Being A Change Manager Owen Jacob
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Being A Change Manager Owen Jacob

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Being A Change Manager Owen Jacob Being A Change Manager Owen Jacob Presentation Transcript

  • Being an effective change manager – tips, tools & tactics Diploma in the Management of Modern Public Service Delivery IPA 22 January 2009 Owen Jacob Dept of the Taoiseach
  • My background
    • Owen Jacob
    • TCD & IPA
    • Revenue Commissioners
      • ICT, strategy, planning, HR
      • International consultancy
      • Customer service policy
      • M odernisation & change management projects
    • Dept of the Taoiseach
      • Organisational Review Programme
  • Case study 1 Restructuring the Revenue
  • Revenue’s structure
    • Inherited British Inland Revenue, Customs &Excise structure
    • Evolved piecemeal over 75 years
    • No over-riding design model
    • Ad-hoc structure
    • Mixture of tax type & function
    • Increasingly difficult to manage
  • The world ‘outside’ is changing fast…
    • An organisation that doesn’t change at the same speed as its environment dies
  • What the boss wants…
    • “ When I have a problem I want to see the whites of one pair of eyes, not twenty pairs of heels”
  • Structure v. Strategy mismatch
    • Structure
      • Focus on the tax
      • Focus on the function
    • Strategy
      • Deliver excellent customer service
      • Tackle the non-compliant
      • = Focus on the customer
  • Cracks in the structure…
    • Did not support overall view of customer.
    • Did not foster sharing of
      • Information – Knowledge – Experience
    • Resources divided by tax/function – not matched to risk
    • Unclear lines of responsibility and accountability.
    • Not in line with international best practice.
  • Review team
    • Small, highly motivated, independent, well resourced team
    • Empowered by the Board
    • Thought outside the box
    • Traveled the world looking for best practice
    • Made radical recommendations
  • Discussing the undiscussable
    • Undermining complacency
    • Retaining trust
    • Using credible examples
    • Ownership within the organisation –
    • by Revenue, for Revenue
    • Progress in small steps
  • The organisational iceberg - 1 Overt organisation Structure, technology, objectives, operating systems etc Publicly visible, rational
  • The organisational iceberg - 2 Overt organisation Structure, technology, objectives, operating systems etc Covert organisation Power, influence, ambitions, loyalties, empires, fears, inflexibility etc Hidden, emotional, may not be rational Publicly visible, rational
  • The classic crisis
    • Public Accounts Committee inquiry into DIRT tax
    • Tribunals of Inquiry into
      • Big business
      • Wealthy businessmen
      • Top politicians
      • Property sector
    • … laid bare serious tax non-compliance
  • Organisational restructuring…
    • It’s like changing the wiring while keeping the lights on
  • Path to success
    • Crisis
    • Quality of analysis & blueprint
    • Leadership
    • Four Ps
      • Patience
      • Politics
      • Pragmatism
      • Process
    • Examples of best practice & successful restructuring from other Revenues
  • Benefits of new structure?
    • Structure = strategy
    • Integrated approach to customer
    • Clear accountability & responsibility – no hiding place
    • Coherent, sensible structure
    • Competition between regions
    • Freedom to deploy staff where needed
    • Information sharing
  • Case study 2 Modernising a tax process
  • Gift & Inheritance T ax (CAT)
    • CAT administered separately from other taxes
    • Old fashioned approach
    • Factors driving change
      • Case processing too slow
      • New top management
      • Decentralisation of CAT
      • Online filing via ROS
  • How?
    • Full time project team
    • ‘ Outsider ’ to manage project
    • Supported by ‘ insider ’ expert s
    • Analysis
      • Work flow processes
      • Forms
      • Information technology
      • Legislation
    • Consultation
    • Scoping Document = recommendations
  • Internal consultation
    • Informal with key experienced staff especially at front line
    • Steering Group
    • Seminar s
      • Presentations by top management
      • Workshops
      • Feedback
      • Follow-up
    • Shared understanding & commitment
  • External consultation
    • Law Society (solicitors)
    • Institute of Taxation (tax accountants)
    • Roadshow
      • Be honest
      • Sell benefits… get out there!
  • How did we do?
    • Successfully delivered
    • 6 week form turnaround time down to 1-5 days
    • Team working, BPR, real self-assessment, new IT, new forms & guidelines, online filing all a success
    • Staff pleased with change
    • Middle management now convinced
    • Customers delighted
  • Case study 3 ICT enabling transformational customer service
  • PAYE problems – before… after
    • Too much paper… paper eliminated
    • Correspondence channel too time consuming… iC makes it very fast
    • Correspondence backlogs… iC helped managers & case workers reduce backlog to acceptable levels
    • Inefficient phone systems… major revamp of telephony
    • Poor customer service… won national & EU customer service awards
    • Staff frustrated… staff delighted
  • Find best practice
    • Visited & studied other “best of breed” organisations
    • Public & private sector
    • Got industry analyst advice
    • Consulted best ICT brains in civil service
    • Asked ourselves what would ‘perfect’ customer service be? …& worked back from that to what was possible
  • ICT… the key enabler
    • Harness ICT talent
    • Be creative
    • Look at service from customer’s point of view
    • Small business/ICT project team
      • Ambitious, pragmatic, can-do attitude
      • Quick decision making & support from the top
      • Excellent personal relations
      • Utilised state-of-the-market ICT technology
  • The ICT used
    • VoIP telephone system
      • Call treatment, voice recognition (incl. PPSN validation), automatic call routing, self service, screen pop enabler
    • Web self service
      • Most popular self service channel (best for complex transactions)
    • SMS text
      • Hasn’t caught on for self service… yet
    • Integrated Contacts system (iC)
      • No paper, instant on-screen retrieval of post, automatic statistics, faster processing, all contacts (incl. email & phone) included, screen pop
  • Lessons?
    • Learn from best practice elsewhere
    • See everything through customer’s eyes
    • Aim for an idealised service
    • Make use of serious ICT talent
    • Be very tough with ICT contractors
    • Test ICT applications exhaustively
    • Have fallback in place in case ICT fails
    • Sell benefits to ICT users
    • Train & support ICT users carefully
  • Conclusions…
  • How people react - 1 20% 60% 20%
  • How people react - 2 20% 60% 20% Always resist change Need to be convinced & wait to see which way wind is blowing Actively embrace change
  • How people react - 3 20% 60% 20% Always resist change Need to be convinced & wait to see which way wind is blowing Actively embrace change Harness them & temper their expectations & must include leadership
  • How people react - 4 20% 60% 20% Always resist change Need to be convinced & wait to see which way wind is blowing Actively embrace change Main focus of communication & must be won over Harness them & temper their expectations & must include leadership
  • How people react - 5 20% 60% 20% Always resist change Need to be convinced & wait to see which way wind is blowing Actively embrace change Ignore Main focus of communication & must be won over Harness them & temper their expectations & must include leadership
  • Kotter’s 8 steps to change (HBR March/April 1995)
    • Establish a sense of urgency
    • Form a guiding coalition
    • Create a vision
    • Communicate the vision
    • Empower others to act on the vision
    • Plan for & create short term wins
    • Consolidate improvements
    • Institutionalise new approaches
  • My top 10 tips
    • Top notch project team
    • High quality analysis
    • Clear vision
    • Inspired leadership (plus a crisis)
    • Be political
    • Communicate
    • Empower change champions
    • Reward supporters
    • Be pragmatic & get stuck in
    • Get quick wins
  • Finally
    • Change is not easy – most people & organisations resist change
    • So…
      • Get the analysis & vision right
      • Communicate continuously
      • But, do not crucify yourself on the cross of perfection
      • Learn by doing – start small & build it up
      • Be brave, lead from the front
  • Thank you