quotes
    • MLA citations-online databases, and websites.
    • Sample Works Cited Page
    • OWL Purdue website
    • Style guides
    • Activity
    • Exit-Slip
  • 4.
    • The rules for in-text citations are as follows:
      • Usually, the author’s last name and page number
    • Note punctuation
      • Ex. This point has been argued before (Frye 197).
    • Author’s name in text
    • Do not use the author’s last name in the citation if the author’s name appears in the text
      • Ex. Frye has argued this point before (197).
  • 5.
    • If your source has two authors:
    • Alphabetically by last name and page number
    • Note punctuation (outside of the parenthesis)
      • Ex. Others hold an opposite view (Warren and Wellek 310-15).
    • Do not use the authors’ last names in the citation if the authors’ names appear in the text
      • Ex. Others, like Wellek and Warren (310-15), hold an opposite view.
  • 6.
    • If by chance you have more than three authors:
    • List only first author’s last name followed by “et al.” and the page number
    • Ex. Emotional security varies depending on the circumstances of the social interaction (Carter
    • et al. 158).
    • Do not use the authors’ last names in the citation if the authors’ names appear in the text
    • Ex. Carter et al. argues that emotional security varies depending on the circumstances of the social interaction (158).
  • 7.
    • Direct quotes:
    • Direct quotations with one or multiple authors are cited as previously mentioned with a slight difference, the difference is where the citation is placed in reference to the quote
    • Citation is placed after quotation mark
      • Ex. It may be true that “in the appreciation of medieval art the attitude of the observer is of primary importance” (Robertson 136).
    • Do not use the authors’ last names in the citation if the authors’ names appear in the text
    • Citation is placed after quotation mark
      • Ex. Ernest Rose writes, “The highly spiritual view of the world presented in Siddhartha exercised its appeal on West and East alike” (74).
  • 8.
    • Block Quotes
    • Block quotes are used only when quoting more than 4 lines (not sentences)
    • The entire block quote is indented
    • Only used when author is mentioned in the text
    • Page number at end is outside the period
    • Quotation marks are not used
    • Entire block quote is double spaced .
    • Ex. In his essay “Primitive and Pastoral Elements in Sherwood Anderson,” Glen Love states that George Willard’s departure from Winesburg to a life in the city represents Anderson’s attempts to connect America’s rural heritage to the modern world:
      • Both the artist and his audience knew too well that they could not take to the woods or countryside. Yet Anderson’s literary works as well as the record of his personal life suggest that he actually believed that there is the possibility, if not of reclaiming the idealized pastoral myth, of at least making a new start based upon some of its enduring values. (245)
  • 9.
    • Article accessed through a library subscription service:
    • Author’s last name, Author’s first name. “Title of Article.” Title of Publication Volume (Year of
    • publication): pages article can be found. Name of database . Library Name, School library is located in.
    • Day Month Abbreviation. Publication medium. Year article accessed.<web address>.
    • Jackson, Gabriel. “Multiple Historic Meanings of the Spanish Civil War.” Science and Society 68.3 (2004): 272-76. Academic Search Premier Elite . EBSCO. Brookens Library, U of Illinois at Springfield. Web. 27 Sept.2002.
  • 10.
    • An article from the Web:
    • Author(s). &quot;Title of Article.&quot; Title of Online Publication. Date of Publication. Date of Access <electronic address>.
    • Bernstein, Mark. &quot;10 Tips on Writing The Living Web.&quot; A List Apart: For People Who Make Websites . No. 149 (16 Aug. 2002). Web. 4 May 2006
  • 11.
    • Bernstein, Barton J. “Atomic Diplomacy: Hiroshima and Nagasaki.” Diplomatic History 28.3 (1991): 126-29. Print.
    • The Chicago Manual of Style . 15th ed. Chicago: U of Chicago P, 2003. Print.
    • Crane, Niles F. “Anarchy at Sea.” Atlantic Monthly Sept. 2003: 50-80. Print.
    • Creation of the Media: Political Origins of the Media . Los Angeles: Houghton-Mifflin, 1922. Print.
    • Green, Joshua. “The Rove Presidency.” The Atlantic.com . Atlantic Monthly Group, Sept. 2007. Web. 15 May 2008.
    • Jackson, Gabriel. “Multiple Historic Meanings of the Spanish Civil War.” Science and Society 68.3 (2004): 272-76. Academic
    • Search Premier Elite . EBSCO. Brookens Library, U of Illinois at Springfield. Web. 27 Sept.2002.
  • 12.
    • The OWL Purdue website is a FREE virtual MLA handbook. This is a website that will prove to be an invaluable resource to you.
    • The site is maintained by the Purdue University English department, and is regularly updated.
    • http://owl.english.purdue.edu/owl/resource/747/01/
  • 13.
    • *See style guides that have been provided.
  • 14.
    • “ MLA Citation Methods.” Center of Teaching and Learning at UIS. ( 22 July 2008). Web. 29 January 2012. <http://www.uis.edu>
    • The Purdue OWL . Purdue U Writing Lab, 2010. Web. 29 January 2012.
  • 15.
    • Do you have any questions for me?
  • 16.
    • Now it is time for you to put into practice what I have shown you.
    • Please take the MLA style sheet for online databases.
    • I would like you to explore the online databases that we subscribe to, and when you find the sources fill out the MLA style sheet appropriately.
  • 17. Directions
    • Using the Library Wiki page, click the library databases tab on the left side of the page, then click on the Bloom’s literary reference online link. If prompted for the login use: butlersh as the username, and library as the password.
    • Then, click How to write on the right hand side of your screen.
    • After you click on this, and scroll down the page, you will see lists of various authors. Click on the authors name, and a list of sub-headings appears. Choose one of the subheadings, this will take you to an article. Examine the article and fill out the appropriate database MLA style sheet.
    • Find one other article for a different author, and repeat the process.
  • 18.
    • Please, fill out the exit slip prior to leaving today.
    • DO NOT put your name on the exit slip, this slip is only going to be used to help me improve the lesson.
    • Thank you!