Haiti Presentation

853 views
813 views

Published on

Haiti Update presentation that I performed in May 2010.

0 Comments
0 Likes
Statistics
Notes
  • Be the first to comment

  • Be the first to like this

No Downloads
Views
Total views
853
On SlideShare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
7
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
10
Comments
0
Likes
0
Embeds 0
No embeds

No notes for slide
  • Updated 2/18:As of February 15, the Haitian government’s Civil Protection Agency estimates that 217,000 people died in the earthquake. The Haitian government also estimates that 97,000 houses were destroyed and 188,000 were damaged across all affected areas
  • These 50 disaster specicalists represent almost our entire roster of highly trained, international disaster response specialists. Updated 2/18In addition to permanent staff, more than 100 people from American Red Cross have been deployed since the earthquake response began. Personnel currently in Haiti and Dominican Republic include:14 permanent staff in the American Red Cross Haiti officeRelief Emergency Response Unit (2nd round of team members)IT/Telecommunications Emergency Response UnitDelegates supporting logistics, shelter, FACT team, recovery, market analysis, communications, and finance 51 Creole-speaking volunteer translators and 5 Service to Armed Forces staff serving as supervisory support on board the USNS Comfort hospital ship, offshore Port-au-Prince. A new round of volunteers is scheduled to arrive week of February 15.
  • This is more people than live in any of 15 U.S. states and larger than any but four U.S. cities: New York, Los Angeles, Chicago and Houston.  More geographic comparisons can be made using the state data available here: http://factfinder.census.gov/servlet/GCTTable?_bm=y&-geo_id=01000US&-_box_head_nbr=GCT-T1-R&-ds_name=PEP_2009_EST&-format=US-40S and city data available here:http://www.census.gov/popest/metro/CBSA-est2008-annual.html.
  • The number of flights arriving at Port-au-Prince airport continues to drop, as incoming air cargo increasingly shifts to sea transport. An assessment has raised concerns about the long-term effects of receiving heavy wide-body planes on the runway, and an 80 metric ton limit has been placed on incoming aircraft. American Airlines is starting commercial passenger flights as of February 19. A small number of commercial cargo flights have started arriving at Port-au-Prince airport.  In addition, the airport at Santo Domingo, Dominican Republic is severely congested due in part to the arrival of a large number of unsolicited goods. Road traffic congestion remains a concern in the border area of Jimani given the existence of only one route for humanitarian aid transport by land from Dominican Republic. Other routes, such as the Elias Piña border crossing, have been assessed but are not feasible permanent alternatives, particularly during the rainy season. For destinations in northern Haiti, the Dajabón border crossing is currently being used. The logistics cluster reports concerns that a large withdrawal of military support might seriously hamper humanitarian response operations, especially at the seaports. Continued support will be required, especially with equipment and in handling materials, as well as with port management and coordination. Discussions are taking place between the U.S. and Canadian military, the UN Stabilization Mission in Haiti (MINUSTAH), the World Food Program (WFP) and logistics cluster members to address current logistics issues and longer term planning.The Red Cross has logistics hubs in both Port-au-Prince and Santo Domingo, with the Red Cross relief supplies pipeline being coordinated by the Red Cross Pan American Disaster Response Unit (PADRU) in Panama.
  • As of February 15, 2.4 million individuals had received a two-week ration of rice from WFP with a total of 10,000 metric tons of rice distributed. Concurrently, WFP is also distributing  ready-to-eat meals to non-affected areas hosting displaced people. A total of 715,000 meals are being dispatched to various sites outside of Port-au-Prince and to other departments.The food cluster assessments indicate that displaced populations are affecting poor rural households–rural household sizes have increased as a result of relatives arriving from affected urban areas. The economic food market has contracted in surveyed areas due to reduced demand in terms of purchasing power and the population’s preference for free food aid.The nutrition cluster has received reports that some general food ration or Plumpy’nut distributions conducted by small NGOs have included powdered infant formula.  The cluster continues to emphasize the potential harm posed by distribution of infant formula, given the current poor sanitation situation and challenges with ensuring a hygienic environment and clean water availability. Additional Note:In regard to food, water and other relief items, it is important to stress the success of the Red Cross model of ensuring food, water and other supplies are distributed fairly and efficiently, and that other aid groups adopted our model.  We draw on the strength of our volunteer network to use voucher systems, so that the people we serve know what will arrive and when, and that they will get their fair share in a calm, safe environment.
  • Two Water and Sanitation ERUs and the ICRC are producing 1.25 million liters of safe drinking water per day to approximately 320,000 people. Approximately 25 million liters of water have been distributed in 110 different settlements. Three Mass Sanitation ERUs and the ICRC are providing latrines and sanitation. Sanitation, excreta disposal in particular, in paved or high groundwater level areas is the main concern of the water, sanitation and hygiene (WASH) cluster. The sanitation situation is daily degrading, increasing chances of a potential epidemic outbreak of waterborne diseases.  The Red Cross continues garbage collection in limited areas of Port-au-Prince. To meet waste and sanitation needs, Red Cross Mass Sanitation ERUs are constructing latrines and portable toilets in Léogâne, Couronne, La Piste, Parc Olympique and Automeca.  So far, more than 450 latrines have been built by the Red Cross in 12 settlements.The WASH Cluster estimates that a total 1.1 million displaced people in Port-au-Prince, Léogâne, Petit Goave, Gressier and Jacmel require emergency latrines. The interim plan is to provide 12,950 latrines by April (ratio of one latrine per 50 people during acute phase) and 21,000 more within six months, in order to move toward the goal of one latrine for every 20 people. The Red Cross is now producing 1.25 million liters of water per day for approximately 320,000 people. Approximately 25 million liters of water have been distributed by the Red Cross in 110 different settlements since the response began. The WASH cluster, including the Red Cross, is now providing daily water for an estimated 850,000 people at 300 sites in the Port-au-Prince, Léogâne and Jacmel.  To meet waste and sanitation needs, Red Cross Mass Sanitation ERUs are constructing latrines and portable toilets in Léogâne, Couronne, La Piste, Parc Olympique and Automeca.  So far, more than 450 latrines have been built by the Red Cross in 12 settlements
  • To date, nearly 15,000 people have been vaccinated in the coordinated immunization campaign, in which the Red Cross healthcare units and the Haitian National Red Cross Society are participating. To date, nearly 15,000 people have been vaccinated in the coordinated immunization campaign, targeting four settlements in Port-au-Prince, Jacmel and Grand Goave. The participation of all the Red Cross healthcare units and the Haitian National Red Cross Society (HNRCS) has been essential for the success of this campaign, which is being led by the Haitian government’s Ministry of Health and other UN agencies.  The first phase of this campaign will continue for another four weeks, and is providing vaccinations for illnesses such as measles and tetanus for 250,000 children who are six weeks to seven years of age. A second phase will target 530,000 children in all affected areas. The campaign is being combined with Red Cross psychosocial support, community health and hygiene promotion activities. The Red Cross field hospital at University Hospital is moving from Port-au-Prince to Petit Goave. The patient caseload in Port-au-Prince has been handed over to partners in the vicinity.The Haitian National Red Cross Society information line has sent 15 million free mobile text messages with key health information through an agreement made with a local mobile phone service.  Reports from health cluster medical teams continue to show a decline in trauma injuries requiring treatment but the need for overall medical care is rising. The number of patients seen daily by the combined Red Cross health units continues to be between 1,000 and 1,300. The total number of patients seen to date is approximately 20,000.Epidemiologically, the health situation is still very volatile due to insufficient sanitation facilities and over- crowded living conditions of approximately 700,000 people. Additionally, the population is extremely vulnerable because of both living conditions and very low vaccination coverage for all relevant diseases.  Epidemiological surveillance is underway by all health cluster partners and the Haitian government’s Ministry of Health.Additional Note:In regard to health, the Red Cross is helping to protect more than 250,000 children and adults from measles, diphtheria, pertussis and tetanus.  While usually focus our measles and other health efforts on protecting children, in Haiti, so many adults were vulnerable so we are working to ensure they receive often long-overdue medical interventions.
  • At the request of the United Nations, the International Federation of Red Cross and Red Crescent Societies (International Federation) took leadership of the shelter/non-food items (NFI) cluster on February 10. As of February 15, the Government of Haiti estimates that 97,000 houses were destroyed and 188,000 were damaged across all affected areas.The International Federation is exploring temporary shelter options, such as a prototypes made from timber, steel and existing debris. The Red Cross shelter response aims to address the complex situation by targeting the following in parallel:  respond to locally displaced households with solutions that will encourage them to stay near their homes and rebuild safely in their locality; support needs of host families; support those in spontaneous settlements by introducing emergency relief sheltering solutions. Additional note:In regard to shelter, we are facing two major challenges: the imminent (April 1) starting of the rainy season and land ownership issues which are slowing construction of transitional shelter.  We believe that rainy season floods could claim a significant number of lives. The shelter cluster reports that over 87,000 tarpaulins have been distributed along with over 17,000 family size tents. This has reached about 24 percent (or approximately 302,000 people) of an estimated 1.3 million in need of shelter support. As a minimum, the shelter cluster is recommending a target of one tent or two tarps per family of five..
  • The International Committee of the Red Cross (ICRC) and the Haitian National Red Cross Society (HNRCS) are operating family tracing activities to allow survivors to register and make contact with loved ones, however they indicate that RFL needs are diminishing in Port-au-Prince.  They maintain a tracing center in Port-au-Prince, and reach individuals in neighborhoods through three RFL mobile units. RFL units are also being established in Petit Goave, Mirebalais, Gonaives and Cap Haitien. To date, the ICRC has received 4,200 ‘safe and well’ messages on its website, and has facilitated 3,200 calls between people in Haiti and relatives living abroad. The ICRC, with assistance from HNRCS, is the only agency carrying out active tracing for unaccompanied minors. They have already registered 39 unaccompanied children and provided them with RFL services. The team in Port au Prince is also actively attempting to trace 20 children whose families are searching for them, and is working on several family reunifications between children in Haiti and their families abroad.UNICEF and other child-protection agencies in Haiti are systematically referring cases of unaccompanied and separated children to the ICRC and HNRCS.
  • UNICEF and the Haitian government’s Ministry of Education reports that out of the 6,500 schools in the affected areas, 65 percent were completely destroyed. UNICEF has started the distribution of over 150 school tents and teaching and learning materials in areas of resettlement targeting 10,000 pre-and primary school aged children. Additional identification of teachers and accelerated teacher training will accompany the distribution of the supplies.Education priorities within the next three months include opening primary schools in all non-affected or indirectly affected areas; ensuring availability of temporary learning spaces for children directly and indirectly affected by the earthquake; and coordination and planning for reconstruction of schools both in affected and non-affected areas. Psychosocial support interventions have also been identified as a priority activity as parents still have concerns about sending children to school.A Red Cross Recovery Assessment Team is conducting a cross-sectoral assessment and analysis of the recovery needs. This global Red Cross team is led by an American Red Cross delegate and its members include five additional delegates from the American Red Cross.  The assessment process – including analysis, information gathering and reporting – will take three weeks, and will be used to inform recovery programming.An Emergency Markets Mapping Analysis (EMMA) assessment to study specific economic markets in Haiti is being conducted by a multi-agency team, including an American Red Cross delegate.  Results from the EMMA are expected by February 18. The purpose of an EMMA is to improve the effectiveness and efficiency of early humanitarian actions, and to assist decision makers in designing and supporting appropriate programming.  The EMMA selected four markets to assess: two related to food security, one related to income (with shelter links), and one related to shelter needs.  The four markets are: Beans, Rice, Construction Labor, and Corrugated Iron Sheeting.  The Relief Cash Transfer Program team is in Port-au-Prince and includes four American Red Cross delegates. The team is performing assessments and is planning programming that will complement current relief item distributions.Additional note:No official recovery plan has yet been completed, but drafts are being revised, in coordination with our partners.
  • This chart will be updated regularly to reflect the evolving needs of the Haitian people. To date, the American Red Cross has spent or allocated more than $106.4M to meet the most urgent needs of earthquake survivors in Haiti.  We honor donor intent, and every last dollar designated to Haiti will eventually be spent helping communities devastated by the earthquake.
  • Haiti Presentation

    1. 1. Haiti Report<br />Progress Report <br />
    2. 2. Devastation: January 12, 2010<br />A series of earthquakes struck the island nation of Haiti, killing an estimated 217,000 people and leaving an estimated 1.2 million people instantly homeless.<br />
    3. 3. The American Red Cross: There From Day One<br />Once the first quake ended, the American Red Cross began working the clock to provide emergency relief and assistance to survivors by supplying meals, blankets, tents and emergency medical care.<br />
    4. 4. The Red Cross: A Trusted Presence in Haiti<br />The American Red Cross has had an ongoing presence in Haiti since 2004, supporting local disaster preparedness, HIV education, malaria prevention and measles immunization initiatives.<br />
    5. 5. Relief Workers Are On The Ground<br />More than 100 people are representing the American Red Cross in Haiti:<br /><ul><li>More than 50 disaster specialists are providing relief distribution and telecommunications support.
    6. 6. 14 employees, who were permanently based in Haiti prior to the earthquake, are helping to guide the response.
    7. 7. More than 50 Creole-speaking interpreters and 5 Service to Armed Forces staff are stationed offshore supporting a military hospital ship, the USNS Comfort.
    8. 8. More than 3,000 local Haitian Red Cross Society volunteers are a critical part of the response.</li></li></ul><li>From All Over the World<br />Our international relief operation has involved 600 Red Cross and Red Crescent workers from almost40 nations—more emergency response teams than any other disaster in Red Cross history.<br />
    9. 9. Our Efforts in Haiti to Date<br />
    10. 10. Two Months Later<br /><ul><li>The Red Cross has reached more than 1.9 million people with food, water, relief supplies, medical services, sanitation and shelter
    11. 11. Red Cross distributions of food and relief supplies are reaching approximately 12,500 people each day. </li></li></ul><li>Logistics: Making Relief Happen<br /><ul><li>The Red Cross has logistics hubs in both Port-au-Prince and Santo Domingo, with the Red Cross relief supplies pipeline being coordinated by the Red Cross Pan American Disaster Response Unit (PADRU) in Panama.
    12. 12. A total of 97 Red Cross flights have landed in Dominican Republic or Haiti to date. </li></li></ul><li>Food & Supplies are Being Collected & Distributed<br /><ul><li>Relief supplies for 130,000 people, including blankets, kitchen sets, hygiene kits, tarps, water containers and mosquito nets.
    13. 13. More than 2.4 million individuals have received a 2-week rice ration as of February 15.
    14. 14. 3 million pre-packaged meals to the United Nations World Food Programme.
    15. 15. Funding to help feed an additional 1 million people for a month.
    16. 16. More than 1 million water-purification sachets.
    17. 17. Funded $600,000 worth of food for the mobile health clinics.</li></li></ul><li>Clean Water & Sanitation Needs <br />The Red Cross is an important part of providing basic needs:<br /><ul><li>Distributed over 25 million liters of water in 110 different settlements—now producing 1.25 million liters of water per day for approximately 320,000 people.
    18. 18. The WASH cluster, including the Red Cross, is now providing daily water for an estimated 850,000 people at 300 sites in the Port-au-Prince, Léogâne and Jacmel. 
    19. 19. Built more than 450 latrines in 12 settlements, working to provide one latrine per 50 people by April.</li></li></ul><li>Addressing The Need For Healthcare<br />The earthquake destroyed many of the hospitals and healthcare facilities in Port-au-Prince. Red Cross teams from around the world have partnered to:<br /><ul><li>Establish two field hospitals & four mobile healthcare clinics serving approximately 1,600 patients/day.
    20. 20. Support a government-led immunization campaign that will initially help protect and educate more than 250,000 children in phase one; nearly 800,000 in total through phase 2.
    21. 21. Protect more than 250,000 children and adults from measles, diphtheria, pertussis and tetanus
    22. 22. Provide nearly 900 units of blood for earthquake survivors.</li></li></ul><li>Tackling The Problem Of Shelter<br />More than 1.3 million people in Haiti are in need of shelter. The Red Cross is:<br /><ul><li>Distributing over 87,000 tarpaulins along with over 17,000 family size tents; reaching about 24 percent (or approximately 302,000 people) of those in need of shelter support.
    23. 23. Providing families with solutions that will encourage them to rebuild safely near their pre-disaster homes.
    24. 24. Supporting the needs of host families who are housing displaced people.
    25. 25. Providing both tarps and tents to people in post-quake settlements.</li></li></ul><li>Ensuring Clear & Calm Communications<br /><ul><li>Operated a family tracing center, allowing survivors to register and make contact with loved ones; received 4,500 ‘safe and well’ messages on its website, and has facilitated 3,200 calls between people in Haiti and relatives living abroad and 22,500 names of missing relatives published.
    26. 26. Acting as the sole agency carrying out active tracing for unaccompanied minors – with nearly 40 unaccompanied children provided with services.
    27. 27. Sent 15 million free text messages with key health information through an agreement made with a local mobile phone service and The Haitian National Red Cross Society information line. </li></li></ul><li>Forging Ahead with Recovery<br /><ul><li>Working with the Ministry of Education to start the distribution of over 150 school tents and teaching and learning materials in areas of resettlement targeting 10,000 pre-and primary school aged children. Additional identification of teachers and accelerated teacher training will accompany the distribution of the supplies.
    28. 28. As of February 9, almost 67,000 people have been employed through a cash-for-work program, which is benefiting more than 333,000 people. The main activities include the removal of debris and cleaning drainage canals around Port-au-Prince.
    29. 29. Working with Fonkoze, a microfinance institution in Haiti to provide support to families hosting displacing persons and to female heads of household to help them restore their incomes. </li></li></ul><li>We Spend Donations Wisely<br />The American Red Cross is committed to using every dollar wisely. An average of 91 cents of every dollar received is invested directly into humanitarian services and programs. To date we have spent or allocated more than $106.4M to meet the most urgent needs of earthquake survivors in Haiti. <br />
    30. 30. Support Has Been Extraordinary<br />The American Red Cross has received approximately $323 million(as of February 25, 2010) for the Haiti relief and recovery efforts.<br />

    ×