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Cheese reference 1509 platina, italy
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Cheese reference 1509 platina, italy

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  • 1. http://www.renaissance-spell.com/Renaissance-Food.htmlCheeseIn 1509, Platina, although an Italian, in speaking of good cheeses, mentions the Frenchcheeses: those of Chauny, in Picardy, and of Brehemont, in Touraine. Charles Estiennepraises those of Craponne, in Auvergne, the angelots of Normandy, and the cheeses madefrom fresh cream which the peasant-women of Montreuil and Vincennes brought to Parisin small wickerwork baskets, and which were eaten sprinkled with sugar. The sameauthor names also the rougerets of Lyons, which were always much esteemed; but, aboveall the cheeses of Europe, he places the round or cylindrical ones of Auvergne, whichwere only made by very clean and healthy children of fourteen years of age. Olivier deSerres advises those who wish to have good cheeses to boil the milk before churning it, aplan which is in use at Lodi and Parma, "where cheeses are made which areacknowledged by all the world to be excellent." The parmesan, which this celebratedagriculturist cites as an example, only became the fashion in France on the return ofCharles VIII. from his

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