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    Grandentry virtualmuseumtemplate 1_2 (5) Grandentry virtualmuseumtemplate 1_2 (5) Presentation Transcript

    • Welcome to the Museum of Greek Military and Art The Beginning of Techniques Artillery & Art MaterialsA Military Greek Art Journey Museum Entrance Curator’s Offices
    • Oluomachi Onyekwere, and Curator’s Office Catherine Brothers Oluoma Hi, thanks for coming to our museum. I am in 8th grade. I am thirteen years old. I am in charge of the military area of the museum. People call me “Oluoma.” My hobbies are playing computer games, reading, listening to music, any music as long as it sounds good. Catherine Hi! I’m Catherine; I’m in 8th grade, and I’m 13 years old. I am in charge of the art section of the museum. I love listening to music and I love to draw. Thanks for visiting the museum! Return to EntryNote: Virtual museums were first introduced by educators at Keith Valley Middle School in Horsham,Pennsylvania. This template was designed by Dr. Christy Keeler. View the Educational Virtual Museumswebsite for more information on this instructional technique.
    • A Military Journey Room 1 Return to Entry
    • Artillery & Techniques Room 2 Return to Entry
    • Art MaterialsRoom 3 Return to Entry
    • The Beginnings of Greek Art Room 4 Artifact 15 Return to Entry
    • Spartan BoyThesis: Military training was so important in AncientSparta for young boys because since Spartans wereoutnumbered by their slaves, they needed a large armyto keep them under control.This is a special mural done by an artist who hasbecome close to the museum and has been doingthis museum a huge favor. This particular artworkillustrates the taking away of a young boy from hismother. At the age of six or seven, Spartan boyswere taken from their parents and sent to militarytraining. Boys were being taught military so youngbecause Sparta wanted to create the strongestwarriors to keep the city-state powerful. Theymarried the strongest boys with the strongest girls "Ancient Greece: Lesson 5." Ancient Greece: Lesson 5.and the fastest boys with the fastest girls in order to N.p., n.d. Web. 15 Feb. 2013.bread the best warriors. At age twenty the men of Return toSparta moved into the barracks and became full time Exhibitsoldiers. Military service lasted until the age offorty, duty in the reserves lasted from forty to sixtyyears of age.
    • Trojan WarThesis: Military training was so important in AncientSparta for young boys because since Spartans wereoutnumbered by their slaves, they needed a large armyto keep them under control.This is an antique illustration of Greekwarriors in front of Troy during theTrojan war. The Trojan War was betweenthe Greeks and the people of Troy. Theconflict began after the Trojan princeParis abducted Helen, wife of Menelausof Sparta. When Menelaus demanded her "Greek Warriors in Front of Troy | Antique Militaryreturn, the Trojans refused. Menelaus then Illustrations." Royalty Free Images for Commercial Use & Educational Resources. N.p., n.d. Web. 15 Feb. 2013.persuaded his brother Agamemnon to leadan army against Troy. Return to Exhibit
    • Greek SoldiersThesis: Military training was so important in AncientSparta for young boys because since Spartans wereoutnumbered by their slaves, they needed a large armyto keep them under control.This is an antique 19th-centuryillustration of Ancient Greeksoldiers. There powerfulweapons and armor are visiblein this illustration. "Ancient Greek Soldiers | Antique Military Illustrations." Royalty Free Images for Commercial Use & Educational Resources. N.p., n.d. Web. 15 Feb. 2013. Return to Exhibit
    • Military TrainingThesis: Military training was so important in AncientSparta for young boys because since Spartans wereoutnumbered by their slaves, they needed a large armyto keep them under control.This picture illustrates Spartan boys military training.Some training included: infants bathing with wineinstead of water, in the belief that this toughened them,boys walking barefoot to toughen their feet, boysplaying naked to endure any pain and become stronger,sleeping on hard beds, and enduring as much pain aspossible. Their education emphasized physical, mentaland spiritual toughness and could be quite brutal.Spartans advocated running. Soldiers needed to bequick. They were taught to endure hardship and pittedagainst each other in fights by their instructors. "Sparta †A Military City-state | Www.historynotes.info." “Adolescents were used to terrorize the Helots, and in a Wwwhistorynotesinfo. N.p., n.d. Web. 15 Feb. 2013.particularly nasty tradition called a Krypteia. They weresent out at night with the goal of killing any helot Return toperceived to be a threat or unlucky enough to be Exhibitdiscovered out alone. Each fall the Spartans woulddeclare war on the Helot making it legal to kill anyHelot.
    • Spartan Swords – Short &DeadlyThesis: Military training was so important in AncientSparta for young boys because since Spartans wereoutnumbered by their slaves, they needed a large armyto keep them under control.This picture contains two ancientSpartan military swords. Spartanhoplite warriors carried a shortsword called a xiphos. This weaponhad an iron blade typically only 12-18 inches. The Spartans shorterweapon proved deadly in the crushcaused by colliding phalanxes "Spartan Weapons." Spartan Weapons. N.p., n.d. Web. 15 Feb. 2013.formations were it was capable ofbeing thrust through gaps in the Return to Exhibitenemies shield walls and armorwere there was no room for longerweapons.
    • The Kopis – The Nasty Spartan WeaponThesis: Military training was so important in AncientSparta for young boys because since Spartans wereoutnumbered by their slaves, they needed a large armyto keep them under control. This picture is another weapon that Ancient Spartan Warriors used. This was a vicious hacking weapon in the form of a thick, curved iron sword. Warriors would use this weapon more as an axe then a sword, inflicting nasty wounds compared to "Spartan Weapons." Spartan Weapons. N.p., n.d. Web. the cleaner holes made by the spear 15 Feb. 2013. and xiphos. Return to Exhibit
    • Spartan SpearheadThesis: Military training was so important in AncientSparta for young boys because since Spartans wereoutnumbered by their slaves, they needed a large armyto keep them under control.This picture represents a Spartan spearhead. TheSpartan warriors primary weapon was a spear calleda dory. It was typically believed to have beenbetween 7 to 9 feet (2.1 - 2.7 meters) in length.There was a bronze or iron curved leaf shapedspearhead with a long, cylindrical socket in whichthe shaft was placed. The butt of the spear wascapped with a butt spike called a sauroter, Greek for’lizard killer’. It could be used to stand the spearup or used as a secondary weapon if the spearhead "Spartan Weapons." Spartan Weapons. N.p., n.d. Web. 15 Feb. 2013.was broke off. Additionally, any enemies that hadfallen could be dispatched by the warriors marching Return toover them in the back ranks of the phalanx who Exhibitwere holding there spears in a vertical position.
    • The Old Bashing ShieldThesis: Military training was so important in AncientSparta for young boys because since Spartans wereoutnumbered by their slaves, they needed a large armyto keep them under control.In this mural there are Spartan soldiers inphalanx formation, but what it truly depictsare the shields used by Spartan soldiers in war.The main purpose of the Spartan shield wasdefensive; however Spartans also used it tobash their opponents. This could be to stunthem, knock them down or get some room touse another weapon. The shield could also beused as a killing weapon outright, its weight "Spartan Weapons." Spartan Weapons. N.p., n.d. Web.and thin edge making it a superb blunt 15 Feb. 2013.weapon. It weighed about 30 pounds. They Return towere constructed out of wood with an outer Exhibitlayer of bronze. The Greek letter lambda wason their shield, referring to their homelandLacedaemonia.
    • ClayThesis: Ancient Greek art was considered to be so importantin Ancient Greece because it represented the interests andlifestyle of Ancient Greeks.This is a picture of clay which is familiarto your eyes. Clay was used to makepottery in ancient Greece. The Greekswould gather clay from the earth and use itto create vases, bowls, and other pieces ofartwork. In later years, clay was used tocreate figures, including gods andgoddesses, and morals, normally male. “Clay” Clay. “potteryblog.com” N.p., n.d. Web. 15 Feb. 2013 Return to Exhibit
    • MarbleThesis: Ancient Greek art was considered to be so importantin Ancient Greece because it represented the interests andlifestyle of Ancient Greeks.This is a picture of white marble. TheGreeks would use marble to create theirfamous sculptures. White marble was notthe only type Greek artist used. Marble insculptures is shown in many Greeksculptures from 5th century BCE andbeyond. Marble also helped the sculptureslook more life-like and showed more detail,which the Greeks would try their best toshow through their artwork. Many Greeksculptures were also made of stone andwere normally painted over. “Marble texture”. Marble texture | “Www.istock.com” N.p., n.d. Web. 15 Feb. 2013 Return to Exhibit
    • Wooden CanvasThesis: Ancient Greek art was considered to be so importantin Ancient Greece because it represented the interests andlifestyle of Ancient Greeks.Although the Greeks did not create manypaintings, they would use wooden panelsor canvases such as this one. These werecalled „panel paintings‟. Panel paintingsnormally were of figures, includingportraits and still-life. Unfortunately, thereare no Greek panel paintings that existtoday. Paintings were also created onwalls, called Wall Paintings, and wereproduced in the Classical and Hellenisticperiods. Wall Paintings are considered “Wooden canvas” Wooden canvas.“Www.johncolemanstainedglass.com”tradition and some even still exist today. N.p., n.d. Web. 15 Feb. 2013 Return to Exhibit
    • GoldThesis: Ancient Greek art was considered to be so importantin Ancient Greece because it represented the interests andlifestyle of Ancient Greeks.One of the first pieces of artwork that theancient Greeks created was jewelry. Tocreate their jewelry, they used metals.These metals included gold, as shown,along with bronze, copper, and silver.These metals were used by craftsmen inshops in Greek villages. “Gold” Gold. N.p., n.d. Web. 15 Feb. 2013 Return to Exhibit
    • The Village of KnossosThesis: Ancient Greek art was considered to be so importantin Ancient Greece because it represented the interests andlifestyle of Ancient Greeks.Ancient Greek art is said to have started inthe Bronze Age civilizations. Thesecivilizations included Knossos, aspictured, Mycenae, and Troy. These werecultural centers for Greek art in the BronzeAge. The pottery created at Knossos washeavily and uniquely decorated and werelikely to be created by Knossos craftsmen,working as jobs. Unfortunately, the potterycreated at Knossos has not survived due tothe sizes of some pieces and other “Knossos” Knossos. “en.wikipedia.org” N.p., n.d. Web. 15 Feb. 2013difficulties. Return to Exhibit
    • The Village of MycenaeThesis: Ancient Greek art was considered to be so importantin Ancient Greece because it represented the interests andlifestyle of Ancient Greeks.Mycenae was another village in theBronze Age civilizations. Mycenae is saidto have settled in 2000 BC by Indo-Europeans that practiced herding andfarming. During the late Bronze Age,Mycenae was a fortified hill surrounded byhamlets and estates. The rulers had placedtheir stronghold in a less populated andmore remote region for it‟s defensivevalue. “Mycenae” Mycenae.“employees.oneonta.edu” N.p., n.d. Web. 15 Feb. 2013 Return to Exhibit
    • CraftsmenThesis: Ancient Greek art was considered to be so importantin Ancient Greece because it represented the interests andlifestyle of Ancient Greeks.Craftsmen played an extremely importantrole in the beginnings of ancient Greek art.The Greek craftsmen worked in smallvillages in shops, creating pottery, jewelry,sculptures, etc. They would use clay,marble, stone, etc. for their work.Craftsmen were so important to ancientGreek art, and modern art, because theyhad created these different forms of art andused these materials for art, which “Craftsmen” Craftsmen. “squidoo.com” N.p., n.d. Web.influenced Greek in later years and today‟s 15 Feb. 2013modern world of art. Return to Exhibit
    • Early Greek ArtworkThesis: Ancient Greek art was considered to be so importantin Ancient Greece because it represented the interests andlifestyle of Ancient Greeks.The craftsmen in ancient Greece hadcreated many forms of artwork that arestill created in today‟s world. Theseinclude pottery, marble sculptures, andjewelry. These creations were made withfine details and materials. The vase shownis one of the many pieces of artwork thatthese craftsmen created that would fallunder “pottery”. As you can see, thesecraftsmen would paint over their pottery.The most common things to paint were “Pottery” Pottery. “yasou.org” N.p., n.d. Web. 15 Feb. 2013horses and male figures. The jewelry thatthese craftsmen created were made of Return tometals, and the sculptures were typically Exhibitmade with marble.
    • Spartan HopliteThesis: Military training was so important in AncientSparta for young boys because since Spartans wereoutnumbered by their slaves, they needed a large armyto keep them under control.This statue depicts a hoplite warrior fromSparta. A hoplite typically had a bronze,muscled breastplate, a helmet with cheekplates, as well as greaves and other shinarmor. They carried a bowl-shaped woodand bronze shield called an aspis or hoplon.It was very heavy and protected the warriorfrom chin to knee. They also wore a scarletcape to represent them as Spartans, though "The Spartan Military." Spartan Military. N.p., n.d. Web. 15 Feb. 2013.the cape was never worn in combat. Return to Entrance
    • Phalanx FormationThesis: Military training was so important in AncientSparta for young boys because since Spartans wereoutnumbered by their slaves, they needed a large armyto keep them under control.This ancient artifact depicts the organizedformation Spartan soldiers stood in forwar. In a phalanx formation hoplitesformed shield walls by overlapping theirlarge shields, the left of each shieldprotecting the warrior to the left. Only theshins and head of the hoplite wereexposed, and these were well protected by "Random." : The Ancient Near East. N.p., n.d. Web. 15grieves and helmets. The spears of the Feb. 2013.first three ranks of a phalanx formationcould be used offensively. Return to Entrance
    • Works Cited"Ancient Greece: Lesson 5." Ancient Greece: Lesson 5. N.p., n.d. Web. 15 Feb. 2013."Ancient Greek Soldiers | Antique Military Illustrations." Royalty Free Images for Commercial Use & Educational Resources. N.p., n.d. Web. 15 Feb. 2013."Greek Warriors in Front of Troy | Antique Military Illustrations." Royalty Free Images for Commercial Use & Educational Resources. N.p., n.d. Web. 15 Feb. 2013."Random." : The Ancient Near East. N.p., n.d. Web. 15 Feb. 2013."Sparta †“ A Military City-state | Www.historynotes.info." Wwwhistorynotesinfo. N.p., n.d. Web. 15 Feb. 2013."The Spartan Military." Spartan Military. N.p., n.d. Web. 15 Feb. 2013."Spartan Weapons." Spartan Weapons. N.p., n.d. Web. 15 Feb. 2013."Trojan War." †” FactMonster.com. N.p., n.d. Web. 15 Feb. 2013.OConnell, Kim A. Ancient Greece. Berkeley Heights: MyReportLinks.com, 2004. Print. Return toRoberts, Russell. Howd They Do That in Ancient Greece? Hockessin: Mitchell Lane, 2010. Entrance Print.