Your SlideShare is downloading. ×
 Generational Issues and Distance Learning
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in...5
×

Thanks for flagging this SlideShare!

Oops! An error has occurred.

×

Saving this for later?

Get the SlideShare app to save on your phone or tablet. Read anywhere, anytime - even offline.

Text the download link to your phone

Standard text messaging rates apply

Generational Issues and Distance Learning

464
views

Published on

Originally presented with Adobe Connect …

Originally presented with Adobe Connect






Published in: Technology, Education

0 Comments
0 Likes
Statistics
Notes
  • Be the first to comment

  • Be the first to like this

No Downloads
Views
Total Views
464
On Slideshare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
0
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
0
Comments
0
Likes
0
Embeds 0
No embeds

Report content
Flagged as inappropriate Flag as inappropriate
Flag as inappropriate

Select your reason for flagging this presentation as inappropriate.

Cancel
No notes for slide
  • So we’re going to look at the terms “digital natives” and “digital immigrants”. These terms were coined by Mark Prensky, an education scholar and the author of “Digital Game-Based Education”
  • As an introduction to the differences in learning styles between digital immigrants and natives, I would like to briefly discuss the video activity that I sent you earlier this week. You watched the opening credits of a sitcom from the 1970s, MASH and from the contemporary sitcom, 30 Rock. What differences did you notice? (You speak or use the chat bar)
  • The differences between the two TV shows illustrate, in some ways, the differences between the way digital immigrants and digital natives learn. You’ll see some of these differences in the comparison charts. The first difference is pacing. Digital natives have been moving at a quicker pace their whole lives. They get bored more easily than past generations
  • Digital immigrants focus on one thing at a time; digital natives multitask—they text message while doing homework and listening to music. Digital immigrants are accustomed to learning from print text; natives prefer more visual stimulation (as exemplified by the 30 Rock credits), with graphics and multimedia accompanying printed information. Immigrants are used to learning individually, Natives enjoy cooperative learning (they are used to being connected at all times with their peers)
  • Immigrants can learn seriously; natives enjoy games and constant rewards (even if the rewards are a new text message or Facebook post, those things give them constant gratification—a)
  • Next we are going to look at some articles that look into recent teenage use of technology. This will give us a better picture of the young person who will be walking into your classroom. Right click on the Scavenger Hunt hyperlink and follow the instructions.
  • Next we are going to look at some articles that look into recent teenage use of technology. This will give us a better picture of the young person who will be walking into your classroom. Right click on the Scavenger Hunt hyperlink and follow the instructions.
  • Next we are going to look at some articles that look into recent teenage use of technology. This will give us a better picture of the young person who will be walking into your classroom. Right click on the Scavenger Hunt hyperlink and follow the instructions.
  • Next we are going to look at some articles that look into recent teenage use of technology. This will give us a better picture of the young person who will be walking into your classroom. Right click on the Scavenger Hunt hyperlink and follow the instructions.
  • Transcript

    • 1. Generational Differences and Distance Learning
    • 2.
      • Why study generational differences ?
    • 3.
      • 1. Diversity
      • Di verse populations of students are entering the college classroom
      • 2. Faculty-Student Age Divide
      • Average faculty age is over 50; their learning experiences were vastly different from the learning experiences of many students
    • 4.
      • 3. Educational
      • All students learn more effectively when taught in accordance with their preferred learning styles
    • 5. Objectives
      • Define the terms “digital native” and “digital immigrant” (Prensky, 2003)
      • Describe 4-5 differences between these two groups when comparing learning styles
    • 6. Objectives (cont’d)
      • List 3-4 different teaching methods that are effective for teaching digital natives
    • 7.
      • Digital Natives
      • vs.
      • Digital Immigrants
      • (Prensky, 2003)
    • 8. Digital Natives
      • The first generation to grow up with the technology of computers, the Internet, cell phones, and MP3 players
        • “ Native speakers ” of the “language” of these devices
        • Born after 1981
        • a/k/a “ The Net Generation ” or “ Millennials ”
    • 9. Digital Immigrants
      • Those of us who were not born into the digital age, but may have adopted many of the new technologies
        • Retain, to some degree, their “accent” from the past
        • e.g. print out information, prefer phone to text messaging
        • Born before 1981 (includes Gen Xers & Baby Boomers)
    • 10.
      • Poll
      • Are you a digital native (born 1981 2010) or a digital immigrant (born before 1981)?
    • 11.
      • Digital Immigrants vs. Digital Natives: Learning Styles
    • 12. IMMIGRANTS NATIVES
      • Slow
      • Step-by-Step ( directions and manuals )
      • Fast
      • Trial & error ( website, I-Phone )
    • 13. IMMIGRANTS NATIVES
      • One thing at a time
      • Print text
      • Individually
      • Multitasking
      • Graphics
      • Cooperative learning (crave being connected)
    • 14. IMMIGRANTS NATIVES
      • Seriously
      • Games, rewards
    • 15.
      • Learning
      • About Digital Natives:
      • Mini-Scavenger Hunt
      • Last names: A-D; Do 1
      • E-H; Do 2
      • I-Z; Do 3
    • 16.
      • 1.) Why do teens play games? How can game-playing increase civic engagement among young people? 
      • OR
      • Share your thoughts on the article
    • 17.
      • 2.) About how many texts do teens send on average, for every hour they are awake?  Why do you think teens send more texts than adults?
      • OR
      • Share your thoughts on the article
    • 18.
      • 3.) Why is “digital grounding” so effective with teens? OR
      • Share your thoughts on the article
    • 19. Tips for teaching Digital Natives
      • Use experiential activities
        • Simulations, games
        • Videotaped scenarios
      • Use interactive activities
        • Discussion forums
        • Blogs, Wikis
        • Social Networking (cont’d)
    • 20. Tips for teaching Digital Natives
      • Incorporate graphics and multimedia into presentations
      • Integrate new technologies as much as possible
    • 21.
      • Tips for Teaching Digital Natives
      • Access the “Teaching Generations” website, and go to the page titled
      • Tips for Teaching Digital Natives
    • 22.
      • Thank you for your participation!