PDA,
DDA,
UDA
—OMG!
What is PDA, DDA, UDA?
 “Patron Driven Acquisition” (PDA)
“An e-book purchasing model, first introduced by NetLibrary, in...
Aggregators: PDA/DDA/UDA models
Ebrary
• Owned by ProQuest
(2011)
• Founded in 1999
• SUPO (single user) is
primary model
...
Publishers: PDA/DDA/UDA models
DeGruyter
Patron-Driven
Acquisitions
October 2012
Journal articles, book
chapters, ebooks
L...
Sam Houston State University: PDA/DDA program
Ebrary
• June 2010—
August 2011
• eBook PDA
• Purchased
immediately upon
1st...
SHSU Patron-Driven Acquisition eBook Usage
0
335
654
539
53
455
327
374
264
27
221
68 68 68
3
0
100
200
300
400
500
600
70...
SHSU Patron-Driven Acquisition Expenditures
Ebrary:
Fiscal Year 2011
(June 2010-Aug 2011)
Short Term Loans
Ebooks, purchas...
Acquisitions Challenges: PDA/DDA programs
• De-Duplication
• System limitations
• Currency of our list of
owned/subscribed...
LOOKING BACK
Better supporting our distance-education and online courses
Greatly reducing the amount of time between a pat...
CATALOGING PDA RECORDS
An overview of Sam Houston State University’s PDA Record Processing Workflow
Cataloging PDA Records
PDA and the Library Catalog –
Why integrate records?
PDA and the Library Catalog – Why Integrate Records?
Non-Integrated
PDA and the Library Catalog – Why Integrate Records?
Integrated
PDA and the Library Catalog – Why Integrate Records?
Why not integrate?
• Initial processing time requirements
• Maintenan...
Cataloging PDA Records - Workflow
Cataloging PDA Records – Stage 1
Analyzing Records
• Request sample
• Compare records to records currently in your library...
Cataloging PDA Records – Stage 1
Analyzing Records Continued…
Sample PDA Record
Cataloging PDA Records – Stage 2
Processing Records
• Efficient processing of large groups of
records requires batch modif...
Cataloging PDA Records – Stage 2
MarcEdit: Features
• MARC Editing
• RDA Helper
• Delimited Text Translator
• Export as Ta...
Cataloging PDA Records – Stage 2
MarcEdit & Regular Expressions
Primary RegEx components used in MarcEdit
• Character esca...
Cataloging PDA Records – Stage 2
Processing Continued:
Translating requirements into regular expression commands
Cataloging PDA Records – Stage 2
Processing Continued:
Converting individual commands into tasks, and tasks into conglomer...
Cataloging PDA Records – Stage 2
Processing Continued:
Translating requirements into regular expression commands
• Tag fie...
Cataloging PDA Records – Stage 3
Importing Records Continued:
Maintaining separate locations for PDA resources and purchas...
LOOKING BACK
• Research load limits associated with your ILS
• Perform small test loads before graduating to larger loads
...
LOOKING AHEAD
• Considering 1-2 Usage-Driven Acquisitions programs
• Is continued higher use of purchased eBooks likely?
•...
Q&A plus Group Discussion
DISCUSSION
• What are you doing in your library?
• Positive or Negative experience with
PDA/DDA/...
Resources & Acknowledgements
 Slide 2
 “Patron Driven Acquisitions” ODLIS http://www.abc-clio.com/ODLIS/odlis_p.aspx
 S...
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PDA, DDA, UDA --- OMG!

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Two Technical Services librarians from Sam Houston State University provide an initial explanation of the many iterations of PDA, and then share their experiences, frustrations, and lessons learned as well as contemplate the future of this acquisition model in academic libraries.
Presented at TLA District 8 Fall Conference 2014 at San Jacinto Community College on October 18, 2014.

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  • Welcome to a discussion of the many variations of patron or demand driven acquisition models. My name is Kat Landry Mueller and I am the Monographs Acquisitions Librarian at Sam Houston State University. My colleague Zach Valdes is the Special Formats Cataloger. We both started our full-time careers as librarians in September 2012 and our first big project was to set-up and oversee an eBook PDA. After an initial explanation of the many iterations of PDA, we will share some of our learning experiences, frustrations, and lessons learned. Then we will open it up for discussion of any of your experiences with PDA/DDA/UDA as well as contemplate the future of this acquisition model.
  • The expenditures overall show that with the option of Short Term Loans, ebooks purchased is decreased and overall expeditures were reduced. While we do not yet have enough data on EBL DDA yet, the data is currently skewing towards significantly more loans than purchased ebooks.
  • Deduplication was a major issue with our Ebrary PDA. The system had limitations on how we could upload our ISBN list to de-duplicate our PDA profile against (20,000 each time and our list was over 200,000). For our Ebrary PDA programs, there was a lot of staff time and effort spent doing this initially and also attempting to repeat so any purchase made outside the PDA would not be duplicated in PDA loans/auto-purchases. EBL has been much more “hands-off” where you just send them the ISBN list and they de-duplicate your profile from the vendor’s side. Questions remain on how often it is feasible for us to send them this list to keep our profile currently. Debating quarterly?
    Communication between Cataloging and Acquisitions quickly took a front seat. The Special Formats Cataloger had to know when a PDA title was triggered for purchase so the Item Location, and 899 field could be updated. EBL and Ebrary currently offer different methods for obtaining new records that match your profile. While both systems send you email alerts of new eBooks matching your PDA profile’s criteria - Ebrary’s is currently much more library-managed and requires staff time to go into the Admin module and retrieve the new MARC records (and their system frequently timed out). EBL has been much more user-friendly since we are able to get initial and any new matching records via OCLC Knowledge Base Collection (already a subscriber). (?) Lastly, training was reviewed a few times when inadvertent overlay of print (or outside eBook) acquisition bib records onto PDA records happened. Largely this happened when using the SmartPort wizard within our SIRSI ILS.
    We also struggled previously to maintain accurate currency of the PDA records in our catalog when Ebrary would remove titles without notice. This frustrated patrons and librarians alike since we had a record in our catalog which was inaccessible. Staff Time involved maintaining a PDA is a big concern for libraries. Ebrary was much more of time-investment for us personally. As mentioned, the de-duplication frustrations and titles moving-in/out were two of our biggest issues, however Acquisitions also monitored turnaways, which was occasionally a problem with the SUPO model (and still is for our owned Ebrary titles). EBL set-up seemed much more streamlined and technical service was very communicative (along with our dedicated rep). However… some of our settings (non-mediated loans, high price point, etc.) allow for that. If your library chose to do mediated loans and/or purchases, it would require significantly additional staff time.
  • Picture of resources page showing main SHSU page, then vendor page, then EBL page
  • We are considering trying a couple of the Usage-Driven Acquisitions programs offered by vendors to see if these generate higher continued use of purchased eBooks. Largely this will depend on how much we have available in the budget to invest in trying this new acquisitions model
    Usage Driven Acquisition is also attractive because librarians will still retain control over which titles are permanently added to the library’s collection. This is important since PDA titles have thus far tend to be introductory or non-scholarly materials. However which publisher we decide to try will likely be determined after evaluating what ebooks/journal articles (if applicable) we already normally purchase, and the usage statistics on those items.


    Interestingly we have had much greater interest in streamed videos by students, faculty and librarians. While we do subscribe to several streaming video packages (Adam Matthews, Alexander Street Press, etc.) – there are still videos requested but not available in our current collections. Since we have recently begun using Kanopy as a hosting service for owned videos – their PDA streaming video collections may be something of interest in the future.

    Finally, there have been discussion and presentations at other conferences (ER&L 2013) regarding Patron or Demand Driven Acquisition models for serials/journals. As neither of us handle Serials, we are not experts in this field but the complexity of print serials does not seem to diminish if the format moves to electronic. Custom holdings would make de-duplication even more difficult than ebooks, as well as discontinued and transferred titles would seemingly create an endless flow of maintenance and review for the librarians to be responsible for.


  • PDA, DDA, UDA --- OMG!

    1. 1. PDA, DDA, UDA —OMG!
    2. 2. What is PDA, DDA, UDA?  “Patron Driven Acquisition” (PDA) “An e-book purchasing model, first introduced by NetLibrary, in which selection decisions are based on input from library patrons. Working with the vendor, the librarian establishes an approval profile based on classification, subject, educational level, publication date, cost, and other criteria. E-book titles matching the profile are then shared with the library's community of users via MARC records in the online catalog. When a specific e-book has been discovered and viewed a predetermined number of times, it is automatically purchased for the collection. Libraries with limited budgets can set spending limits on their PDA plans. Variations on this model have been developed by Ingram's MyiLibrary and by Ebook Library (EBL). Synonymous with demand-driven acquisitions.” ODLIS http://www.abc-clio.com/ODLIS/odlis_p.aspx  “Demand Driven Acquisition” (DDA) Generally understood to be a synonym of PDA. Some publishers/vendors prefer this label for their model.  “Usage Driven Acquisitions” (UDA) Recently emerged eBook purchasing model, closely related to PDA/DDA. It differs in requiring an upfront monetary commitment or deposit. This gives the library access to a defined collection of content. At the end of the agreed upon time period, usage stats of the accessible content is provided to the library. The library then decides which titles to own. The list prices of titles chosen generally total to the amount of initial commitment/deposit.  “Evidence Based Acquisitions” Another new label within PDA/DDA models. Seems most similar to Usage-Driven Acquistion
    3. 3. Aggregators: PDA/DDA/UDA models Ebrary • Owned by ProQuest (2011) • Founded in 1999 • SUPO (single user) is primary model • Ebooks are purchased after 1st, 2nd, or 3rd loan. EBL • Owned by ProQuest • Launched in 2004 • Non-Linear Lending is primary model • EBooks purchased after preset number of loans. (1-7, set by library) MyiLibrary • Owned by Ingram • PDA model launched in 2010 • Several access models • Available to individual libraries and consortia EBSCO • EBSCO includes former NetLibrary eBooks • Launched in 2011 • 1, 3 or Unlimited Users • Ebooks are purchased after preset number of loans
    4. 4. Publishers: PDA/DDA/UDA models DeGruyter Patron-Driven Acquisitions October 2012 Journal articles, book chapters, ebooks Libraries choose format and collection Elsevier “Evidence Based Selections” eBooks % of collection total list price for deposit amount Gale Usage-Driven Acquisitions December 2013 eBooks Pricing depends on size school. Also have “Academic List” smaller collection Springer does not technically have a PDA model in place currently, although they have offered pilot programs at several universities. Wiley does not have a PDA model in place currently.
    5. 5. Sam Houston State University: PDA/DDA program Ebrary • June 2010— August 2011 • eBook PDA • Purchased immediately upon 1st trigger (No option for short- term loans) • Discontinued due to budget constraints • Overall, most purchased PDA eBooks only used once EBSCO • October 2012—present • Subscription unlimited users • Academic Collection • Affects titles excluded in PDA profile(s) • Also affects which requested eBooks are purchased. Ebrary • October 2012— August 2014 • eBook PDA • SUPO (single-user) • Purchased after 3rd loan • Price limit $300 • ___ % purchased PDA eBooks still only used once. • Approximately 265,000 eBooks in PDA profile EBL • August 2014— present • eBook DDA • Non-Linear Lending model, unlimited concurrent users • Purchase after 4th loan • eBook price limit $300. • Approximately 435,000 eBooks in PDA profile
    6. 6. SHSU Patron-Driven Acquisition eBook Usage 0 335 654 539 53 455 327 374 264 27 221 68 68 68 3 0 100 200 300 400 500 600 700 Ebrary (2011) Ebrary (Oct 2012-Dec 2012) Ebrary (Jan 2013-Dec 2013) Ebrary (Jan 2014 -Aug 2014) EBL (Sept 2014-present) Short Term Loans Ebooks purchased Ebooks purchased, used more than 1x
    7. 7. SHSU Patron-Driven Acquisition Expenditures Ebrary: Fiscal Year 2011 (June 2010-Aug 2011) Short Term Loans Ebooks, purchased $19,727 $16,650 Ebrary: Fiscal Year 2013 (Oct 2012-August 2013) Short Term Loans Ebooks, purchased $21,669 $28,877 Ebrary : Fiscal Year 2014 (Sept 2013-Aug 2014) Short Term Loans Ebooks, purchased $4,855 $868 EBL : Fiscal Year 2015 (Sept 2014-present) Short Term Loans Ebooks, purchased $80,248 $36,337 $50,546 $5,723
    8. 8. Acquisitions Challenges: PDA/DDA programs • De-Duplication • System limitations • Currency of our list of owned/subscribed eBooks • Communication & Training • Staff members not overlaying records with print or eBook orders • Notifying cataloging when a PDA purchase happens • Timeliness regarding removing/adding PDA records • Maintenance • Titles moving in/out without notice • Single User model with multiple user demand • Staff Time Invested
    9. 9. LOOKING BACK Better supporting our distance-education and online courses Greatly reducing the amount of time between a patron-requested resource and giving them access to books (compared to “Request a book for purchase” service on our website, or InterLibrary Loan) Multiple concurrent user access is a better fit for how we use this service. Connecting an eBook with a unique username (randomized) seems to be preventing the same user from triggering an eBook multiple times (unless on purpose) reducing costs to the library Still PDA will likely be one method of acquisition for SHSU, not replacing collection development by librarians
    10. 10. CATALOGING PDA RECORDS An overview of Sam Houston State University’s PDA Record Processing Workflow
    11. 11. Cataloging PDA Records PDA and the Library Catalog – Why integrate records?
    12. 12. PDA and the Library Catalog – Why Integrate Records? Non-Integrated
    13. 13. PDA and the Library Catalog – Why Integrate Records? Integrated
    14. 14. PDA and the Library Catalog – Why Integrate Records? Why not integrate? • Initial processing time requirements • Maintenance commitments • Record quality • Disrupting the database
    15. 15. Cataloging PDA Records - Workflow
    16. 16. Cataloging PDA Records – Stage 1 Analyzing Records • Request sample • Compare records to records currently in your library’s catalog • Outline fields that will require processing
    17. 17. Cataloging PDA Records – Stage 1 Analyzing Records Continued… Sample PDA Record
    18. 18. Cataloging PDA Records – Stage 2 Processing Records • Efficient processing of large groups of records requires batch modifications • Multi-functional MARC processing software is recommended MarcEdit • Metadata editing suite • Developed by Terry Reese • http://marcedit.reeset.net/
    19. 19. Cataloging PDA Records – Stage 2 MarcEdit: Features • MARC Editing • RDA Helper • Delimited Text Translator • Export as Tab Delimited • Harvest OAI Data • XML Translations • Characterset conversion • Z39.50/SRU Client • MARC SQL Explorer • MARCValidator
    20. 20. Cataloging PDA Records – Stage 2 MarcEdit & Regular Expressions Primary RegEx components used in MarcEdit • Character escapes: Backslash character () in a regular expression indicates that the following character is either a special character or should be interpreted literally e.g., d r n • Anchors: Cause a match to succeed based on proximity within the string (beginning/end) e.g., ^$ • Character classes: Matches set of characters specified within brackets e.g., [] [^] • Grouping constructs: Delineate sub expressions of a regular expression and capture substrings of an input string e.g., () • Quantifiers: Specifies number of element instances to be present in the input string for a match to occur e.g., *?+{#} • Substitutions: Regular expression language elements that are supported in replacement patterns Additional information on .NET Framework Regular Expressions: http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/hs600312.aspx
    21. 21. Cataloging PDA Records – Stage 2 Processing Continued: Translating requirements into regular expression commands
    22. 22. Cataloging PDA Records – Stage 2 Processing Continued: Converting individual commands into tasks, and tasks into conglomerated task functions
    23. 23. Cataloging PDA Records – Stage 2 Processing Continued: Translating requirements into regular expression commands • Tag field for PDA resource in loan stage: 899 EBLEBOOKS$bEB$cPDA$dAdded 20140520$fzav • Tag field for PDA resource after a purchase has been triggered: 899 EBLEBOOKS$bEB$cPurchased$dAdded 20140520$ePurchased 20140617$fzav
    24. 24. Cataloging PDA Records – Stage 3 Importing Records Continued: Maintaining separate locations for PDA resources and purchased resources
    25. 25. LOOKING BACK • Research load limits associated with your ILS • Perform small test loads before graduating to larger loads • Create specific item location for PDA records Recommendations
    26. 26. LOOKING AHEAD • Considering 1-2 Usage-Driven Acquisitions programs • Is continued higher use of purchased eBooks likely? • Greater control over permanently owned titles. • Increased interest from faculty & students for streaming media • Streaming Video PDA programs available via Kanopy • Are serials/journals next up for PDA? • Major hesitations due to logistics and custom holdings of print owned material
    27. 27. Q&A plus Group Discussion DISCUSSION • What are you doing in your library? • Positive or Negative experience with PDA/DDA/UDA models thus far? • Suggestions/Advice to those who have not ventured into PDA/DDA yet? • Feedback from patrons/faculty/teachers regarding PDA/DDA/UDA eBooks? • Other areas expanding into PDA --- journals, streaming media, etc.
    28. 28. Resources & Acknowledgements  Slide 2  “Patron Driven Acquisitions” ODLIS http://www.abc-clio.com/ODLIS/odlis_p.aspx  Slide 3  [“EBL logo”]. Image. Retrieved October 10, 2014 via Google Images, Creative Commons Attribution. http://www.ala.org/news/press-releases/2013/04/polanka-and-others-present-and-future-ebooks-new-american-libraries-live  [“ebrary” logo]. Image. Retrieved October 10, 2014 via Google Images, Creative Commons Attribution.  [“MyiLibrary” logo]. Image. Retrieved October 10, 2014 via Google Images, Creative Commons Attribution.  [“EBCSO” logo]. Image. Retrieved October 10, 2014 via Google Images, Creative Commons Attribution.  Slide 11  [Digital Library image ]. Image. Retrieved October 15, 2014 from http://www.digitalbookworld.com  Slide 16  [Man with magnifying glass ]. Image. Retrieved October 15, 2014 from http://www.itpro.uk  Slide 18  Reese, T. (2014, January 1). MarcEdit Development. Retrieved October 16, 2014, from http://marcedit.reeset.net/  Slide 20  .NET Framework Regular Expressions. (2014, January 1). Retrieved October 16, 2014, from http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/hs600312.aspx.  Slide 25  [Advice]. Image. Retrieved September 29, 2014 via Bing Images, Creative Commons Attribution.  Slide 26  [Future Exit]. Image. Retrieved September 29, 2014 via Bing Images, Creative Commons Attribution.  Slide 26  [Q&A 3D image with figure]. Image. Retrieved September 13, 2014 via Bing Images, Creative Commons Attribution.  [question mark 3D image with figure]. Image. Retrieved September 13, 2014 via Bing Images, Creative Commons Attribution.

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