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Food Analysis
 

Food Analysis

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Library Instruction course on researching methods of food analysis.

Library Instruction course on researching methods of food analysis.

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    Food Analysis Food Analysis Presentation Transcript

    • Selection of Method for Analysis of a Specific Substance in Food FSHN 462
    • The Assignment…
      • Select, from the list below, one food constituent.
      • Using library databases, AGRICOLA or Web of Science, do a literature search of methods for quantitatively determining the food constituent. Select two methods based on different principles for measuring the component in a specific food from the scientific literature
      • Record your strategy. How did you find the methods? What database did you use. What keywords? etc.
      • For the two methods you have selected
        • Give a comparison of the sensitivity, precision, and accuracy of the methods.
        • Choose between the two methods.
        • Include copies of published papers used for your report.
        • Include your search strategy.
    • Food Constituents
      • Calcium
      • Iron
      • Copper
      • Mercury
      • Lead
      • Vitamin A
      • Chlorophyll
      • Sucrose
      • Pectic Acid
      • Fructose
      • Starch
      • Anthocyanins
      • Oleic Acid
      • Butyric Acid
      • Linoleic Acid
      • Parathion
      • Vitamin E
      • Vitamin B1
      • Vitamin B2
      • Odor constituents of onions
      • Odor constituents of apples
      • Odor constituents of citrus oils
      • Methionine
      • Lysine
      • Tryptophan
      • Rutin
      • Linolenic Acid
      • Acetic Acid
      • Lactic Acid
      • Malic Acid
      • Nitrosamine
      • Nitrate
      • Nitrite
      • Myoglobin
      • Peroxidase
      • Lipoxygenase
      • Polyphenol Oxidase
      • Alkaline Phosphatase
      • Aspartame
      • Saccharin
      • Cyclamate
    • Databases: Where to Find Journal Articles
      • Food Science Databases
      • AGRICOLA 
      • CAB Abstracts
      • Food Science & Technology Abstracts
      • SciFinder Scholar
      • Web of Science 
      •  Remember, these are the two mentioned specifically in your assignment
      • WSU Libraries Databases by Subject :
      • Food Science
      • Agriculture & Resource Economics
      • Cross Search
      • Cross Search searches multiple databases, in the subject you select, at the same time.
    • “ A Rose is a Rose is a Rose.” -Gertrude Stein
      • Many of the components on the list have other names. The following are places to find synonyms for some of the components listed.
      • Dictionary of Chemistry (Oxford): Available online from the WSU Libraries, or WSU Owen Reference QD5 .D4985 2000
      • Hawley’s Condensed Chemical Dictionary WSU Owen Reference QD5.C5 2007
      • Wiley Encyclopedia of Food Science and Technology WSU Owen Reference TP368.2 E62 2000
    • Searching Databases & Catalogues Searching tips that you can use with any database or library catalogue.
    • Boolean Searching: AND, OR, AND NOT
      • Use AND to narrow/focus searches
        • Why? Databases and catalogues will retrieve record where all terms connected with AND appear
        • For example, vitamin c AND sea buckthorn
      • Use OR to expand searches
        • Why? Databases and catalogues will retrieve records where either term connected by OR appears.
        • For example, vitamin c OR ascorbic acid
      • Use NOT or AND NOT to limit a search to one term and at the same time eliminate another term
        • For example, you are looking for studies of vitamin c, but not ester-c. Your search may look like this vitamin c NOT ester-c or it may look like “vitamin c” AND NOT ester-c.
        • Use AND NOT/NOT judiciously. You may eliminate something you need.
    • Searching for Variant Endings and Spelling
      • Truncation uses a symbol, usually an asterisk (*), to retrieve variant endings of a root word.
        • Environment* will retrieve environments, environmental, environmentalism.
        • The vast majority of databases and catalogues use the * to truncate, but some databases use other symbols like # or ?
        • Be careful not to over-truncate. Using eth* to retrieve articles with ethyl alcohol and ethanol will also retrieve ethic, ethics, ethical, ethnic, ethnicity.
      • Symbols like the ? or * can also be used to search for variant spellings or plural forms as well.
        • Colo?r will retrieve both color and colour
        • H?emophilia will retrieve both haemophilia and hemophilia
        • Most databases use either the ? or * to indicate a search for variant spellings, but some databases use other symbols like #.
    • Searching phrases
      • When searching any catalogue or database enclose phrases in quotation marks.
        • If you are looking for articles on vitamin c, and don’t put it in quotes, you get every record with vitamin and c . That doesn’t sound so bad until you find that article on Vitamin B12 by Jane C. Public, PhD.
        • That search for vitamin c in sea buckthorn will look like this, “vitamin c” AND “sea buckthorn”
    • Grouping Searches
      • When grouping terms together use parentheses.
        • Why? Parentheses “force the order”. They instruct the database/catalogue to search the set in parentheses first.
          • If you sat in algebra class and said, I’ll never use this again…
        • You can still search for phrases using quotation marks, and you can tie groups of parentheses together with AND, OR, AND NOT to create complex searches
    • Putting Searches Together
      • What is your question? This can be assigned by your professor or one your come up with yourself.
        • “ What are the methods used for determining the amount of vitamin c in sea buckthorn berries?”
      • Form your search strategy:
        • Collect your keywords/key phrases together.
        • Identify synonyms for those keywords/key phrases.
          • For example, some synonyms for “vitamin c” include “ascorbic acid” and “ascorbate”
          • Having trouble finding synonyms, try a dictionary, subject dictionary, or thesaurus.
    • Putting Searches Together
        • Group synonyms together using parentheses and connect them with OR
          • (“vitamin c” or “ascorbic acid” or ascorbate)
          • (“sea buckthorn” or “Hippophae rhamnoides L.”)
          • (method or technique)
          • (content or amount or quantit*)
          • Remember, put quotes around phrases
        • Tie concepts together with AND.
          • (“vitamin c” or “ascorbic acid” or ascorbate) AND (“sea buckthorn” or “Hippophae rhamnoides L.”) AND (method or technique) AND (content or amount or quantit*)
    • If at first you don’t succeed…
      • Test your search strategy. Does it work in AGRICOLA?
        • This gigantic search strategy: (“vitamin c” or “ascorbic acid” or ascorbate) AND (“sea buckthorn” or “Hippophae rhamnoides L.”) AND (method or technique) AND (content or amount or quantit*) did not work . In fact, I got an error message.
        • Sometimes you have to refine your search strategy in order to get results, much less relevant results
        • I refined my search strategy to: “vitamin c” AND “sea buckthorn” AND (analy* OR method*) AND (amount OR content OR quantit*) in AGRICOLA, and I got…
    • Success!
    • If at First You Don’t Succeed…
      • Test your search strategy. Does it work in Web of Science?
        • This gigantic search strategy: (“vitamin c” or “ascorbic acid” or ascorbate) AND (“sea buckthorn” or “Hippophae rhamnoides L.”) AND (method or technique) AND (content or amount or quantit*) did not work . Once again, I got an error message.
        • Sometimes you have to refine your search strategy in order to get results, much less relevant results
        • I refined my search strategy to: (“vitamin c” AND “sea buckthorn”) AND (analy* OR method*) AND (amount OR content OR quantit*) in Web of Science, and I got…
    • Try, Try Again
    • Something to keep in mind…
      • Sometimes a search works right off the bat, and sometimes you have to go back and fine-tune your search.
      • Sometimes, everything you need to know about the article in in the abtract, but not always. Research papers have a Methods section that will tell you how a test was done. If you’re not sure read the paper.
    • Karenann Jurecki [email_address] Yahoo IM: k.jurecki 335-8217