Session 29 Tomas Klemets

556 views
455 views

Published on

A presentation of the CrewAlert tool for enhanched fatigue risk management in airline operation.

Published in: Health & Medicine, Business
0 Comments
0 Likes
Statistics
Notes
  • Be the first to comment

  • Be the first to like this

No Downloads
Views
Total views
556
On SlideShare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
2
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
13
Comments
0
Likes
0
Embeds 0
No embeds

No notes for slide
  • Summary: We now have a human touch; the optimizer is aware of human physiology. The process runs well The effect to date is limited Again: we do not have a full FRMS in place BUT: we control a safety KPI through the process, we can quantify changes, and we are building experience for levaraging this further down the line. Thank you.
  • Session 29 Tomas Klemets

    1. 1. CrewAlert – management of crew fatigue in airline operation Transportforum, Linköping, Januari 2012 Tomas Klemets, Head of Scheduling Safety, Jeppesen Systems
    2. 2. IX812, Mangalore 22 May 2010… Mangalore-Dubai-Mangalore 21:35-06:30 Air India Express
    3. 3. IX812, Mangalore 22 May 2010… Mangalore-Dubai-Mangalore 21:35-06:30 Air India Express
    4. 4. IX812, Mangalore 22 May 2010… Mangalore-Dubai-Mangalore 21:35-06:30 Air India Express
    5. 5. Why fatigue matters… <ul><li>An estimated 70% of fatal accidents are related to human error </li></ul><ul><li>Fatigue is estimated to contribute to 15-20% of overall accident rate in aviation. </li></ul><ul><li>1993 Kalitta International, DC-8-61F at Guantanamo Bay, Cuba </li></ul><ul><li>1997 Korean Air, 747-300 at Guam </li></ul><ul><li>1999 American Airlines, MD-82 at Little Rock, AR </li></ul><ul><li>2004 MK Airlines, 747-200F at Halifax, Nova Scotia </li></ul><ul><li>2004 Corporate Airlines, BAE Jetstream31 at Kirksville, USA </li></ul><ul><li>2004 Med Air, Learjet35A at San Bernadino, CA </li></ul><ul><li>2005 Loganair, B-N Islander at Machrihanish, UK </li></ul><ul><li>2006, 27th Aug, Comair, CRJ100 at Lexington, KY </li></ul><ul><li>2007, 25th June, Cathay Pacific 747F at Stockholm, Sweden </li></ul><ul><li>2007, 28th Oct, JetX, 737-800TF-JXF Keflavik airport, Iceland… </li></ul><ul><li>… Buffalo, Mangalore, AF447? … </li></ul>
    6. 6. Content <ul><li>Background </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Crew management </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Flight and Duty Time Limits (FTLs) </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Fatigue Risk Management Systems (FRMSs) </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Fatigue models </li></ul><ul><li>CrewAlert </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Data collection/ fatigue reporting </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Next generation rules? </li></ul>
    7. 7. Background
    8. 8. Jeppesen and Jeppesen Crew Solutions <ul><li>3,000 employees </li></ul><ul><li>Denver, Frankfurt, Gothenburg, Montreal, Singapore, New York, Brisbane... </li></ul><ul><li>Navigation, Flight planning, </li></ul><ul><li>Crew Solutions: 500 people focused entirely on crew management. </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Affecting some 250,000 crew daily . </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Mostly crew planning, but also day-of-ops solutions </li></ul></ul>
    9. 9. Where should fatigue be managed? Crew management processes * Today Correct data Salary events Recruit? Transition training? Base size? Qualification structure in cabin? Crew negotiations? Leave Promote instructors? Enough instructors? Leave Leave of absence? Move crew btw bases? Adjust the schedule? Productivity Real costs Robustness Quality of life Use reserves Trip trades Maintain productivity Maintain sby levels Crew quality Long term manpower Mid term manpower Planning Maintain planning DEC JAN FEB ...MAY … JAN‘13 * Passenger focus Legality / feasibility Secure revenue Day of operation Today JAN Follow-up
    10. 10. Answer: Where it’s introduced. Crew management processes * Today Long term manpower Mid term manpower Planning Maintain planning Follow-up Manpower Planning Applications: Crew Rostering Crew Pairing Crew Rostering Crew Pairing Day of operation Today Crew Tracking Time table planning * The flight ”context”: Surrounding activities/flights on the roster, Individual history and circumstances Maintain what has been planned... DEC JAN FEB ...MAY … JAN‘13 JAN Station, Departure time, Equipment, Augmentation, Choice of hotel, Deadheading, ...
    11. 11. Crew working time rules and planning objectives Maximum monthly block time Maximum monthly duty time Maximum weekly duty time Maximum weekly block time Minimum days off per month Maximum consecutive working days Minimum rest after duty Maximum duty time Maximum duty time, f(start time, sectors) Maximum block time in duty, f(start time, sectors) Robustness Quality Productivity Minimize costs
    12. 12. Fatigue/Alertness Models Fatigue Models represent the most practical, and precise, method of applying current fatigue/sleep science to crew scheduling: Time S represent the homeostatic effect of time awake S’ represents the recovery effect associated with sleep C represents the effect of the ~24hr circadian rhythms S + C (+ other factors and processes) are summed to predict alertness as a function of prior work and sleep history
    13. 13. A small real-world example of FTL misalignment <ul><li>Rules are blunt instruments! </li></ul><ul><li>Good at limiting work – not at limiting fatigue. </li></ul>12h rest before this 2-pilot flight is a requirement in the FTLs A later deadhead safeguarding night rest is better for safety. And the pilots. And efficiency.
    14. 14. Another, less obvious, example 1402 Savings opportunity? Spending opportunity? Round the world tour. Kuala Lumpur – Hong Kong – Anchorage –Chicago – Dallas – Bruessels – Sharjah – Kuala Lumpur
    15. 15. CrewAlert
    16. 16. Feeding in schedule and sleep <ul><li>Automatic load, or manual entry, of load work schedule </li></ul>
    17. 17. Feeding in schedule and sleep <ul><li>Automatic load, or manual entry, of load work schedule </li></ul><ul><li>Override sleep predictions with actual sleep patterns </li></ul>
    18. 18. Personal settings <ul><li>Automatic load, or manual entry, of load work schedule </li></ul><ul><li>Override sleep predictions with actual sleep patterns </li></ul><ul><li>Customize to you personally </li></ul>
    19. 19. Collecting data <ul><li>Automatic load, or manual entry, of load work schedule </li></ul><ul><li>Override sleep predictions with actual sleep patterns </li></ul><ul><li>Customize to you personally </li></ul><ul><li>Collection of operational data – to help science forward or to follow up on a part of the operation </li></ul>
    20. 20. Issuing a fatigue report <ul><li>Automatic load, or manual entry, of load work schedule </li></ul><ul><li>Override sleep predictions with actual sleep patterns </li></ul><ul><li>Customize to you personally </li></ul><ul><li>Collection of operational data – to help science forward or to follow up on a part of the operation </li></ul><ul><li>Easy submission of fatigue reports along ICAO guide lines </li></ul>
    21. 21. Context sensitive mitigation advice (future)
    22. 22. Next generation rules and scheduling
    23. 23. Summary <ul><li>The Finnair crew scheduling process now has a ”human touch” </li></ul><ul><li>The process runs well </li></ul><ul><li>The effect to date, within all existing constraints, is limited </li></ul><ul><li>Finnair does not have a full FRMS in place, but: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Controls a safety KPI </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Can quantify changes </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Builds experience for the future </li></ul></ul>Slide from International Air Safety Seminar 2011, Singapore, November 2011
    24. 24. <ul><li>2002- When to ascend? </li></ul>2020- When not to ascend?
    25. 25. Questions [email_address] www.jeppesen.com/frm

    ×