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Cloud talk from BT DevCon4 (27 May 2011)

Cloud talk from BT DevCon4 (27 May 2011)

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  • \n
  • Optimistic version.\n
  • Pessimistic version.\n
  • A brief introduction to cloud computing, with digressions into agile, lean and devops.\n
  • There are lots of definitions.\n
  • [US] National Institute of Standards and Technology.\nGood definition, but a bit long.\n
  • [US] National Institute of Standards and Technology.\nGood definition, but a bit long.\n
  • [US] National Institute of Standards and Technology.\nGood definition, but a bit long.\n
  • [US] National Institute of Standards and Technology.\nGood definition, but a bit long.\n
  • [US] National Institute of Standards and Technology.\nGood definition, but a bit long.\n
  • [US] National Institute of Standards and Technology.\nGood definition, but a bit long.\n
  • [US] National Institute of Standards and Technology.\nGood definition, but a bit long.\n
  • Obligatory cat photo.\n
  • Simplified definition.\n
  • Simplified definition.\n
  • Simplified definition.\n
  • Software, platform and infrastructure. Not necessarily built on each other.\nHybrid is a mixture of clouds (possibly public and private), or a mixture of cloud and traditional servers.\n
  • Software, platform and infrastructure. Not necessarily built on each other.\nHybrid is a mixture of clouds (possibly public and private), or a mixture of cloud and traditional servers.\n
  • Software, platform and infrastructure. Not necessarily built on each other.\nHybrid is a mixture of clouds (possibly public and private), or a mixture of cloud and traditional servers.\n
  • Software, platform and infrastructure. Not necessarily built on each other.\nHybrid is a mixture of clouds (possibly public and private), or a mixture of cloud and traditional servers.\n
  • Software, platform and infrastructure. Not necessarily built on each other.\nHybrid is a mixture of clouds (possibly public and private), or a mixture of cloud and traditional servers.\n
  • Software, platform and infrastructure. Not necessarily built on each other.\nHybrid is a mixture of clouds (possibly public and private), or a mixture of cloud and traditional servers.\n
  • Basically any application that’s hosted for you.\n
  • Basically any application that’s hosted for you.\n
  • Basically any application that’s hosted for you.\n
  • Basically any application that’s hosted for you.\n
  • Basically any application that’s hosted for you.\n
  • Allow easy deployment of certain kinds of application.\n
  • Allow easy deployment of certain kinds of application.\n
  • Allow easy deployment of certain kinds of application.\n
  • Allow easy deployment of certain kinds of application.\n
  • Allow easy deployment of certain kinds of application.\n
  • Allow easy deployment of certain kinds of application.\n
  • Basic on-demand building blocks (compute, storage, database etc).\n
  • Basic on-demand building blocks (compute, storage, database etc).\n
  • Basic on-demand building blocks (compute, storage, database etc).\n
  • Basic on-demand building blocks (compute, storage, database etc).\n
  • Basic on-demand building blocks (compute, storage, database etc).\n
  • Basic on-demand building blocks (compute, storage, database etc).\n
  • Deploy a Rails app to Heroku, and spin up an EC2 instance.\n
  • What benefits does cloud give us?\n
  • Real agile, not the half-arsed kind.\nEarly and continuous delivery – obviously on-demand infrastructure helps with both.\n
  • Deploy quickly, get feedback and change direction or stop as necessary.\nTry lots of small ideas, instead of picking one and building the whole thing up front.\n
  • Continuous Integration: not just a CI server!\nAutomated testing (unit, system, integration and end-to-end).\nAlways shippable code and automated deployment enables frequent delivery.\nOn-demand infrastructure allows repeatable test environment.\n
  • Continuous Deployment\nCompanies like Flickr, Netflix, Facebook and Wordpress deploy to live several times a day.\nFlexibility of cloud allows staged upgrade and backout if necessary.\n
  • Traditional split.\nDevelopers want to change everything; ops want to keep things running smoothly.\nBig company bureaucracy makes fast or frequent deployment impossible (CRs, ePIFs, NAIFs, ACF, SPDs…)\n
  • Devops expands agile into operations.\nDev and ops people work together – devs pay more attention to operational needs, and ops enable faster changes.\nManagement of deployed systems is automated and reproducible (configuration as code).\n
  • Various tools exist to automate server setup and app deployment.\nChef and Puppet are the main open source options.\n
  • Spin up an EC2 server, configure it as a chef client, and have it set itself up with a basic web app recipe.\n
  • What needs to be done differently to make best use of cloud infrastructure?\n
  • Move from robustness (massive servers) to resilience (pools of small servers sharing the work).\nScale out, not up.\nThe loss of any single node shouldn’t stop everything working.\nSpread across multiple availability zones, regions, or even clouds.\nMaking everything redundant may not be practical for all applications, so single failure points (eg database, load balancer) will still need to be robust.\n
  • Avoid single point of failure.\nMonitor everything (including user actions – if orders suddenly stop arriving maybe something’s broken).\nTreat scaling the same as failure recovery (adding a new server to a pool is the same as replacing a failed server).\nKeep some headroom to cope with spikes.\n
  • Netflix implemented a “chaos monkey” program, which continually shuts down random parts of their infrastructure.\nIf you aren’t testing all the time, how likely is your redundancy likely to work in the event of a real failure?\n
  • Traditional model: servers are separated into various networks, protected by firewalls.\nSpecific paths through the firewalls are opened to allow necessary traffic between networks, but no more.\nRedside/greenside separation.\n
  • Web model: everything’s “in the cloud”.\nAccess to everything is via the internet.\nSecurity of individual servers and communication links becomes much more important.\n
  • So where are we in BT?\n
  • Two separate VDCs.\nGSVDC is BT’s public cloud product for businesses. \neVDC came from the need to consolidate the internal server estate. It’s a big improvement on provisioning physical servers, but it ain’t cloud (months to provision, no API, not elastic).\n
  • Built by a small BT team (mostly now gone).\nHome-grown EC2/S3-compatible platform.\nRedside and greenside (real soon now, honest!) clouds\n
  • Any questions?\n

Cloud Cloud Presentation Transcript

  • Cloud Kerry BuckleyDevCon4, 27 May 2011 http://www.flickr.com/photos/pagedooley/2511369048
  • CloudTaking advantage of a new paradigm http://www.flickr.com/photos/pagedooley/2511369048
  • CloudWhat everyone else is doing, and why we’re screwed http://www.flickr.com/photos/pandora_6666/4437905522
  • http://www.flickr.com/photos/horiavarlan/4273913228
  • “Cloud computing is a model forenabling convenient, on-demandnetwork access
  • “Cloud computing is a model forenabling convenient, on-demandnetwork access to a shared pool of configurablecomputing resources
  • “Cloud computing is a model forenabling convenient, on-demandnetwork access to a shared pool of configurablecomputing resources (e.g., networks, servers, storage, applications,and services)
  • “Cloud computing is a model forenabling convenient, on-demandnetwork access to a shared pool of configurablecomputing resources (e.g., networks, servers, storage, applications,and services) that can be rapidly provisioned and released with minimal management effort or serviceprovider interaction.
  • “Cloud computing is a model forenabling convenient, on-demandnetwork access to a shared pool of configurablecomputing resources (e.g., networks, servers, storage, applications,and services) that can be rapidly provisioned and released with minimal management effort or serviceprovider interaction. This cloud model promotes availability and is composed of five essential characteristics, three service models,and four deployment models.Essential Characteristics:
  • “Cloud computing is a model forenabling convenient, on-demandnetwork access to a shared pool of configurablecomputing resources (e.g., networks, servers, storage, applications,and services) that can be rapidly provisioned and released with minimal management effort or serviceprovider interaction. This cloud model promotes availability and is composed of five essential characteristics, three service models,and four deployment models.Essential Characteristics:On-demand self-service. A consumer can unilaterally provision computing capabilities, such as server time and network storage, as needed automatically without requiring human interactionwith each service’s provider.
  • “Cloud computing is a model forenabling convenient, on-demandnetwork access to a shared pool of configurablecomputing resources (e.g., networks, servers, storage, applications,and services) that can be rapidly provisioned and released with minimal management effort or serviceprovider interaction. This cloud model promotes availability and is composed of five essential characteristics, three service models,and four deployment models.Essential Characteristics:On-demand self-service. A consumer can unilaterally provision computing capabilities, such as server time and network storage, as needed automatically without requiring human interactionwith each service’s provider.Broad network access. Capabilities are available over the network and accessed through standard mechanisms that promote use by heterogeneous thin or thick client platforms (e.g., mobile phones, laptops, and PDAs).Resource pooling. The provider’s computing resources are pooled to serve multiple consumers using a multi-tenant model, with different physical and virtual resources dynamically assigned and reassigned according to consumer demand. There is a sense of location independence in that the customer generally has nocontrol or knowledge over the exact location of the provided resources but may be able to specify location at a higher level of abstraction (e.g., country, state, or datacenter). Examples of resources include storage, processing, memory, network bandwidth, and virtual machines.Rapid elasticity. Capabilities can be rapidly and elastically provisioned, in some cases automatically, to quickly scale out and rapidly released to quickly scale in. To the consumer, the capabilities available for provisioning often appear to be unlimited and can be purchased in any quantity at any time.Measured Service. Cloud systems automatically control and optimize resource use by leveraging a metering capability at some level of abstraction appropriate to the type of service (e.g., storage, processing, bandwidth, and active user accounts). Resource usage can be monitored, controlled, and reported providing transparency for both the provider and consumer of the utilized service.Service Models:Cloud Software as a Service (SaaS). The capability provided to the consumer is to use the provider’s applications running on a cloud infrastructure. The applications are accessible from various client devices through a thin client interface such as a web browser (e.g., web-based email). The consumer does not manage or control the underlying cloud infrastructure including network, servers, operating systems, storage, or even individual application capabilities, with the possibleexception of limited user-specific application configuration settings.Cloud Platform as a Service (PaaS). The capability provided to the consumer is to deploy onto the cloud infrastructure consumer-created or acquired applications created using programming languages and tools supported by the provider. The consumer does not manage or control the underlying cloud infrastructure including network,servers, operating systems, or storage, but has control over the deployed applications and possibly application hosting environment configurations.Cloud Infrastructure as a Service (IaaS). The capability provided to the consumer is to provision processing, storage, networks, and other fundamental computing resources where the consumer is able to deploy and run arbitrary software, which can include operating systems and applications. The consumer does not manageor control the underlying cloud infrastructure but has control over operating systems, storage, deployed applications, and possibly limited control of select networking components (e.g., host firewalls).Deployment Models:Private cloud. The cloud infrastructure is operated solely for an organization. It may be managed by the organization or a third party and may exist on premise or off premise.Community cloud. The cloud infrastructure is shared by several organizations and supports a specific community that has shared concerns (e.g., mission, security requirements, policy, and compliance considerations). It may be managed by the organizations or a third party and may exist on premise or off premise.Public cloud. The cloud infrastructure is made available to the general public or a large industry group and is owned by an organization selling cloud services.Hybrid cloud. The cloud infrastructure is a composition of two or more clouds (private, community, or public) that remain unique entities but are bound together by standardized or proprietary technology that enables data and application portability (e.g., cloud bursting for load-balancing between clouds).
  • Confused? http://www.flickr.com/photos/slava/1167335643
  • ☑ on demand
  • ☑ on demand☑ elastic
  • ☑ on demand☑ elastic☑ fully managed
  • Cloud taxonomy
  • Cloud taxonomy SaaS PaaS IaaS
  • Cloud taxonomyPrivate Public Hybrid SaaS PaaS IaaS
  • Software as a Service
  • Software as a Service
  • Platform as a Service
  • Platform as a Service
  • Infrastructure as a Service
  • Infrastructure as a Service
  • Demo: Heroku & EC2
  • http://www.flickr.com/photos/dandooo/3966843928
  • “If you want to succeed,double your failure rate.” Thomas J. Watson – President, IBM
  • Developers Operations http://www.flickr.com/photos/drew/2694737921
  • DevOps
  • Demo: Chef
  • http://www.flickr.com/photos/spursfan_ace/2328879637
  • Robustnesshttp://www.flickr.com/photos/sarah_mccans/289861766 Resilience http://www.flickr.com/photos/kokogiak/6274404
  • Assume unreliability
  • Deperimeterisation Admin User
  • Deperimeterisation Admin User
  • Pi (CloudOS)
  • http://www.flickr.com/photos/drachmann/327122302