Deviance part 2 hooliganism, drugs and sport and the law

3,272 views
2,903 views

Published on

AQA A2 PE

Published in: Sports
0 Comments
2 Likes
Statistics
Notes
  • Be the first to comment

No Downloads
Views
Total views
3,272
On SlideShare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
163
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
86
Comments
0
Likes
2
Embeds 0
No embeds

No notes for slide

Deviance part 2 hooliganism, drugs and sport and the law

  1. 1. Deviance in Sport– Part 2
  2. 2. Learning Objectives•Be able to give 5 arguments why hooliganism occurs and thecounterarguments for these reasons•Give 5 strategies to control violence by spectators•Give 5 effects of violence on a sport, spectators, players andclubs•Outline the law and spectators, players, club owners andofficials•Explain for an increase in the involvement of the legal systemin sport
  3. 3. Hooliganism - CausesRitualised behaviour –expression of masculinity– a rite of passage……..may be someexplanation but goesbeyond thisA form of tribalbehaviour?Membership granted ifprove yourself. Groupperceive protectingtheir local area/patch……Not always locals,supporters of fans inother sports don’t dothisTension on pitch – violencebetween players – or poorref decision can all triggerpassionate fans………………………may be butdoesn’t affect all fans or inall sportsAn outlet for young workingclass males – feel restrictedby the constraints of anincreasingly ‘safe’ society………counterargument –not all hooligans areworking class, not all youngmen feel need to engage inthis behaviourSome footballgroups infiltrated byextreme politicalgroups…….true of aminority but cannotaccount for allChange in fan base from justworking class to includemiddle class(bourgeoisification) andincreased unemployment,loss of trad W/C jobs,boredom – a reaction to this?…..may be but althoughbalance has changed…allhooligans not working class
  4. 4. Hooliganism - CausesRitualised behaviour –expression of masculinity– a rite of passage……..may be someexplanation but goesbeyond thisA form of tribalbehaviour?Membership granted ifprove yourself. Groupperceive protectingtheir local area/patch……Not alwayslocals, supporters offans in other sportsdon’t do thisTension on pitch – violencebetween players – or poorref decision can all triggerpassionate fans………………………may be butdoesn’t affect all fans or inall sportsAn outlet for young workingclass males – feel restrictedby the constraints of anincreasingly ‘safe’ society………counterargument –not all hooligans areworking class, not all youngmen feel need to engage inthis behaviourSome footballgroups infiltrated byextreme politicalgroups…….true of aminority but cannotaccount for allChange in fan base from justworking class to includemiddle class(bourgeoisification) andincreasedunemployment, loss of tradW/C jobs, boredom – areaction to this?…..may be but althoughbalance has changed…allhooligans not working classClose rivalry between fans –local derbies can inflamefans passion – particularlywhen sensationalised bymedia…….may be but other sportshave rivalries and some ofthese fans sit together toenjoy the matchULTIMATELY……..Impossible to identifyjust one causeSeen as multi-causal –each reason adds toover overallunderstanding
  5. 5. Effectofviolenceonindividuals,sportandwidersociety1. Violence brings a sport in to disrepute2. Damages ability to encourage children, young people and familiesto participate3. Parents will not allow their children to be involved in a sportwhere their well-being will be put at risk4. A similar reaction is going to happen if poor behaviour occurs atlocal matchesEffects: Fan violence leads to poor treatment of legitimate fans andsupporters i.e. held in grounds until home fans gone, herded throughstreets with suspicion and distrust (particularly abroad) Career ending tackles as a result of deliberate fouls Individual players may miss chance for international recognition ifteam restricted from playing in some competitions Huge cost – FA/Club pays some – local police pay rest – tax moneyspent on this instead of other issuesReputation of country damaged – poor behaviour abroad can effectnational morale effect of achieving international success (just aseasily as the lift this can bring)
  6. 6. Strategiestocombathooliganism:Prevention of knownhooligans travelling tomatches – banningorders – having toreport to police stationsduring match timeControl of alcohol – bans ingrounds, on terraces,local pubs shutSegregation of fans –travelling and withingroundsAll-seater stadiums – bettercontrol of movementwithin ground andcontrol of ticket salesImproved levels of policeand stewards (andtraining)CCTV with face-recognitionsoftwareSharing police intelligence/UKofficers travel abroad to shareknowledgeNot allowing players to makegestures to crowd or take anyactionResponding to poor behaviour bybanning or removal fromcompetitions, fines, playingmatches away or behind closeddoorsUse by FA of high profile rolemodels to appeal for bettersupporter behaviour (‘Kick racismout of football’)
  7. 7. Drugs and SportSummary of previous workUnethicalAgainstsportingregulationsDangerousCheatingAgainst thelawRolemodelstake drugsWin-at-all-costsUnbridledambitionDesire toexcelReasonswhy sometake drugsPossiblesolutionsRandomtestingPunishcoachesMiss testsgives banPunishGoverningBodiesUrine andbloodsamplesFail secondtestpermanentban
  8. 8. Drugs and SportThings to rememberGreat care taken toget it right – havebeen sued whenissues – DianeModahl –failed test in94 – proved to beissues with testingprocess – she wasreinstated but neverregained fitnessneeded to be eliteathlete.WADA – World Anti-Doping Agency – setup 1998 to enforceinternational regson dopingBOA and UKsport/NADO –widespreadrandom drugstestingprogrammeWhereabouts rule– provoked angerfrom some – saysbreaks EuropeanPrivacy LawUnder WADArules (Jan 09) – allOlympic athletesare required tostate 3 months inadvance theirlocations for 1hour per day 7days a weekUK Sport fundresearch in tonew techniquesto detect drugsNGBs try toeducate athletesagainst drug useNADO –NationalAnti-DopingAgency
  9. 9. Arguments forand againstdrug testingFor:Remove dangeroussubstancesAllow people to takedrugs in a controlledmannerAllow everyone a levelplaying fieldCreate possibility thatmore records could bebroken – great forspectatorsAgainst:Some people wouldnever be preparedto take drugs andtherefore never alevel playing fieldDangerous sideeffectsIllegal programmeswould still exist andathletes may beforced in to theseCost
  10. 10. Sport andthe Law
  11. 11. Sport Law – the bodyof legislation, case lawand precedence thatapplies to sportSeeing more issues insport that are requiringlegal involvement –violence, illegalbetting, employmentdisputes e.g. BosmanRulingSport would like tocontrol its own issues –be judge and jury – butincreasingly they arehaving to operate withinthe normal legal system– we need to know whySpecialistSportssolicitorsBosman ruling – theruling by the EuropeanCourt of Justice, givinga professional playerthe right to a freetransfer at the end oftheir contractMore media, money andhigh profile of eliteplayers the possibilitythat players are treatedunfairly, incorrectly orillegally will increase
  12. 12. Lawandtheperformer1. They have employment protection (e.g. Bosman ruling)2. Players within the EU have right to work anywhere theywish with EU – restricting number of non-Englandqualified players in premiership could break EuropeanLaw3. Sanctions against those found drug doping – can appealNADO but some then still pursue legal action e.g. DianeModahl, Dwain Chambers4. NGBs have rules against betting on matches a player isinvolved in – can be prosecuted for match fixing5. NGBs and legal authorities divided on how to deal withplayer violence – most handled by NGB – UK CPS hasbeen involved in some incidents – Duncan Fergursonserved 44 days for head-butting another player in 1995.In 2003 – El Hadj Diouf – Liverpool – fined £5000 forspitting (assault) on a Celtic fan during a UEFA match6. Some Civil claims being made – 2008 – rugby playersued for compensation when left with a broken eyesocket after being punched – Hugh court ruling in hisfavour
  13. 13. LawandtheOfficial 1. Officials in sport – particularly matchofficials are open to investigation ifthought to being bribed. And prosecutedif found doing so.2. Referees duty of care. Ref may be liable ifit is thought decisions of a referee alloweda dangerous situation – In 1998 Law Lordsupheld a negligence case against a ref andthe Welsh RFU for not applying the lawsabout non-contested scrums correctly.3. Organisers of sport events have a duty ofcare towards competitors and spectators –to ensure they are not put at risk thoughavoidable or predictable events
  14. 14. Lawandmanagers,agents,directorsandclubowners1. Commercial Law applies to transfers ofplayers and other club dealings – failure tofollow the law on this will lead toprosecutions2. Club Directors and Owners have an obligationto follow all Health and Safety Legislation toprotect spectators –The Hillsborough disaster caused a major rethinkin the way crowds are managed and stadiumdesigned – Taylor report lead to all seaterstadiums, removal of pitch side fencing and morestewards. Also led to changes to sales of alcoholat stadiums, tick controls and turnstiles
  15. 15. LawandtheSpectator 1. Spectators must act within the lawat sports events with a regard totheir own safety and the safety ofothers.2. Invasion of playing surfaces, useof foul language and racist chantscould all be dealt with undervarious public order acts.3. Hooligan behaviour, as definedbefore, clearly breaks the law andwould be dealt with by the courts
  16. 16. 1. Give reasons for spectator violence at professional associationfootball matches (5)2. Define Hooliganism and discuss the reasons it might occur (4)3. What steps have been taken to reduce the incidents ofhooliganism in the Premiership? (3)4. Explain the differences between sport law and national law anddiscuss how this has changed (8)5. Discuss the problem of illegal drug taking. Focus your answer onone specific drug (14 marks)6. Sportsmanship and gamesmanship are two opposites. Explain thedifferences between the two in a game of your choice (6)

×