Your SlideShare is downloading. ×
Super's Theory and My Career Development
Super's Theory and My Career Development
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in...5
×

Thanks for flagging this SlideShare!

Oops! An error has occurred.

×
Saving this for later? Get the SlideShare app to save on your phone or tablet. Read anywhere, anytime – even offline.
Text the download link to your phone
Standard text messaging rates apply

Super's Theory and My Career Development

7,429

Published on

This is a paper that I wrote recently for the Career Development Facilitator (CDF) Training that I am taking with the Center on Education and Work at UW-Madison

This is a paper that I wrote recently for the Career Development Facilitator (CDF) Training that I am taking with the Center on Education and Work at UW-Madison

Published in: Career, Education, Technology
1 Comment
1 Like
Statistics
Notes
No Downloads
Views
Total Views
7,429
On Slideshare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
1
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
76
Comments
1
Likes
1
Embeds 0
No embeds

Report content
Flagged as inappropriate Flag as inappropriate
Flag as inappropriate

Select your reason for flagging this presentation as inappropriate.

Cancel
No notes for slide

Transcript

  • 1. Super’s  Theory  and  My  Career  Development       There  are  several  elements  of  Super’s  Development  theory  that  shed  light  on  my  personal  career  development.    For  one  thing,  Super  emphasizes  the  importance  of  self-­‐concept,  i.e.  “the  picture  we  have  of  who  we  are,”  and  how  that  picture  influences  our  career  choices  over  the  lifespan.    Ideally,  we  are  able  to  implement  our  self-­‐concept  in  our  career  roles.     In  my  case,  my  self-­‐concept  was  first  formulated  while  growing  up  as  an  only  child  and  flourished  once  I  moved  away  from  home  and  began  my  adult  life.    All  throughout  childhood  and  adolescence,  I  viewed  myself  as  an  intelligent,  outgoing  individual  –  I  did  well  in  school,  and  my  parents  encouraged  me  to  devote  time  to  studying.    I  continue  to  view  myself  that  way  today.    I  was  in  numerous  gifted  programs  as  a  student,  did  well  in  most  academic  subjects,  and  participated  in  activities  outside  of  school  –  dance,  softball,  and  choir  to  name  a  few.       I  did  not  initially  see  myself  as  a  creative  person  until  I  received  the  award  for  “Most  Creative”  in  my  second  grade  class  because  I  had  always  associated  creativity  with  being  artistic  –  i.e.  being  good  at  arts  and  crafts  or  drawing  (which  I  was  not  very  good  at).    Winning  that  award  really  helped  me  to  embrace  my  natural  creativity  –  since  that  point  I  have  also  considered  creativity  as  a  key  part  of  my  self-­‐concept.   While  I  had  a  very  positive  childhood,  two  things  were  missing  which  prevented  me  from  developing  my  self-­‐concept  further  until  I  went  to  college  and  started  spending  more  time  away  from  my  parents.    As  mentioned  in  the  review  of  Super’s  theory  for  this  course,  “the  formation  of  self-­‐concept  begins  when  children  distinguish  that  they  are  separate  from  their  parents  and  other  people/objectives  in  their  lives.”    In  my  case,  I  didn’t  really  see  myself  as  separate  from  my  parents  until  there  were  literally  several  hours  driving  distance  between  us.       Growing  up  in  a  fairly  sheltered  existence  with  no  younger  siblings,  I  didn’t  have  the  opportunity  to  serve  as  a  leader  or  role  model  until  college.    Living  as  a  senior  member  of  my  sorority  in  the  chapter  house,  I  was  able  to  mentor  some  younger  members  and  motivate  the  chapter  to  have  better  wellness  habits  as  our  Personal  Development  Coordinator.    In  doing  so,  I  began  to  realize  my  potential  to  motivate  and  inspire  others  –  an  element  of  my  self-­‐concept  that  is  now  central  to  my  career  goals.    Later  on,  after  I  initially  “failed”  at  my  first  job  out  of  college  as  a  market  researcher,  I  realized  the  potential  and  importance  of  those  collegiate  experiences  more  consciously  and  decided  to  attend  graduate  school  to  become  a  Higher  Education  and  Student  Affairs  professional.   Since  that  point,  my  key  purpose  in  life  has  been  to  motivate  and  inspire  people  to  self-­‐actualize  (i.e.  fully  realize  their  self-­‐concept),  discover  their  calling(s),  and  share  their  unique  gifts  with  the  world.    According  to  Super’s  theory,  the  extent  to  which  I  am  able  to  realize  these  various  aspects  of  my  self-­‐concept  in  my  career  roles,  the  more  satisfaction  I  will  gain  in  life.      In  other  words,  if  I  can  help  people  self-­‐actualize  in  a  creative  way  using  my  intelligent  and  social  qualities;  there  is  a  good  chance  that  I  will  be  pleased  with  my  career  life.           1  
  • 2. In  the  four  years  since  I  graduated  from  my  master’s  program  and  started  working  full-­‐time  as  a  Retention  and  Matriculation  Advisor,  my  self-­‐concept  has  solidified  and  become  more  stable.    I  still  see  myself  as  outgoing  and  intelligent,  and  I  continue  to  see  my  creativity  and  motivational/inspirational  qualities  as  key  elements  of  my  personality.      For  the  most  part,  I  have  achieved  much  of  the  satisfaction  and  realization  of  my  self-­‐concept  in  career  that  Super  refers  to.   Still,  recently  I’ve  observed  my  self-­‐concept  starting  to  grow  and  evolve  further  now  that  I’ve  broken  up  with  my  boyfriend  and  started  to  examine  who  I  am  as  a  single  woman  on  my  own.    Going  to  college  helped  me  to  separate  from  my  parents,  but  I  quickly  got  into  a  long-­‐term  romantic  relationship  and  haven’t  really  been  out  of  one  for  long  since  that  time.    Now  that  I  am  taking  the  time  to  truly  be  alone,  I’m  noticing  other  elements  of  my  self-­‐concept  emerging.    For  one  thing,  I’ve  started  to  witness  a  more  introspective,  reflective  part  of  me  that  I’d  like  to  incorporate  more  consciously  in  the  next  phase  of  my  life  –  perhaps  by  writing  professionally  or  cultivating  a  serious  meditation  practice.       Another  way  that  Super’s  developmental  theory  has  affected  my  view  of  my  career  development  is  via  his  discussion  of  the  various  life  roles  that  people  play  in  a  lifetime  and  how  our  emphasis  on  those  various  roles  at  any  given  time  make  up  our  career  and  influence  the  choices  that  we  make.       While  I  was  most  recently  spending  a  lot  of  time  dividing  my  energy  between  Worker,  Partner  to  my  ex-­‐boyfriend,  (Doctoral)  Student,  and  Homemaker  /  Caretaker  to  his  cat,  I  am  now  focused  most  intensely  on  being  a  Worker  and  a  Leisurite  –  to  the  extent  that  I  am  started  to  downshift  my  role  as  (Doctoral)  Student  and  am  seriously  considering  giving  up  that  role  for  this  life  phase.       I’m  on  not  crazy  about  the  word  “Leisurite,”  but  basically  I  am  focused  on  activities  outside  of  work  such  as  yoga,  Biodanza,  dance  class,  choir(s),  and  meditation  that  bring  me  joy,  wellbeing,  and  personal  growth.      In  doing  so,  I’m  hoping  to  clarify  my  values  and  my  self-­‐concept  further  so  that  I  can  choose  a  mate  and  career  pursuits  that  fit  better  together  with  the  things  that  I  like  to  do.       In  addition  to  my  present  life  roles,  I  am  also  incorporating  future  visioning  of  life  roles  into  my  career  planning.      I  enjoy  much  of  my  work  as  a  Retention  and  Matriculation  Advisor  at  USF  and  my  life  feels  pretty  balanced  right  now  –  yet  I  find  myself  exploring  how  I  might  continue  to  achieve  my  life  purpose  of  helping  people  self-­‐actualize  when  I  attempt  to  add  partner  and  parent  into  my  life  roles  in  the  future.    Ideally,  I  would  like  to  take  on  a  part-­‐time  role  as  life  coach  or  writer  so  that  I  can  quit  the  full-­‐time  work  that  I  do  now  as  an  advisor  for  the  time  being  and  focus  on  my  partner  and  parenting  roles  more  intensely.       Overall,  Super’s  developmental  theory  has  provided  a  wealth  of  resources  for  me  to  use  in  exploring  and  analyzing  my  personal  career  development.    His  theory  has  helped  me  assess  how  my  self-­‐concept  and  life  roles  got  me  to  where  I  am  now  and  also  how  they  should  continue  to  guide  my  growth  and  choices  in  the  future.       2  

×