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Introduction Materials for Gamification Workshop
 

Introduction Materials for Gamification Workshop

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Introductory slides for DevLearning 2 day workshop 2012.

Introductory slides for DevLearning 2 day workshop 2012.

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http://www.scoop.it 591
http://www.uleduneering.com 398
http://nancy-rubin.com 150
http://neurocampus.babelcampus.net 120
http://www.ulqcl.com 9
http://www.linkedin.com 3
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  • Various games and the problems the gamers had to solve.
  • First introduced to me by Sebastian Deterding

Introduction Materials for Gamification Workshop Introduction Materials for Gamification Workshop Presentation Transcript

  • Workshop By Karl M. Kapp Bloomsburg UniversityTwitter:@kkapp Gamification of Learning and Instruction October 29 & 30, 2012
  • Know Your Kneighbor• Objective: To Get to Know Your Fellow Workshop Learners• Gameplay – You will be divided into groups – Earn the most points per group and individual • 4 points—Know 3 things about a fellow learner • 2 point—Collect a business card • 1 point—Collect business card from instructor • 5 minutes to play Let’s Play
  • Game Results• Did you like the game?• Was it fun?• Did you score points?• How many points?• What team won? I Won!
  • Game Results I Won!• What did you learn?
  • Recommendations• Step One: Visualize what you want the learner to be doing during the game or gamification experience and what you want them to learn. • Start first with the knowledge or behavior you want the learner to be exhibiting.
  • Re-Design Know Your Kneighbor• Objective: To Get to Know Your Fellow Workshop Learners• Gameplay?
  • Test Re-Design• Objective: To Get to Know Your Fellow Workshop Learners Let’s Play
  • ChallengeYou are an instructional gamedesigner, you must develop a onepage design document to take backto work that encapsulates one gameyou can begin to develop andimplement using evidence-basedinstructional techniques.
  • ly do I app e 3How - based Wh at ar or game ies to i ples f s eg princ game strat ing g addin fication learn t? gami ulum? n & conte rric to cu Challenge re W hat a a ion mo tivat n l H ow ca gn ts esi aspec s? Ga me D ce e en o f gam influ ng L earni ? n Desig
  • Personnel Learning Objective? ou Wha t do y o w ant t om lea rn fr ? op W orksh
  • What’s Your Plan• Strategic Planning Game – Assume a Role (don’t share “Hidden” agenda). – Negotiate Communicate with Role. – Compromise is desired. Let’s Play
  • Game Results• Did you like the game?• Was it fun?• Did you score points?• How many points?• What team won?
  • Game Results• What did you learn?
  • Elements of The Game
  • What is aGame?
  • Games 1.04 2 3
  • Games 1.0 4 3 How will the ball Where is my bounce off the wall? opponentgoing to go next? In what direction should I try to move the ball?
  • Games 2.0
  • Games 2.0 What is the patternShould I shoot the aliens these aliens are on the end or in the following?middle or all the bottom aliens first? How long do I have to shoot before an alien shoots at me?
  • Games 3.0
  • What must I do toWhere do I explore achieve my goal? first? What activities are of the most value?
  • Games 4.0
  • Games 4.0 What activities give me the most return for my efforts? Can I trust this person who wants to team with me to accomplish a goal?
  • Games 4.0 Flippy wants to become friends with you. Do you want to add Flippy to your friend’s list.
  • A game is a system in which players engage in an abstract challenge, defined by rules, interactivity and feedback thatresults in a quantifiable outcome often eliciting an emotional reaction.”
  • Are games effective for learning?
  • Let’s PlayFact or Fishy…
  • Rules Write on a• A statement is presented piece of – Hold up sign and I’ll count paper. One side: Fact One side: Fishy
  • Simulation/games have to be entertaining to be educational?Sitzmann, T. (2011) A meta-analytic examination of the instructional effectiveness of computer-basedsimulation games. Personnel Psychology .Review of 65 studies. Chapter 4 “The Gamification of Learning andInstruction.”
  • FISHY!Sitzmann, T. (2011) A meta-analytic examination of the instructional effectiveness of computer-based simulation games.Personnel Psychology .Review of 65 studies. Chapter 4 “The Gamification of Learning and Instruction.”
  • Simulation/games build more confidence for on the job application of learned knowledge than classroom instruction.Sitzmann, T. (2011) A meta-analytic examination of the instructional effectiveness of computer-basedsimulation games. Personnel Psychology .Review of 65 studies. Chapter 4 “The Gamification of Learning andInstruction.”
  • Fact, 20% higher confidence levels.Sitzmann, T. (2011) A meta-analytic examination of the instructional effectiveness of computer-basedsimulation games. Personnel Psychology .Review of 65 studies. Chapter 4 “The Gamification of Learning andInstruction.”
  • In a Meta-Analysis…Knowledge retention forgame/simulation was 17%higher than a lecture. Is that Fact or Fishy?
  • Fact! Delivery Method vs. % Higher Game/Simulation Lecture 17% Discussion 5%Sitzmann, T. (2011) A meta-analytic examination of the instructional effectiveness of computer-basedsimulation games. Personnel Psychology .Review of 65 studies. Chapter 4 “The Gamification of Learning andInstruction.”
  • Fact! Retention/ % Higher Type of Knowledge Retention 9% Declarative 11% Procedural 14%Sitzmann, T. (2011) A meta-analytic examination of the instructional effectiveness of computer-basedsimulation games. Personnel Psychology .Review of 65 studies. Chapter 4 “The Gamification of Learning andInstruction.”
  • - Realistic simulators for contemporary Leadership Training- Integrate these games into leadership development programs- Attempt various leadership structures-Employees may make hundreds of leadership decision an hour in a game Leadership’s Online Labs Leadership’s Online Labs Harvard Business Harvard Business Review, May 2008 Review, May 2008
  • Percentages of Impact Retention It wasn’t the game, it was % Higher level of activity in the game. Type of Knowledge Retention 9% In other words, the Procedural engagement of the learner in 14% the game leads to learning. Declarative 11%Sitzmann, T. (2011) A meta-analytic examination of the instructional effectiveness of computer-basedsimulation games. Personnel Psychology .Review of 65 studies. Chapter 4 “The Gamification of Learning andInstruction.”
  • Instructional games should be embedded in instructional programs that include debriefing and feedback. Engagement Instructional support to help learners understandEducational the game increases how to use instructionalSimulation effectiveness of the gaming Game experience. PedagogyHays, R. T. (2005). The effectiveness of instructional games: A literature review andHays, R. T. (2005). The effectiveness of instructional games: A literature review anddiscussion. Naval Air Warfare Center Training Systems Division (No 2005-004). Chapter 4discussion. Naval Air Warfare Center Training Systems Division (No 2005-004). Chapter 4“The Gamification of Learning and Instruction.”“The Gamification of Learning and Instruction.”
  • Example
  • TransferThe ability of simulations to teach skills that transfer to real-life, on-the-job situations seems abundantly positive…Computer-based simulations—assessed as an alternative toother means of training, as a supplement to other means oftraining, as a device to combat skill decay in experiencedtrainees, and as a means of improving performance levels asthey stand prior to training—show positive results fortransfer a majority of the time. In 22 out of 26 studies, trainees demonstrated equal or superior transfer to the control group from simulations. Shenan Hahn ADL Research and Evaluation Team
  • Recommendations• Step Two: Identify the instructional objectives that support the game or gamified experience you are creating. • What does the person need to learn or practice to display the outcome you desire.
  • Level of Interactivity Type of Low Medium High Type of Game Play Knowledge (Customer Taught Development)Exploration/Simulation $25,000- $35,000- $50,000- Problem-Engine/Free Play Area $35,000 $50,000 $300,000 SolvingBranching story, On-Line $10,000- $15,000- $30,000- ConceptualBoard Games $15,000 $30,000 $50,000 Knowledge/ RulesMatching, Trivia Games, $1,500- $3,000- $5,000- DeclarativeDrag and Drop Games $3,000 $5,000 $20,000 Knowledge/ Fact/Jargon
  • Recommendations1) Use a game/simulation to provide a context for the learning.2) Don’t focus on “entertainment” or “fun.”3) Carefully craft the simulation/game to provide opportunities to increase engagement and interactivity to increase learning.
  • What Learning Outcomes do you Want?
  • Use game-based mechanics,aesthetics and game thinking toengage people, motivate action, promote learning, and solve problems. Gamification
  • System with an abstract challenge, defined by rules, interactivity and feedback that results in a quantifiable outcome. Game Space NOT Game Space
  • Mechanics CharactersGoal Points Levels
  • Aesthetics—Creating a welldesigned experience for the learner.
  • Game Thinking—Taking everydayexperiences and translating it into a game or adding game elements.
  • NikePlus Stats for Karl Engage and Motivate Action
  • Promote Learningand Solve Problems
  • Gaming (Serious ) Games Gamification Simulations Course HeroWhole Part Toys Playful Design Legos iPhone PlayingFrom Game Design Elements to Gamefulness: Defining “Gamification”, Deterding, S. et. al
  • http://success.adobe.com/microsites/levelup/index.html
  • http://www.coursehero.com/courses/
  • 2 weeks after launching Courses (powered by gamification), CourseHeroreceived 350 suggested edits to existing courses and 122 requests for newcourses.Another 68 people offered to augment existing courses by creating theirown course to be hosted on coursehero.com.
  • Since the implementation of gamification elements, time onsite overall has increased around 5 percent.
  • For Gamified courses, the time on site for the Courses are nearlythree times as long as time onsite for all of coursehero.com.Social sharing of achievements increased nearly 400 percent inthree months.
  • Some people think Gamification is only about points, badges, progress bars and rewards…PBL (Points, Badges, Leader Boards)…
  • … if it was, this would be the most engaging game in the world.
  • 20% increase in profile completion.
  • … but the possibilities of “gamification” are far larger than points, badges, rewards and leaderboards.
  • Ok, great stuff but…how do I get started?
  • Questions to Ask?• What is the outcome of the game? – What do we want the learner to know how to do when done playing the game?• What are the tasks that must be demonstrated in the game to achieve the outcome?• How can we verify the outcome as been achieved?
  • Questions to Ask• What is the “message” of the game?• What will make the game “educational”?• What qualities of the game will make it effective or ineffective?• What could be done to make the game engaging?
  • Element ExampleOverview of The concept is to create a web-based single player online game forConcept pharmaceutical sales representatives that provide engaging, relevant, and personalized learning on the topic of opening and closing a conversation with a physician. Topics covered in the Write down a game game are tied to our ABC engagement model. The game is based on a realistic setting of a physician’s office. It will happen from a or gamification third-person perspective. The learner will be evaluated on concept you have. credibility, affability and the ability to become an information source for the physician.Outcome Pharmaceutical sales representatives will properly use the ABC model to gain more time with the physician and become a valuable resource to the physician.Instructional At the end of the game, the learners will be able to:Objectives •Properly apply the three steps of an ABC opening. •Properly apply the two steps of the ABC closing. •Appropriately prepare for a call on a physician. Affective •Behave in a warm, friendly, professional manner toward the physician.
  • Elements ofGames that Aid Learning• Story• Character• Recognition• Levels• Challenges• Chance• Replayability• Aesthetics• Time• Continual Feedback• Progress