REVISED HAZARD
COMMUNICATION STANDARD
INCLUDING GHS REVISIONS

Surry Insurance Loss Prevention Services
2013
Requirements for the Revised Hazard
Communication Standard
 OSHA revised its Hazard Communication Standard

(HCS) to alig...
Training Requirements
• Training on the Label Elements
• Product identifier: how the hazardous chemical is identified
• Si...
Labels: Product Identifier:
• The product identifier is the name and number that allows
•

•
•
•

you to identify the chem...
Labels: Product Identifier:
Name and number - to
identify the chemical

Supplier identification

Signal word
Danger or War...
Labels: Signal Word
These are words used to indicate the severity of the hazard
and alert employees to the potential hazar...
Labels: Pictograms
• There are 8 pictograms

• Health Hazards

*

• Physical Hazards

*

*

*

*

**

*

*

*

*
Labels: Pictograms
• Red borders required.

• No blank pictograms.
Labels: Pictograms – Health Hazards
Skull & Crossbones

Acute toxicity (Severe)

Exclamation Mark

Acute toxicity (Less Se...
Labels: Pictograms – Health Hazards
Health Hazard

Carcinogen
Respiratory sensitizer
Reproductive toxicity
Target organ to...
Labels: Pictograms – Health Hazards and
or Physical Hazards
Corrosive

Skin corrosion
Serious eye damage/
Eye irritation

...
Labels: Pictograms – Physical Hazards
Flame
Exploding Bomb

Explosives
Self reactive
Organic peroxides

Flammables
Self re...
Labels: Pictograms – Physical Hazards
Flame Over Circle

Oxidizers
Explosives
Self reactive
Organic peroxides

Gas Cylinde...
Labels with more than one Pictograms

Corrosive

Flame Over Circle Gas Cylinder
Labels: Hazard Statements
• “Hazard statement” - a statement assigned to a hazard

class and category that describes the n...
Label: Precautionary Statements
 Precautionary statements describe recommended

measures that should be taken to protect ...
How do we use this
information on the label:
Proper storage of
hazardous chemical

Personal Protective
Equipment

Informat...
Labels: Secondary containers
• Employers who only store chemicals may either

use OSHA’s new labeling system or continue u...
Labels: GHS Comparison
GHS classification ratings order of severity differ
from NFPA and HMIS:
HMIS/NFPA
0 = Least Hazardo...
Safety Data Sheets
• Under the new Haz Com

Standard, Material Safety Data
Sheets (MSDS) are now called
Safety Data Sheets...
Section 1, Identification includes product identifier;
manufacturer or distributor name, address, phone
number; emergency ...
Section 2,
Hazard(s)
identification
includes all
hazards
regarding
the chemical
and required
label
elements.
Section 2, Hazard(s)
identification Continued
Section 3,Hazard Ingredients:
Composition and information on
chemical ingredients
Section 4, Firstaid measures
includes
important
symptoms/
effects, acute,
delayed and
required
treatment.
Section 5, Firefighting
measures lists
suitable
extinguishing
techniques,
equipment and
the chemical
hazards from
fire.
Section 6, Accidental release
measures lists emergency
procedures, protective
equipment, and proper methods
of containment...
Section 7, Handling and storage
lists precautions for safe handling
and storage, including
incompatibilities.
Section 8,
Exposure
Controls/Personal
Protection
List OSHA's
Permissible
Exposure Limits
(PELs); Threshold
Limit Values
(T...
Section 9, Physical and chemical
properties and lists the
chemical's characteristics.
Section 10, Stability and
reactivity lists chemical stability
and possibility of hazardous
reactions.
Section 11,
Toxicological
information
includes routes of
exposure; related
symptoms, acute
and chronic effects;
numerical
...
Section 12
Ecological
Information

Section 13 Disposal
Information
Section 14
Transportation
information
Section 15 EPA
information and
requirements
Section 16
Other
Information
Randy Cranfill, MESH, CPSI, CSRM
Director of Safety and Loss Prevention
Surry Insurance
336-831-4299
randy.cranfill@surryi...
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  • REVISED Hazard Communication STANDARDIncluding GHS Revisions
    This training session is to provide information to employees who work with hazardous chemicals and substances.
    Graphics: OSHA.gov
    Photo courtesy of OSHA
  • Requirements for the Revised Hazard Communication Standard
    OSHA revised its Hazard Communication Standard to align with the United Nations’ Globally Harmonized System of Classification and Labeling of Chemicals.
    There are two significant changes a standardized format for Safety Data Sheets (SDSs), formerly known as, Material Safety Data Sheets (MSDSs) and use of the new label elements and SDS requirements
    This will improve worker understanding of the hazards associated with the chemicals in their workplace.
  • Training Requirements
    Training on the Label Elements
    Product identifier: how the hazardous chemical is identified
    Signal word: used to indicate the relative level of severity of the hazard
    Pictogram: OSHA’s required pictograms
    Hazard statement(s): describe the nature of the hazard(s)
    Precautionary statement(s): phrase that describes recommended measures to minimize or prevent adverse effects of the chemical
    Location of: Name, address and phone number of the chemical manufacturer, distributor, or importer
    Training on the format of the Safety Data Sheets (SDS)
    Standardized16-section format
  • Labels: Product Identifier:
    The product identifier , allows you to identify the chemical in the container.
    It will include Supplier identification -name, address, and telephone number for the chemical manufacturer, importer, or other supplier.
    And the chemical label will include one of two signal words that tell you the relative severity of the hazard presented.
    “Danger” or “Warning”
  • Lets take a closer look at the sample label
    Upper left (click1) product identifier where you will find the Code or number (418) and the product name (418 Developer)
    Next is the (click2) Supplier identification name, address, and telephone number for the chemical manufacturer,
    Upper right (click3) is the signal words
    “Danger”
    “Warning”
  • Labels: Signal Word
    These are words used to indicate the severity of the hazard
    “DANGER”(more severe hazard)
    “WARNING” (less severe hazard
    In the past, there have been several signal words that may have been used to indicate a hazard like caution, warning, danger.
    The GHS permits the use of only 2 signal words: “Danger” or “Warning”. Only 1 of the signal words is permitted to appear on the label based on the classification of the chemical.
    Not all labels will have a signal word. Some chemicals are not hazardous enough to require that a signal word appear on the label
  • Labels: Pictograms:
    The new labels will have pictograms
    There are 8 pictograms (click1) 3 for Health Hazards (click2) 4 for Physical Hazards (click3) 1 shared with both Health and Physical
    There are 3 pictograms specific to health hazards: Exclamation Mark , Health Hazard (silhouette of a person with starburst on the chest) and Skull & Crossbones.
    Lets look at the pictogram with a starburst, it could indicate the chemical is a (click4) carcinogen
    and the pictogram the exclamation mark could indicate a chemical that can cause (click5) irritant to skin and eyes.
    The pictogram that is shared by both physical and/or health hazard is that of a corrosive chemical.
    The chemical could be hazardous to health as well damaging to metals.
    There are 4 pictograms specific to physical hazards: Exploding Bomb, Flame, Flame Over Circle (oxidizer) and Gas Cylinder.
  • All pictograms will have red borders
    None will be blank pictograms
    The following slides will provide more detail related to the pictograms.
  • Pictograms for Health Hazards
    These 2 pictograms are specific to acute toxicity (short-term exposure).
    The Skull & Crossbones is for any substance that is classified as having acute toxicity in health hazard category 1-3 (the most hazardous )
    and the acute toxicity health class, category 4 (least hazardous) is represented by an Exclamation Mark.
    If the substance is properly labeled, these 2 pictograms will never appear on the same label.
  • Pictograms for Health Hazards:
    The pictogram to the right is called the “Health Hazard” pictogram and is represented by the starburst across the chest.
    This is used to indicate that the substance is a chronic (over time) and could target certain organ or other hazards.
  • Pictograms for Health Hazards and or Physical Hazards:
    The corrosive pictogram used to designate corrosion to metal, it is the same pictogram used for skin corrosion/serious eye damage/eye irritation under the health hazard classification.
  • Pictograms for Physical Hazards:
    These pictograms represent physical hazards.
    The one on the left Exploding Bomb
    The one on right is a Flame one you would see on flammable chemicals
  • Pictograms for Physical Hazards:
    These pictograms represent physical hazards.
    The one on the left Flame Over Circle “Oxidizers”
    The one on right Gas Cylinder with Gases under Pressure
  • Labels with more than one Pictograms:
    Some products could have more that one pictogram for that product..
    In this product the pictogram on the left (click 1) indicates that it is Corrosive and could have a Health and or Physical Hazard
    Not all health hazards represented by this pictogram are corrosive to metal so it is important to look for additional information on the label and in the SDS
    The one in the middle (click2) the Flame over circle is a chemicals that is an Oxidizers that can emit oxygen and increase the risk of fire.
    The one on the right (click3) is a Gas Cylinder indicates that this product is gases under pressure
  • Labels Hazard Statements:
    Hazard statement will show the hazard class (with the pictogram) the category (with the signal word) and the nature of the hazard (with the hazard statement)
    Lets look at some examples: The first one on the left (click1) has a “Scull &Crossbones”(Health Acute toxicity)
    with a signal word (click2) of “Danger”(severe hazard) and the HOW you can be harmed by (click3) -is in the Hazard Statement “Fatal if inhaled”
    Look at the one on the right (click4) has a “Exclamation Mark ”(Health Acute toxicity)
    with a signal word (click5) of “Warning”(least hazardous) and the HOW you can be harmed by (click6) - is in the Hazard Statement “Harmful if inhaled”
  • Label: Precautionary Statements
    "Precautionary statement" means a phrase that describes recommended measures that should be taken to minimize or prevent adverse effects resulting from exposure to a hazardous chemical,
    It could give you information how to properly store and handle the product.
    For example: A precautionary statement may state “Wear respiratory protection”; to minimize or prevent exposure
    Example on proper storage “Store in a well ventilated place”
  • How do we use this information on the label:
    Under the Precautionary Statement
    (click1) Proper storage of hazardous chemical- “Keep container tightly closed”
    (click2) Personal Protective Equipment “Wear protective gloves”
    (click3) Information on First Aid “ If exposed call Poison Center”
    (click4) Hazard Statement Target organs “May cause liver and kidney damage”
  • Labels: Secondary containers
    Often chemicals are stored in secondary containers:
    You will need to use the new OSHA labeling system or
    The NFPA 704 rating system or the HMIS system
    This can be confusing lets take look at the differences
  • Labels: GHS Comparison
    At this time there is a difference between GHS classification rating and the HMIS/NFPA
    HMIS/NFPA rating says that
    0 = Least Hazardous
    4 = Most Hazardous
    GHS rating says that
    5 = Least Hazardous
    1 = Most Hazardous
  • Safety Data Sheets
    Under the new Haz Com Standard, Material Safety Data Sheets (MSDS) are now called Safety Data Sheets (SDS).
    Manufacturers, importers and distributers may begin using the new 16-section format SDS (follows the ANSI standard)
    All SDSs will have a consistent 16-section format.
    Employers are required to maintain copies of all SDSs for the chemicals used and/or stored within the work area.
    The employer are to maintain a copy of the most current SDS and archive prior MSDSs/SDSs.
    In the following slides we will look at each one of the sections.
  • Section 1, Identification includes product identifier (click1)(click2);(click3) manufacturer or distributor name, address, phone number; emergency phone number; recommended use; restrictions on use.
  • Section 2, Hazard(s) identification includes all hazards regarding the chemical; required label elements.
    The GHS Categories (click1) (note the pictogram)
    The HMIS and NFPA labeling
    Precautionary Statements: (click2) “Wear protective gloves/clothing/ eye protection”
    Precautionary Statements: (click3) “ Store locked up”
  • Section 2, Hazard(s) identification Continued
    The second part of Section 2 give you the
    Exposure Routes and Symptoms Summary:
    (click1) Eyes--- Causes serious eye burns
    (click2) Ingestion --- May be harmful if swallowed. Causes burns to the gastrointestinal tract.
  • Section 3,Hazard Ingredients the Composition of the chemical ingredients and trade secret claims.
    (click1) Sodium Hydroxide 7-11% with de-ionized water is the main component.
  • Section 4, First-aid measures: it includes important symptoms/ effects, acute, delayed; required treatment.
    (click1) If in eyes---- shows the symptoms: Immediate: Redness, pain, blurred vision, severe burns
    the response : Rinse cautiously with water for several minutes.
  • Section 5, Fire-fighting measures lists suitable extinguishing techniques, equipment; chemical hazards from fire.
    This section will tell you if it has an Auto-ignition Temperature and its Flash Point
    In case of fire: (click1) Response---(click2) Use dry chemical
    (click3) Combustion Products--- Produces sodium oxides (if it burns)
  • Section 6, Accidental release measures lists emergency procedures; protective equipment; proper methods of containment and cleanup.
    (click1) Containment--- Avoid release to the environment
    (click 2) Cleaning---- Sprinkle inert absorbent compound onto spill
  • Section 7, Handling and storage lists precautions for safe handling and storage, including incompatibilities.
    (click1) Prevention –”Do not get in eye, on skin, or on clothing
    (click2) Handling – “Wear protective gloves/clothing/eye protection” and it also makes recommendations on the type of protective equipment
    (click3) Storage – “Keep container tightly closed”
  • Section 8, Exposure controls/personal protection lists OSHA's Permissible Exposure Limits (PELs); Threshold Limit Values (TLVs); appropriate engineering controls; personal protective equipment (PPE).
    Routes of Entry
    (click1) Eyes, ingestion, inhalation, and skin
    Substances with Occupational Exposure Limit Values
    (click2) Chemical Name: sodium hydroxide
    (click3) Long Term Exposure Limits (PEL)2 mg/m3
    Engineering Controls
    (click4) Ventilation Keep airborne concentrations below exposure limits.
    Respiratory Protection
    (click5) If exposed to mist, wear air-purifying respirator with a full-face
    mask.
  • Section 9, Physical and chemical properties lists the chemical's characteristics.
    Look like, feels like and smells like
    (click1) Appearance Clear
    (click2) Physical State Liquid
    (click3) Odor odorless
    pH 14
  • Section 10, Stability and reactivity lists chemical stability and possibility of hazardous reactions.
    Good to know information:
    (click1) Stabilities: Chemically stable at normal temperatures and pressures
    Often this will be chemicals it doesn’t work with or could produce hazards when mixed.
    (click2) Incompatibilities: Strong oxidizing agents, strong acids, metals (zinc, aluminum, tin,
    and so on), ammonium salts
  • Section 11, Toxicological information includes routes of exposure; related symptoms, acute and chronic effects; numerical measures of toxicity.
    Toxi·co·logi·cal
    The study of the nature, effects, and detection of poisons and the treatment of poisoning.  
  • Section 12 Ecological Information
    (click1) Example “Harmful to aquatic life”
    Section 13 Disposal Information
    (click2) Example: Dispose of contents in accordance with all local, regional, national, and international
    regulations.
  • Section 14 Transportation information
  • Section 15 EPA information and requirements
  • Section 16 Other Information
    (click1) SDS prepared by
    Date issued
    Supersedes (good place to check to see if you have the most current version)
  • Hazcom including ghs revisions-silps 2013-6-4-2013 show

    1. 1. REVISED HAZARD COMMUNICATION STANDARD INCLUDING GHS REVISIONS Surry Insurance Loss Prevention Services 2013
    2. 2. Requirements for the Revised Hazard Communication Standard  OSHA revised its Hazard Communication Standard (HCS) to align with the United Nations’ Globally Harmonized System of Classification and Labeling of Chemicals (GHS) and published it in the Federal Register in March 2012  Two significant changes contained in the revised standard require the use of new labeling elements and a standardized format for Safety Data Sheets (SDSs), formerly known as, Material Safety Data Sheets (MSDSs).  The new label elements and SDS requirements will improve worker understanding of the hazards associated with the chemicals in their workplace.
    3. 3. Training Requirements • Training on the Label Elements • Product identifier: how the hazardous chemical is identified • Signal word: used to indicate the relative level of severity of the hazard • Pictogram: OSHA’s required pictograms • Hazard statement(s): describe the nature of the hazard(s) • Precautionary statement(s): phrase that describes recommended measures to minimize or prevent adverse effects of the chemical • Location of: Name, address and phone number of the chemical manufacturer, distributor, or importer • Training on the format of the Safety Data Sheets (SDS) •Standardized16-section format
    4. 4. Labels: Product Identifier: • The product identifier is the name and number that allows • • • • you to identify the chemical in the container. Supplier identification must include the name, address, and telephone number for the chemical manufacturer, importer, or other supplier. The chemical label will include one of two signal words that tell you the relative severity of the hazard presented. “Danger” is used for the more severe hazards. “Warning” is used for less severe hazards and is less serious than “Danger.”
    5. 5. Labels: Product Identifier: Name and number - to identify the chemical Supplier identification Signal word Danger or Warning
    6. 6. Labels: Signal Word These are words used to indicate the severity of the hazard and alert employees to the potential hazard. Only 2 signal words will appear: “DANGER”(more severe hazard) “WARNING” (less severe hazard) Not all labels will have a signal word. Some chemicals are not hazardous enough to require that a signal word appear on the label.
    7. 7. Labels: Pictograms • There are 8 pictograms • Health Hazards * • Physical Hazards * * * * ** * * * *
    8. 8. Labels: Pictograms • Red borders required. • No blank pictograms.
    9. 9. Labels: Pictograms – Health Hazards Skull & Crossbones Acute toxicity (Severe) Exclamation Mark Acute toxicity (Less Severe): Irritant Dermal sensitizer Acute toxicity (harmful) Narcotic effects Respiratory tract irritation
    10. 10. Labels: Pictograms – Health Hazards Health Hazard Carcinogen Respiratory sensitizer Reproductive toxicity Target organ toxicity Mutagenicity Aspiration Hazard
    11. 11. Labels: Pictograms – Health Hazards and or Physical Hazards Corrosive Skin corrosion Serious eye damage/ Eye irritation Corrosive to Metals
    12. 12. Labels: Pictograms – Physical Hazards Flame Exploding Bomb Explosives Self reactive Organic peroxides Flammables Self reactive Pyrophoric Self heating Emits flammable gas Organic peroxides
    13. 13. Labels: Pictograms – Physical Hazards Flame Over Circle Oxidizers Explosives Self reactive Organic peroxides Gas Cylinder Gases under Pressure
    14. 14. Labels with more than one Pictograms Corrosive Flame Over Circle Gas Cylinder
    15. 15. Labels: Hazard Statements • “Hazard statement” - a statement assigned to a hazard class and category that describes the nature of the hazard(s) of a chemical, including, where appropriate, the degree of hazard. • For example: Harmful if inhaled [for Category 4 Acute Toxicity - Inhalation] Pictogram Signal word Danger Danger Danger Warning Hazard statement Fatal if inhaled Fatal if inhaled Toxic if inhaled Harmful if inhaled
    16. 16. Label: Precautionary Statements  Precautionary statements describe recommended measures that should be taken to protect against hazardous exposures, or improper storage or handling of a chemical. Examples: Wear respiratory protection Wash with soap and water Store in a well ventilated place
    17. 17. How do we use this information on the label: Proper storage of hazardous chemical Personal Protective Equipment Information on First Aid Target organs www.osha.gov/Publications/HazComm_QuickCard_Labels.htm
    18. 18. Labels: Secondary containers • Employers who only store chemicals may either use OSHA’s new labeling system or continue using the NFPA 704 rating system or HMIS system • (OSHA plans to change the labeling system June 1, 2016)
    19. 19. Labels: GHS Comparison GHS classification ratings order of severity differ from NFPA and HMIS: HMIS/NFPA 0 = Least Hazardous 4 = Most Hazardous GHS 5 = Least Hazardous 1 = Most Hazardous
    20. 20. Safety Data Sheets • Under the new Haz Com Standard, Material Safety Data Sheets (MSDS) are now called Safety Data Sheets (SDS). • All SDSs will have a consistent 16-section format. • Employers must ensure that SDSs are readily accessible to employees.
    21. 21. Section 1, Identification includes product identifier; manufacturer or distributor name, address, phone number; emergency phone number; recommended use; restrictions on use.
    22. 22. Section 2, Hazard(s) identification includes all hazards regarding the chemical and required label elements.
    23. 23. Section 2, Hazard(s) identification Continued
    24. 24. Section 3,Hazard Ingredients: Composition and information on chemical ingredients
    25. 25. Section 4, Firstaid measures includes important symptoms/ effects, acute, delayed and required treatment.
    26. 26. Section 5, Firefighting measures lists suitable extinguishing techniques, equipment and the chemical hazards from fire.
    27. 27. Section 6, Accidental release measures lists emergency procedures, protective equipment, and proper methods of containment and cleanup.
    28. 28. Section 7, Handling and storage lists precautions for safe handling and storage, including incompatibilities.
    29. 29. Section 8, Exposure Controls/Personal Protection List OSHA's Permissible Exposure Limits (PELs); Threshold Limit Values (TLVs); appropriate engineering controls; personal protective equipment (PPE).
    30. 30. Section 9, Physical and chemical properties and lists the chemical's characteristics.
    31. 31. Section 10, Stability and reactivity lists chemical stability and possibility of hazardous reactions.
    32. 32. Section 11, Toxicological information includes routes of exposure; related symptoms, acute and chronic effects; numerical measures of toxicity.
    33. 33. Section 12 Ecological Information Section 13 Disposal Information
    34. 34. Section 14 Transportation information
    35. 35. Section 15 EPA information and requirements
    36. 36. Section 16 Other Information
    37. 37. Randy Cranfill, MESH, CPSI, CSRM Director of Safety and Loss Prevention Surry Insurance 336-831-4299 randy.cranfill@surryinsurance.com Information contained in this publication is compiled from sources believed to be reliable. Surry Insurance makes no guarantee as to, and assumes no responsibility for, the accuracy, adequacy or completeness of such information.
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