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Knowledgemnagement
Knowledgemnagement
Knowledgemnagement
Knowledgemnagement
Knowledgemnagement
Knowledgemnagement
Knowledgemnagement
Knowledgemnagement
Knowledgemnagement
Knowledgemnagement
Knowledgemnagement
Knowledgemnagement
Knowledgemnagement
Knowledgemnagement
Knowledgemnagement
Knowledgemnagement
Knowledgemnagement
Knowledgemnagement
Knowledgemnagement
Knowledgemnagement
Knowledgemnagement
Knowledgemnagement
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Knowledgemnagement

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  • Transcript

    • 1. De-Mystifying Knowledge Management & the Practices
    • 2. What Is Knowledge Data A Record of a Change of State “ 1840KL0617” “ Information “ The flight from Amman leaves at 18:40 Data organized with a purpose. A message Knowledge “ that’s not a good flight; Often busy and delayed” Literally… what people know
    • 3. What Is Knowledge
      • Knowledge is What People Know
      • Knowledge is complex and contextual, created as part of an interactive process, essentially a human attribute, value laden and connected to Action
    • 4.
      • We create knowledge:
        • When faced with a problem & receptive
        • By asking questions (of ourselves and others)
        • By discovering connections among things
        • By sharing ideas & experiences
        • By working together & interacting
        • By thinking…
          • Rationally (deductive process)
          • Intuitively (inductive process)
      Getting Knowledge
    • 5. Where Knowledge is Stored
      • PEOPLE
      • Publications
      • Documentation
      • Information systems
      • Communications infrastructure
      • Information management &
      • collaborative work tools
      • Learning opportunities
    • 6. What is Knowledge Management
      • Knowledge Management is a collection of activities, processes and policies that help organizations apply knowledge to improve effectiveness, innovation and quality.
      • The Purpose of KM is to turn personal knowledge into corporate knowledge and corporate knowledge into personal knowledge.
    • 7. Knowledge Management
      • Is not an organizational goal in itself
      • Is a means to achieving
        • Organizational effectiveness and efficiency
        • Development results
      • Is knowledge sharing
        • Strategic, systematic & process oriented
      • Requires change management
        • Individual attitudes and work habits
        • Team building
        • Organizational culture
    • 8. KM Principles Knowledge management OR knowledge sharing is about PEOPLE interactions facilitated by technology
    • 9. Best Knowledge Transfer Technology
        • Face-to-Face Interaction
        • Not always possible but everything else aspires to it
      Best Knowledge Repository
        • A Community or Group of people is the best repository of knowledge
      Collection and codification are still important!
    • 10. Levels of Connection
      • UNDP internal
        • Local, regional, global
      • UNCT
        • Thematic
        • Priority in context of UN reform
      • External
        • Development partners
        • Local capacity building
        • South-south cooperation
    • 11. Why KM & Practices for UNDP?
      • For The Organization:
        • Promotes UNDP’s capacity to become a knowledge organization by drawing on local, regional and global expertise and promoting the exchange of more nuanced information. Enhances the delivery, relevance and effectiveness of our work and advisory services .
      • For the thematic community:
        • Allows for the development a common language & understanding of thematic issues.
      • For the individual:
        • Help staff to do their jobs , builds bonds with peers, keep up to date
    • 12. What is Practice Architecture?
      • A set up that allows us to become a
      • “ Global Team”, and to make better
      • use of the existing Knowledge within
      • the organization.
      “The way UNDP will become a Global Team is by establishing itself as a Knowledge Organization built on a Practice Structure. Practices will not change our fundamental organization structure of Country Office and headquarters bureaus, but they will require all of us to have an internal matrix: we must both fulfill our personal and unit responsibilities but also contribute to UNDP's work around the globe through Practices." MMB
    • 13. The 5 (6) UNDP Practices
      • Democratic Governance
      • Poverty Reduction
      • Crisis Prevention and Recovery
      • Energy and Environment
      • HIV/AIDS
      • Management
      • Crosscutting Areas : Gender, ICTD, CD
    • 14. Practice support staff Dedicated Practice staff Practi - tioners Practices support CO - level service delivery Practice leadership Practice support staff Select staff in HQ the SURFs support wide range of practice activities Practice support staff Select staff in HQ & the SURFs who support wide range of practice activities Practitioners • RRs, DRRs , ARR and programme officers in the field or currently posted in HQ. They contribute with knowledge (both substantive and process know inputs to practice priorities, and mutual support Practitioners • RRs, DRRs , ARR and programme officers in the field or currently posted in HQ. They contribute with knowledge (both substantive and process know-how) inputs to practice priorities, and mutual support  BDP, BCPR staff who commit all their time to work in practices The Practice Architecture Dedicated practice staff Dedicated practice staff Practice leadership Practice Leader and ASG champion govern the practice Practice leadership Practice Leader and ASG champion govern the practice
    • 15. What is a UNDP Practice?
      • Practices bring people from different regions, across all Bureaux and offices together into voluntary, flexible communities, based on common professional interest, so that they can share and learn from each other's knowledge and experience and develop new ideas. They include a wide range of organizational functions such as knowledge management, advocacy, partnership building, and professional development.
      • A UNDP Practice has the following key elements:
        • It is flexible
        • It is global
        • It has a flat framework
    • 16. Some Practice Tools
      • Competency Mapping (PEM & MSI)
      • Practice Workspace
      • Practice Notes and Compiled Lessons
      • Practice Meetings
      • Knowledge Bases
      • Quality Products, Toolkits & Publications
      • And…
    • 17. The Community of Practice (COP)
      • A community of practice is a group of people within or outside of an organization having common professional interests, concerns and knowledge needs, who bond together to build a common identity as a community.
    • 18. Why COPs?
      • They spread good ideas and produce innovation.
      • They solve problems, save avoidable mistakes, and increase individual competence.
      • They break down organizational silos and improve the quality of work life.
      • They can retain knowledge in “living ways”, unlike a database or manual
    • 19. UNDP’s COPs – How do they work?
      • Knowledge communities are organized around 6 practices:
      • Democratic Governance
      • Poverty Reduction
      • Crisis Prevention and Recovery
      • Energy and Environment
      • HIV / AIDS
      • Management Practice Network
      • Additional communities
      • supported by knowledge networks:
      • Millennium Development Goals
      • National Human Development Reports
      • Gender
      • Micro-finance
      • ICT for Development
      • Sub-practice Networks
      • Regional Networks
      219 31 0% 10% 20% 30% 40% 50% 60% 70% 80% 90% 100% UNDP Visible Lyris Groups Total: 262 12 Supported Global Networks Total BDP: 16% Other: 84%
    • 20. Number of Members on SURFs CoPs & Networks Total subscriptions to the SURF & global knowledge networks* 0 261 846 1735 1923 2346 2550 4482 6259 8741 12105 0 2000 4000 6000 8000 10000 12000 14000 Jan- 99 Jul- 99 Jan- 00 Jul- 00 Jan- 01 Jul- 01 Jan- 02 Jul- 02 Jan- 03 Jul- 03 Jan- 04 *Total subscriptions. By Jan '04 5,400 persons (incl. 4,600 UNDP staff) subscribed to one or more networks
    • 21. “ QUERY: Selection of Gender Equity Goals for Poverty Reduction Strategy? ”
      • “ Consider:
      • land tenure and ownership
      • access to credit services
      • access to health services”
      • “ Consider:
      • education”
      • “ Consider:
      • salary gaps”
      • “ Consider:
      • proportion of women in technical positions
      • proportion of administrative and managerial positions held by women
      • percentage of parliamentarians and ministers who are women
      • trade union membership by women
      • number of social and professional organizations headed by women
      • level of gender disaggregation of public data and information. ”
      • “ Consider:
      • publication of gender disaggregated data on poverty significant sectors
      • public spending on social risk mitigation and vulnerability reduction programmes”
      “ CONSOLIDATED REPLY ” What are the essential ingredients?- UNDP’s COP – How do they work?
    • 22. Knowledge Sharing Requires a Culture Shift

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